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View Full Version : How do riders get out of school for shows so often?



isis08
Apr. 28, 2010, 07:49 AM
I show a bunch but I never get to miss a few weeks like the other riders do for shows, how do they get to skip school for shows?

*Liz*
Apr. 28, 2010, 07:58 AM
They have cooler parents than you do, sorry.

Hunter/JumperMom
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:10 AM
They have cooler parents than you do, sorry.

HAHA, seriously, my daughter is a senior in HS, this was the first year she missed alot. Previously, she would miss maybe 6-7 days a year for riding and I would just call her in.

Last year I had to get approval for her to take her finals early to go to Spruce as a working student and it was a nightmare.

Then over the summer, a friend clued me into a program that the HS has, it is called the Elite Athlete Program, set up for kids that do sports outside of the school. Again, another nightmare, but I got her approved to miss 13 days, with no penalty, her teachers had to provide her with the work missed, because of this program. She was able to show 8 long weekends this winter at WEF. But it was awful flying back and forth, wednesdays - sundays. We worked it around the vacations, days off, etc. In the end she only missed 11 classes.

Work with your school, you may be surprised the programs they offer, but just don't tell you about!!

Heineken
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:46 AM
Some kids un-enroll for a quarter or two and enroll in homeschooling or a private school that caters to elite athletes in the location they are showing. Other schools are understanding of the fact that this is entirely possibly the ticket to a huge NCAA scholarship or a stepping stone to a USET team for these gifted riders. It helps to have an educational professional on the ground at home to go to bat for the kids as well (a tutor or otherwise qualified person who isn't a parent interfacing with the schools at home and away).

ponymom64
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:52 AM
Many of the kids work with a tutor while they are away and some are home schooled which makes it a lot easier, but with some planning you should be able to work something out.

You should talk to your guidance counselor and see if he/she can help you organize your schedule if you need to miss time for horseshows.

My DD usually misses a few days a year but the year she was a working student at WEF, we worked with her guidance counselor and her teachers to communicate her work with the tutor. She went to the tutor 3 or 4 mornings a week and was able to keep up with her work at home. That was the first time her school had done something like that and there were a few glitches but basically it worked out. The following year, her schedule was arranged to accommodate a month away but sadly for her the position didn't materialize.

She'll be a senior next fall and once again we will try to organize a schedule that will accommodate a month in Fla., since it will be her last junior year, I will somehow figure out how to get her down there ;)

nlk
Apr. 28, 2010, 09:08 AM
There is a program that holds "classes" in Ocala for the kids who are showing. So I would guess the un-enroll like some one else said. I saw it advertised in my prize list.

Now for local shows I have a handful of shows we do in spring and fall during school. We leave on Friday afternoon so the kids only end up missing a half day once or twice a month April/May and September. So you're not the only one!

Aerial
Apr. 28, 2010, 09:38 AM
Well, I'm homeschooled :yes: But I don't go to any week-long shows either, so the only real benefit in that respect is that I can go school on Fridays and pack the trailer on Thursday.

theoldgreymare
Apr. 28, 2010, 10:31 AM
One of mine is HS'd but he does not get to miss much for shows. Any shows that involve more than a weekend are saved for the summer. It does give him the flexibility to ride more than one horse or pony a day (as long as assignments are up to date).

There are other equine related opportunities that I will let him miss school for though.....like next week's trip to New Bolton. He is considering vet school so we think of it as a field trip.

danceronice
Apr. 28, 2010, 10:35 AM
The parents have to be really proactive about it. The Elite Athletes program sounds really helpful. A lot of the young skaters I knew when I worked for SCOB were on half-day plans, their skating was their gym credit, they were tutored...they basically had to rework their lives around skating. Heck, one girl was commuting from Albany every week with her mother. (We were in Boston. Yes, that Albany. The one in New York.) They eventually found a place, while her father and brother stayed in NY. (Yes, her parents were still married.) The parents have to be really involved with the schools to make it work, but if the kids want any chance at all of getting to the top, they find a way to make it work.

Roxy SM
Apr. 28, 2010, 10:55 AM
I missed a lot of school for shows in high school and it actualy worked out pretty well. I had good grades and would do the work ahead of time instead of after I got back, which I think the teachers liked much better, and I did too because then I could go to the show without having to worry about some test I had to make up when I got back. As for them allowing me to miss more than the regular limit, it probably helped that my grandmother had been president of the board of education there decades ago when her kids were there. In fact, the guy that was principal when I was there she'd hired as a teacher when she was president! I even left my senior year weeks early to go to Spruce. I missed prom, graduation, and that "required" community service, but it was totally worth it!

TheBrownHorse
Apr. 28, 2010, 11:34 AM
I evented through HS, so I would usually only miss the Thursday/Friday of school, and my parents didn't let me show too often during the school year, we tried to stick to the summer shows.

Senior year I left HS to graduate early in an independent study program and was a WS (only met with a teacher 1X a week on Monday's). It was an awesome opportunity, got to ride a LOT (6 horses a day, 6-7 days a week) and show more regularly. New horse wasn't digging cross country, so that summer I switched to H/J barn/trainer.

College, I only have classes M-Th, so Mr. Trainer takes the horses down in the beginning of the week, shows him until I can get there, usually for the F-Sunday portion. I'll leave right after class gets out on the Thursday and drive to wherever the show is (usually 2-4 hrs away) and then pack up on Sunday when I'm done showing and drive home and Mr. Trainer takes the pony back to the barn. Sometimes depending on the time I'll meet Mr. Trainer at the barn and help, but more times than not I have hw to do and bed to get to because I have school the next day.

leilatigress
Apr. 28, 2010, 11:55 AM
I had an FFA program at my HS that allowed me to "rodeo" when I needed to. My school counted the horses and gym credit and I also enrolled in Junior Achievement which allowed a 1/2 day for work. Talk to the school and if you are lucky enough to have a 4H or some sort of Ag program at the school it makes things a lot easier.

findeight
Apr. 28, 2010, 12:57 PM
There are a number of things riders that seem to miss alot of school days do. Home schooling, usually with some private, professional help is pretty standard. Tutors are available at the major circuits and they can work with each students responsibility and their home state requirments.

Many public and most private schools WILL work with each student in preparing lesson plans and monitering their work. Thing is, some states do require physically being in that school x number of days. More and more are considering alternatives but not all. Thing to do is ASK at that school BEFORE you miss any class days.

KateKat
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:11 PM
most of the juniors that I know who are serious are home schooled. Not that it is less challenging and they don't have to keep up on school work, the scheduling is just more flexible. Also, if they bring their home school teacher on the road with them (usually their mothers) they still get school in while away for a show.

indygirl2560
Apr. 28, 2010, 02:50 PM
most of the juniors that I know who are serious are home schooled. Not that it is less challenging and they don't have to keep up on school work, the scheduling is just more flexible. Also, if they bring their home school teacher on the road with them (usually their mothers) they still get school in while away for a show.
this.
My friends that are at every show and doing well are home schooled. I do have some friends that go to almost every show and go to public school, but I know their parents have to fight the school board after a certain number of absences. When I played tennis competitively, my schedule was just like if I was showing all the time(gone almost every weekend and missing a bunch of school). Since my public school raised hell(they didn't care that I had a 4.0 and was nationally ranked), I switched to a private school and my mom was able to convince them that my absences didn't matter(the 4.0 gpa was definitely a big help in that fight)! IMO unless your home schooled, you basically need a parent that will "fight" the school!:lol:

Piadosa
Apr. 28, 2010, 04:27 PM
I was on the road showing at least 15 days a month for 5 or more months a year when I was a junior in HS. I went to a school that was full of mostly athletes (lots if other riders) that doesn't have classes or schedules. Some TAs took attendace, but mine didn't so I could literally go to school whenever I wanted. You work on your own at your own pace, and if you need help you go to a seminar or meet with a teacher. You wrote tests whenever you wanted and could add or drop courses at any time. It was awesome for me, I could take all my work to shows with me. I work better by myself than in a classroom, so I was able to graduate HS in 3 years with honors, and it never got in the way of showing

CR Gorge Girl
Apr. 28, 2010, 05:46 PM
I was on the road showing at least 15 days a month for 5 or more months a year when I was a junior in HS. I went to a school that was full of mostly athletes (lots if other riders) that doesn't have classes or schedules. Some TAs took attendace, but mine didn't so I could literally go to school whenever I wanted. You work on your own at your own pace, and if you need help you go to a seminar or meet with a teacher. You wrote tests whenever you wanted and could add or drop courses at any time. It was awesome for me, I could take all my work to shows with me. I work better by myself than in a classroom, so I was able to graduate HS in 3 years with honors, and it never got in the way of showing

That's really cool!!!

I didn't show HJ, but we did have a high school equestrian team, which does 3 meets a year, plus the state meet if you qualify (wahset.org and ohset.org), and meets are friday-sunday, so i would miss thursday, and sometimes monday. The thursday for travel, and monday because I managed to get these nasty colds right before/right after meets, lol.

My senior year I missed 15 days-3 weeks :eek: - of english (some of the days were just missed periods, we had some during school performances of the play that I had to miss class for, and in the beginning of the year I was horse-shopping, so missed days looking at horses) Amazingly, the school never threw a fit, but they were all excused, and I had good grades, and I think that makes a HUGE difference.

Guin
Apr. 28, 2010, 06:18 PM
Lots of riders at my (private) high school in the NE - they would fly to FL on Thursday night and come back Sunday night or Monday. Since the school had a riding program they were pretty flexible, but boy those girls were super-organized. They did all their schoolwork on planes. They were required to maintain their GPA - if it started slipping, the school wouldn't excuse them for a week until their grades came back up.

EquitateIt
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:12 PM
My school is awful about it. Friends that I ride with are in Elite Athlete programs (public school), or their school is just very flexible (private). Mine however, not so much. I go to public high school, and I have 10 sick days (after 10 a doctors notice is needed for the absence to be considered unexcused). Basically I just work with my ten days, miss a Friday here, last two periods there.. anything to keep my days from stacking up. I can't have unexcused absences because that will affect my chances of getting into college, and if I go much after 10 absences without a doctors note I get fined. (Apparently, this is all state law. My friends live in the same state and go to public schools and have much more flexible rules??)

I asked my guidance counselor about it once. He basically told me that there was a girl who swam at the international level, she was so good she trained with Michael Phelps and didn't swim on our school team. All of her absences were unexcused.

It's really very frustrating. I cannot "pull out" for a semester and still graduate because of my schools "8 on-campus semesters of P.E." rule. We are considering cyber school my last two years as a junior.

jrzeqrider
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:26 PM
Ahh now if only there was a deal like this for college... i could manage my work while missing class, but those attendance points are killer.

ontarget
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:32 PM
They have cooler parents than you do, sorry.

:lol:

Independant study. I went to a school geared towards athletes, but I also had friends who did independant study through their regular high schools.

For the longer HITS shows, I know Indio (and then Thermal) had a program where you could take classes at the horse shows. Sounds like there's a similar program in Ocala. I never did it, but it was another option.

jrzeqrider, I'm right there with you. I've been able to work most of the absences out with my professors, but then you get those that say "Why should you have an exception when no one else does? You're not the only one in sports, you know." Or those that simply will not give you more than 3 absences, even if you're dying.

Alas. :no: Only two more years.

NYCGIRL
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:50 PM
:lol:

Independant study. I went to a school geared towards
jrzeqrider, I'm right there with you. I've been able to work most of the absences out with my professors, but then you get those that say "Why should you have an exception when no one else does? You're not the only one in sports, you know." Or those that simply will not give you more than 3 absences, even if you're dying.

Alas. :no: Only two more years.I am not sure if you could do this at every school but I have done it in college and grad school. Take all your classes on certain days. For example, all through college and now grad school I have made sure all my class's are on mon and tue. This worked out great for me leave every tue for fl or whatever show I was going to and then came home sun night. It sucks have class 8:30-5:30, but it is so worth it in the end!

Revolution
Apr. 28, 2010, 08:51 PM
At the private school I went to, they dropped all of my marks for missing so much school. So I changed to public school from grade 8 onward, and have had no issues at all. They didn't mind since I got A's in all my classes. I would just tell them about 3 weeks before a long show, then they would give me the work beforehand and I would start working on it before I left then continue during the show.

I never flew back and forth during the winter circuits, would just be gone for about 4 weeks straight. I wouldn't even tell them if I was only missing a day or two, and would try to go to school for a few hours at the local shows. After a couple of years, teachers would warn others that I missed a lot of school but was good about getting caught up. They were all pretty good about creating lesson plans well before the actual class, which helped a lot.

I finished a semester early this year (grade 12), so was all done school before I went to Thermal and WEF for 6 weeks this year. Last year I missed over 70 days of school. It also helps if you mention your results to the teachers and guidance counselors, they don't seem to mind so much if you do well at the shows.

ontarget
Apr. 28, 2010, 09:01 PM
I am not sure if you could do this at every school but I have done it in college and grad school. Take all your classes on certain days. For example, all through college and now grad school I have made sure all my class's are on mon and tue. This worked out great for me leave every tue for fl or whatever show I was going to and then came home sun night. It sucks have class 8:30-5:30, but it is so worth it in the end!

I did think of this and tried very hard to arrange my classes in such a way that were best for showing (and riding), but unfortunately it has become almost impossible due to my major requirements only being offered on certain days/times. Last semester I only had class M/W with one class on F, and that worked great. Unfortunately now though, I can't do that.

WorthTheWait95
Apr. 28, 2010, 10:01 PM
I missed a ridiculous amount of high school for horse shows. I went to a public high school and would regularly get those letters saying "if you miss one more day you fail the semester". Didn't seem to matter if I missed 10 days or 40..it was always the same letter. We always called and notified the school of my schedule at the beginning of each school year but for some reason they never took us off the letter list. We ran into problems here or there when a certain class principal would have a minor heart attack b/c I would be gone so often but they eventually got over it.

I always just worked it out with my teachers and would take exams in a proctored setting when I couldn't physically be there. I was a 4.0 student and also edited my high school newspaper from the road so they never dinged my grades for it. I took all AP classes and graduated at the top of my class so I guess they figured it wasn't worth punishing me...Lucky for me that my high school really encouraged self-reliance to get us ready for college. I only had each class 3 days/week with a study hall during that period on the other two so it was very similar to college and pretty easy to keep up on my own.

Fun Size
Apr. 28, 2010, 11:23 PM
Huh, I had no idea! Well, everyone out there with Juniors....I will be a fully credentialed English/Language Arts teacher with added authorizations in US Government, and maybe music and biology.

Sounds like a dream job to teach riders...I'd travel to the barn, no problem!

Peggy
Apr. 29, 2010, 12:35 AM
College professor here. I don't take attendance. But there is a test or a quiz every week and I will only drop one--if you miss one it's dropped. Miss two--too bad. I have made the very occasional exception (most recently for a student who was stranded by the volcano and couldn't get back to the U.S. after spring break), but it's done by normalizing your grade for the missed quiz to your overall class average. Don't think I've ever excused someone completely for an athletic event, and I can claim to have taught one future Olympian. I don't do makeups. You need to show up for labs to get credit. If the labs aren't full I will let students go another time when the same experiment is being done. Again, I drop a lab, so you can miss one.

copper1
Apr. 29, 2010, 07:23 AM
We never did the winter circuit but I did pull my kid from school on many occassions to go to weekend shows. I discussed with the principle that riding was an athletic endevour and should have as much consideration as football, hockey or iceskating. I also pointed out that my daughter was an excellent student, and a very successful rider and did bring accolades to her school when she won. Principle was great and totally supported her. he did say that I would get letters from the district pointing out that if she missed more than 20 days she would need a doctor's excuse, etc, but we worked around it.The biggest argument I got was from a school seceratary who , when I went to get my kid early one day, and honestly told her why I was taking my daughter out early. "riding a horse is NOT an excuse to leave school early"! I fired off on her telling her that one, she had no right to tell me if I could or not take my kid out of school, and teo, riding was a sport just as important as any other sport. Principle came out of his office at that point and saved the woman's life! LOL! (My kid did graduate with honors and went on to graduate college with honors so missing some school has not affected her academics!)