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tigrrlily04
Apr. 20, 2010, 10:05 AM
I was a spectator at a pretty large recognized event a few weekends ago, and noticed more than a few juniors riding their dressage tests in hunt caps instead of helmets. Is this a new trend??? I was pretty shocked and disappointed to see their parents and coaches cheering along ringside :no: I would think that safety would be more of a consideration, especially for junior riders riding at the lower levels. I'm interested to hear other peoples thoughts on this.

Highflyer
Apr. 20, 2010, 11:50 AM
Is it dumb? Yes. Is it new or illegal? No. I don't understand why anyone wears a hunt cap, but until the rule or the fashion changes, the juniors are unlikely to change.

deltawave
Apr. 20, 2010, 01:03 PM
There's no cure for dumb, there's no excuse for bad judgment, and there's nothing like the horse world to top a culture of "this is how we've always done it". :no:

CANTEREOIN
Apr. 20, 2010, 03:26 PM
Some of the most prominent poster's here wears a hunt cap in the dressage phase. I was surprised at the response to a pm I sent them about it. I hope that with Courtney's struggle the attitude changes towards fashion changes to back safety over looks.

mcorbett
Apr. 20, 2010, 03:33 PM
hm, I have worn one in the past and, to be honest, love the way it looks. But, yes, after Courtney's fall I am really rethinking it...maybe a new helmet for dressage/stadium will be on my rolex shopping list. I want to be an example to my students and always wear one when at home, so....

yellowbritches
Apr. 20, 2010, 03:44 PM
hm, I have worn one in the past and, to be honest, love the way it looks. But, yes, after Courtney's fall I am really rethinking it...maybe a new helmet for dressage/stadium will be on my rolex shopping list. I want to be an example to my students and always wear one when at home, so....
I am the same way as is the boss. However, he's been wearing his helmet at the last few outings. Actually, he took Vernon and another horse to a dressage show while I was on vacation last month, and knowing that either horse could be a rodeo, he wore is helmet (he was actually suspecting Vernon would buck him off :lol:). Well, the little mare had some meltdown while going around the ring and in a blink of an eye stood up and went over backwards. THANKFULLY, he fell away from her, but he was thanking his stars for having the had the thought to put his helmet on. I love the way my huntcap looks, but I'm finding it really hard right now to think looks are more important than my brains.

tigrrlily04
Apr. 20, 2010, 04:15 PM
Some of the most prominent poster's here wears a hunt cap in the dressage phase. I was surprised at the response to a pm I sent them about it. I hope that with Courtney's struggle the attitude changes towards fashion changes to back safety over looks.

Before, I've never particularly noticed one way or another at the lower level what people were wearing on their heads, but I think this is exactly why I noticed it. I can see the upper level riders wanting to wear their top hats instead of helmets because of the way it looks (but that's a totally different discussion!). I think the reason I was really put off by it was that these were kids riding training level, there is absolutely no reason why they should not be wearing an approved helmet. I know it's not illegal and people will do what they do, but I thought that it was sad that the coaches/parents didn't step in. Not only did they not step in, they probably purchased the caps for their kids!

Eventingjunkie
Apr. 20, 2010, 05:38 PM
hm, I have worn one in the past and, to be honest, love the way it looks. But, yes, after Courtney's fall I am really rethinking it...maybe a new helmet for dressage/stadium will be on my rolex shopping list. I want to be an example to my students and always wear one when at home, so....

What incident and Courtney are we talking about? Whomever it is, I hope they are okay.

bornfreenowexpensive
Apr. 20, 2010, 05:47 PM
What incident and Courtney are we talking about? Whomever it is, I hope they are okay.


Courtney King...one of the Top US dressage riders. She had a fall schooling a horse when he tripped over his own legs and went down with her. She was in a coma for a while and is slowly on her road to recovery.

RunForIt
Apr. 20, 2010, 06:18 PM
There are no guarantees in life...it's all a crap shoot, but I am an example of don't tilt the odds towards disaster. On the afternoon in December I broke my neck while doing trot sets, I fortunately didn't have a concussion due to wearing my helmet...so, after learning my neck was broken, in the ER I could help DH organize: the nurse's station WILL let you use the telephone - DH was in shock-mode, tell him brother's telephone number so family would be informed, along with a close friend's number so that HE could go over to the house and let the dogs out and feed hay...no, I no longer have any need to "look" pretty...my brain is too important to risk...EVERY RIDE - WEAR A HELMET! :cool:

Duramax
Apr. 20, 2010, 09:06 PM
Usually the people wearing hunt caps for dressage or for schooling at the show the day before dressage are the very ones that will have their $700 (or however much they cost) Point 2 inflatable vest on for xc the next day. Safety first! :uhoh: :lol:

Reynard Ridge
Apr. 20, 2010, 09:16 PM
I can see the upper level riders wanting to wear their top hats instead of helmets because of the way it looks (but that's a totally different discussion!).

Disagree, quite strongly. The choice is safety over appearance; it does not matter if you are a beginner or our next Olympic hopeful.

Hey, while be driven to my wedding, I chose to wear a seatbelt over my wedding gown. Odds were in my favor that there would not be an accident, but my personal choice is safety over appearance.

tigrrlily04
Apr. 20, 2010, 10:38 PM
Disagree, quite strongly. The choice is safety over appearance; it does not matter if you are a beginner or our next Olympic hopeful.

Hey, while be driven to my wedding, I chose to wear a seatbelt over my wedding gown. Odds were in my favor that there would not be an accident, but my personal choice is safety over appearance.

I was not agreeing with it by any means, which is why I said it was an entirely different discussion (check out the dressage forum thread), but realize how I worded it may have implied otherwise. Many of the FEI dressage riders have stated fashion as their reason for not wearing a helmet, and I was trying to note that the "top hat and tails" argument does not apply here since it's the lower levels. I guess the reason people wear hunt caps is because it's more fashionable or trendy in their minds, but IMO the potential consequences don't outweigh anything else, and honestly I don't like the look and think people wearing hunt caps look like pin-heads. I know people have been riding in hunt caps for years, but I think the reason I was taken aback by what I saw was that there was an abundance of junior riders who had made the decision (with the help of their parents/coaches) not to wear an approved helmet. I get the same feeling when I see a family riding down the street on bicycles and the kids don't have helmets on. Silly.

barnmaven
Apr. 21, 2010, 09:35 AM
I had always assumed that juniors were required to wear approved helmets when mounted. Maybe it's a rule that should be implemented.

AKB
Apr. 21, 2010, 09:40 AM
I am always amazed when parents let their kids make bad decisions that could have life altering consequences. Step up and be a parent. Tell your kid "No helmet=No riding." Kids will listen if you are clear, reasonable and give instructions that are easy to figure out. My daughters always knew that their ponies/horses could be gone if I ever caught the kids on them without an approved helmet. I have always been pretty easy going about most things, but helmets on kids are not negotiable in my household. I don't know what those parents were thinking when they bought those useless, apparel only, hunt caps.

Jazzy Lady
Apr. 21, 2010, 10:58 AM
Juniors are required to wear approved helmets up here, however, a lot of them have hunt caps that they crack out when they show in the US. It's interesting really.

Heinz 57
Apr. 21, 2010, 02:04 PM
My SO is a bullrider, who is now also starting to ride bareback horses as well. He's fractured his neck and back and broken a few appendages along the way, in addition to having the family jewels stepped on and one of them crushed. I don't dare ask how many concussions he's had. Rarely will he wear a helmet - only on an animal he knows to be especially rank, and even then, maybe not. Last night I watched a horse fall on him and pin his leg. Every day alive, every ride survived is a gift.

You can't make people do anything just by willing them to. If those juniors' parents aren't advocates of every ride, every time, well... the only way you're going to solve that with underage riders is through rule changes.

SuZQuzie
Apr. 21, 2010, 02:19 PM
I am a huge advocate for helmets, as is my trainer, and always where one whether it be hacking out or jumping, but I still wear a huntcap at competitions for dressage. I think it pulls the whole look together and is much more appealing than my skullcap. :p Yes, s*it happens. I probably know that more than most since I have had three serious riding accidents, two of which involved Grade II concussions (knocked unconscious/impaired memory). I was wearing an approved helmet in all three accidents. If you care to make a statement by wearing an approved helmet during your dressage tests, go for it, but don't expect people to listen.

Halfhalt08
Apr. 21, 2010, 02:32 PM
Hate to say it for fear of back lash, but I completely agree.


I am a huge advocate for helmets, as is my trainer, and always where one whether it be hacking out or jumping, but I still wear a huntcap at competitions for dressage. I think it pulls the whole look together and is much more appealing than my skullcap. :p Yes, s*it happens. I probably know that more than most since I have had three serious riding accidents, two of which involved Grade II concussions (knocked unconscious/impaired memory). I was wearing an approved helmet in all three accidents. If you care to make a statement by wearing an approved helmet during your dressage tests, go for it, but don't expect people to listen.

Divine Comedy
Apr. 21, 2010, 02:59 PM
I have to agree with those saying you can't make everyone listen. I am an adult and can make my own decisions, thank you very much. So are many riders.

I would agree with a rule requiring juniors to wear a helmet during dressage, although I would perhaps be ok with them wearing a top hat at YR if under 18. Tradition, you see.

I would NOT agree with a rule requiring adults to wear helmets in dressage. I prefer my hunt cap. I'm not sorry, either.

This, to me, is a case of MYOB. If you see someone driving without a seatbelt, do you follow them until they stop and then get out and ask them why they aren't wearing a helmet? If you want to wear your helmet every time, go for it! I'm not stopping you, nor will I make fun of you or belittle you in any way.

So I say to those of you who have stated that you have actually MESSAGED other posters and asked them why they don't wear helmets in dressage... Mind your own business!

And I'd be thrilled if you stopped calling those of us who choose to wear hunt caps idiots or stupid. We ARE aware of the repercussions, thank you. Just as I am aware that even WITH my safety equipment, I still have a chance of serious injury or death going XC. I still choose to do it.

You are free to express your opinion, but please don't actually harass those of us who prefer a more traditional look.

yellowbritches
Apr. 21, 2010, 04:09 PM
I always thought there was an rule for minors to wear helmets, too. I remember a good friend of mine, who I consider practically my little sister, used to whine at 15/16 about having to wear her helmet in dressage and how she couldn't wait to be 18 so she could get a huntcap (of course, now, being young, dumb, and fearless, she rides quite a lot of the time without one :mad:).

Ajierene
Apr. 21, 2010, 04:33 PM
I am a huge advocate for helmets, as is my trainer, and always where one whether it be hacking out or jumping, but I still wear a huntcap at competitions for dressage. I think it pulls the whole look together and is much more appealing than my skullcap. :p Yes, s*it happens. I probably know that more than most since I have had three serious riding accidents, two of which involved Grade II concussions (knocked unconscious/impaired memory). I was wearing an approved helmet in all three accidents. If you care to make a statement by wearing an approved helmet during your dressage tests, go for it, but don't expect people to listen.


Hate to say it for fear of back lash, but I completely agree.

All I have to say to people who quote 'fashion'' is that the Troxel Grand Prix has a think profile, is ASTM approved, comes out on top of any independent tests that I have seen. The only real different I have ever noticed between the look of the Troxel and the look of the hunt cap, is the harness.

If you want a visual, I wear my Troxel at every show.

http://www.doversaddlery.com/troxel-grand-prix-classic-show-helmet/p/X1-36058/cn/39/

bambam
Apr. 21, 2010, 04:38 PM
IThis, to me, is a case of MYOB.
So do you disagree with rules requiring approved helmets for jumping phases and a vest for xc? If not, why do you draw the line there on where it is appropriate for the rules to regulate safety equipment and where it is not?
I am not asking this to be snotty (really :))- I genuinely don't see the difference other than the level of risk, but there is undeniably a risk for not doing any of these (wearing an approved helmet in all 3 phases and wearing a vest).
If you want to argue fashion or tradition or whatever that is one thing (whether I agree with it or not)- but I do not understand the argument of MYOB in terms of a rule requiring it at competitions

Beam Me Up
Apr. 21, 2010, 05:10 PM
I'm pretty sure when I was a junior (mid 90s) you had to wear a helmet, and only adults could wear hunt caps. There was much anticpation in the YR divisions to "graduate" to the hunt cap that the older girls could wear. (Though, when I turned 18 I was still too chicken to get on my particular horse without a helmet).

asterix
Apr. 21, 2010, 05:48 PM
I have less and less patience with these arguments about looking traditional.
It's a sport.
Name me another Olympic sport where (proven effective) safety equipment is routinely passed over in favor of looking as much as possible as people did playing that sport 50 years ago.

Yeah.

(rant only slightly influenced by the ABSOLUTE flier I took yesterday off my young horse, hacking AT THE WALK in the FIELD HE LIVES IN. He's a sensible soul but he does have a spook; a pasture mate stuck his head out from behind the runin shed as we passed, and my horse teleported about 15 feet sideways. It was impressive. I was relaxed and on the buckle, and I just got launched into a total belly flop onto the ground. Couldn't have been a more peaceful, quiet moment, and there I was, flat as a pancake.)

It is your business what you wear, I suppose, but that doesn't mean the rest of us can't have opinions about it. It's not safe, and there's no two ways about it. Wearing proper headgear does not influence your dressage score. There's simply no good reason not to do it.

SuZQuzie
Apr. 21, 2010, 06:11 PM
I'm pretty sure when I was a junior (mid 90s) you had to wear a helmet, and only adults could wear hunt caps. There was much anticpation in the YR divisions to "graduate" to the hunt cap that the older girls could wear. (Though, when I turned 18 I was still too chicken to get on my particular horse without a helmet).

I don't think so... at least not with AHSA. I remember being a Jr rider and competing in large ponies in just a hunt cap in the late 90's/early 00's. Perhaps it was different in USCTA.

Brown Horse
Apr. 21, 2010, 06:36 PM
I have less and less patience with these arguments about looking traditional.
It's a sport.
Name me another Olympic sport where (proven effective) safety equipment is routinely passed over in favor of looking as much as possible as people did playing that sport 50 years ago.


Thank you!!! I was having this discussion with my boyfriend just the other day, and we both completely agree with you!

RunForIt
Apr. 21, 2010, 06:50 PM
It's interesting to read these posts defending or explaining why people choose to wear hunt caps for dressage (and keep in mind - that was once me), particularly in light of all the times we have to defend equestrian sports as just that - a sport. No football player would decide to just not wear a helmet because of how it affects the appearance of the rest of his outfit! OMG! :eek: As a friend of mine often says as we listen to what people spout ....."HERE"S YOUR SIGN!" :D :cool:

enjoytheride
Apr. 21, 2010, 06:54 PM
I believe that for schooling shows they do not have to go by any rules they don't want to such as helmets for juniors.

However most of my local schooling shows require a helmet for at least people under 18 and several require it for all people when mounted period.

Often this show is held next to the western show where nobody wears a helmet.

Divine Comedy
Apr. 22, 2010, 12:11 AM
So do you disagree with rules requiring approved helmets for jumping phases and a vest for xc? If not, why do you draw the line there on where it is appropriate for the rules to regulate safety equipment and where it is not?

The MYOB for me is not about the rule question. If a rule did pass, I wouldn't argue with it and I wouldn't bemoan it. I also wouldn't vote for it to pass though. Yes, I DO realize the safety implications. And I also realize it is hypocritical for me to think that juniors should be required to wear helmets, and seniors should have a choice. However, that is the way I feel.

What irritated me enough to finally throw my voice into this argument was the poster who said that she sent messages to "prominent posters" about why they don't wear helmets in dressage. I think it is incredibly rude to go up (or send a personal message) to random people that you don't personally know and demand an explanation about their personal choices. No one has said that they were one of those this person sent messages too, but I bet they would tell you that they were not pleased to take time out of their day to explain their choice (which is ROUTINELY chosen by many, many riders, so it is not as if they are one of the few clinging to tradition) to a random person.

I do get tired of hearing the words "idiotic" and "stupid" being thrown around, but you all are entitled to your opinion, and if that is what you think so be it. I'm certainly not going to change that opinion, and don't worry, I'm not going to try. Honestly, I don't think pro-helmet is wrong at all, but I'm well known to dig in my heels and become the most stubborn person in the planet, particularly if someone is calling me dumb for my choice. I'm the same way about the Point Two air vest at the moment. The more people who look at me funny for not buying one, the more I DON'T want one.

Keep that in mind when you throw those words around. People don't like to be called idiots. If you really want to change people's habits, try NOT calling them names.

And bambam, this is not directed at you. Thank you for responding to me without including any sarcasm or snarkiness. This is a serious topic and I think one of the reasons you don't see as many "pro-tradition" people speaking up is that they tend to get piled on by "pro-helmet". As soon as the piling on begins, I cease paying any attention to the discussion. It takes too much time and energy to defend myself from that. However, intelligent discussion where people can accept that sometimes others' opinions differ from their own....that I am willing to put energy into.

CANTEREOIN
Apr. 22, 2010, 09:23 AM
What irritated me enough to finally throw my voice into this argument was the poster who said that she sent messages to "prominent posters" about why they don't wear helmets in dressage. I think it is incredibly rude to go up (or send a personal message) to random people that you don't personally know and demand an explanation about their personal choices.

I contacted the "prominent poster" privately via email. This person was seriously injured riding a young horse in dressage wearing a hunt cap at a recognized show.

This person is extremely vocal about safety and often begins threads on the issue. I wished them well and suggested they go public using this experience as an example. Again, it was a private email, not public.

I don't randomly express my concerns to folks... I think you should wear an approved helmet every time you get on a horse, but if you choose differently (and you have the money or insurance to cover the expenses of a serious injury), that is your perogative.

Just don't preach safety everywhere else in eventing ...

Divine Comedy
Apr. 22, 2010, 10:15 AM
I contacted the "prominent poster" privately via email. This person was seriously injured riding a young horse in dressage wearing a hunt cap at a recognized show.

This person is extremely vocal about safety and often begins threads on the issue. I wished them well and suggested they go public using this experience as an example. Again, it was a private email, not public.

I don't randomly express my concerns to folks... I think you should wear an approved helmet every time you get on a horse, but if you choose differently (and you have the money or insurance to cover the expenses of a serious injury), that is your perogative.

Just don't preach safety everywhere else in eventing ...


In this instance, I find it more appropriate and useful. The way you phrased it before made me think that you were specifically sending messages to people who were simply prominent on the boards and that you had observed them in real life wearing hunt caps.

I agree that people should not preach safety and then not follow their own advice. Hence why I don't preach safety. I apologize for basically singling you out, but I am also very glad that I had misunderstood your actions.

Rabtfarm
Apr. 22, 2010, 01:57 PM
I have less and less patience with these arguments about looking traditional.
It's a sport.
Name me another Olympic sport where (proven effective) safety equipment is routinely passed over in favor of looking as much as possible as people did playing that sport 50 years ago.



Hockey players. The NHL "strongly recommends" the use of visors, shields or cages on helmets, but does not mandate it. Players make the choice out of comfort as opposed to tradition, but the choice is still the same. Similarly, protective neckbands are also optional depending on the player's preference.

They also experienced a lot of controversy when they changed the rules to require helmets way back when, and had to allow players that had been on teams before the rule change to be allowed to play without helmets.

If you want to change the rules, take it up with the people that make the rules. The only way they got H/J riders to wear helmets was to make it mandatory. As long as there's a choice, people are going to make the one they prefer, and it's not for us to decide if it's a "good" reason or not.

Bobthehorse
Apr. 22, 2010, 03:06 PM
So do you disagree with rules requiring approved helmets for jumping phases and a vest for xc? If not, why do you draw the line there on where it is appropriate for the rules to regulate safety equipment and where it is not?

Its really not our job to legislate stupid. As long as its only hurting themselves, not their horse or other people, I dont care how irresponsible people want to be with their own lives. I will do as I like with mine, they can do as they like with theirs.

I only care about legislating idiocy when it effects others.

ETA I dont think riding the dressage test in a hunt cap is stupid. But I do think jumping without a helmet is stupid. However, I dont expect everyone to agree with me.

tigrrlily04
Apr. 22, 2010, 03:31 PM
Based on the responses, it seems like there are people on both sides of the fence for adult riders... some will never wear a helment, and others will be helmet advocates. Moving on to the question of juniors riding in hunt caps instead of helmets, many people didn't express their opinions directly at this, and others thought that juniors should have to wear approved helmets. I didn't see anyone directly give the argument that juniors should not have to wear helmets (unless juniors were included in the pro-hunt cap arguments). To those of you that are pro-hunt cap...do you feel the same way that juniors can make that decision or does it change your response some when you are only looking at the category of junior riders? Also, I don't really keep up with the rule debates, so does anyone know if the juniors/approved helmet topic has ever been brought up by USEA?

asterix
Apr. 22, 2010, 10:57 PM
I only care about legislating idiocy when it effects others.

ETA I dont think riding the dressage test in a hunt cap is stupid. But I do think jumping without a helmet is stupid. However, I dont expect everyone to agree with me.

The thread describing Courtney King-Dye's recovery from a fall sustained while schooling dressage without a helmet will certainly give you evidence of why riding dressage without one is both stupid, and affects others.

Bobthehorse
Apr. 23, 2010, 12:48 AM
Well first, she was not riding a dressage test, she was schooling at home. There is a difference. Plus, I never said I didnt wear a helmet, I always do, I just dont think its my place to make that choice for everyone. I still dont think its stupid to wear a hunt cap for a dressage test, no matter how many people say it is.

Second, making other people sad is on you, but she did not putting others in harms way why riding without a helmet. If you are not putting others in danger or your horse in danger, I dont care. Why should I care what other people choose do to with their lives? I dont understand how people think they can take away another person's choice in what they do with their own bodies. Why do you care so much?

GotSpots
Apr. 23, 2010, 12:21 PM
Allison Springer just tied for first place in the dressage at Rolex, wearing an approved helmet (including the first 9's of the competition). Absolutely fantastic, all around.

SevenDogs
Apr. 23, 2010, 12:42 PM
Allison Springer just tied for first place in the dressage at Rolex, wearing an approved helmet (including the first 9's of the competition). Absolutely fantastic, all around.

Agreed!

DeltaWave: get out your checkbook.... I believe you owe Ms. Springer a donation to her competition fund or favorite charity! ;)

RacetrackReject
Apr. 23, 2010, 12:50 PM
Yeah Allison!! She just continues to prove that she is a class act.

CANTEREOIN
Apr. 23, 2010, 01:19 PM
Agreed!

DeltaWave: get out your checkbook.... I believe you owe Ms. Springer a donation to her competition fund or favorite charity! ;)

Wow... way to go Allison. You have my donation!

GotSpots
Apr. 23, 2010, 02:06 PM
USEA has a photo of Allison/Arthur on their blog: http://useventing.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/image303.png

bornfreenowexpensive
Apr. 23, 2010, 02:25 PM
I actually think it looks better than a top hat. Always think top hats look silly though....

RunForIt
Apr. 23, 2010, 05:37 PM
Allison Springer just tied for first place in the dressage at Rolex, wearing an approved helmet (including the first 9's of the competition). Absolutely fantastic, all around.

What a WOMAN!!!!! So, GUTS in eventing (Daddy's term is "intestinal fortitude") is something that is required in something other than XC!!!! :D :cool:

rideforthelaurels16
Apr. 23, 2010, 08:00 PM
I can understand why someone would wear a top hat, but I have never understood hunt caps. There are so many very low-profile, lovely looking APPROVED helmets out there, and the difference is so negligible that I'm sure very few people would notice the difference. I, for one, think a CO Hampton looks nicer than a huntcap anyway. I LIKE the look of a harness.

deltawave
Apr. 23, 2010, 10:32 PM
Agreed!

DeltaWave: get out your checkbook.... I believe you owe Ms. Springer a donation to her competition fund or favorite charity! ;)


I am as good as my word, but I would like to point out for the record that the deal was that COTH would PUBLICIZE my offer, BEFORE the event. I also had some offers of help with the prize, but am not holding my breath. :) Neither has happened, but I'll hold up my end of the bargain. My mama didn't raise no cheaters. ;)

asterix
Apr. 23, 2010, 10:34 PM
Lynn, I think that we should figure out a way to make some noise about this, AND make a donation to Allison's cause of choice. I'd be perfectly happy to contribute to "your" prize, but I think we'd be best served by getting some publicity out of this for the cause of wearing helmets in the dressage ring at ALL levels, ALL the time.

Anybody have any good thoughts on this?
(and I'm totally serious, dw, so if you want PM me we can do paypal or whatever works for you)

RunForIt
Apr. 23, 2010, 10:38 PM
Lynn, I think that we should figure out a way to make some noise about this, AND make a donation to Allison's cause of choice. I'd be perfectly happy to contribute to "your" prize, but I think we'd be best served by getting some publicity out of this for the cause of wearing helmets in the dressage ring at ALL levels, ALL the time.

Anybody have any good thoughts on this?
(and I'm totally serious, dw, so if you want PM me we can do paypal or whatever works for you)

I'm in too...proudly, RIGHT NOW, wearing my STRAP ONE ON t-shirt! :cool:

JER
Apr. 23, 2010, 10:39 PM
dw and asterix, I've said before that I would contribute to this and still mean it.

But like asterix says, there should be max publicity for the cause of wearing helmets in dressage.

deltawave
Apr. 23, 2010, 10:48 PM
As I said on the other thread weeks ago, I thought this would be a great opportunity, and it's certainly not too late. I really don't want this to be about me, at all. I'm still happy to do my part, but have no "savvy" for things like publicity or sponsorships, etc.

If someone would like to take up the reins on the aspect of this "cosa nostra" and make it into something that would further publicize this fantastic happening (a proper helmet goes down centerline at one of the biggest venues in the world) then I am 100% for that. If a helmet company (like the one that made Allison's, not sure which brand it was) wanted to step up, great. I'm still OK with making the "prize" happen myself, although contributions are certainly welcome :D but if this can be something bigger and better than just me flapping my mouth, that means so much more to me than having "help". I'd rather see the COTH community at large be acknowledged, if that is even necessary.

So my plea is--would someone be willing to contact COTH or whatever other venues for making this small piece of what is obviously already a "big story" come to life?

And lest the above couple of posts seem ungrateful, which they do to me on re-reading, I apologize to those posters who specifically offered to help out before and who are speaking up again now, and I do thank you. :) There is no hurry--I hope someone can help out with the other aspect of this, and maybe I'll hit y'all up. :lol:

JER
Apr. 23, 2010, 10:55 PM
deltawave, no need to apologize.

I think Allison's act of courage (sanity, actually) caught us all by surprise. In a good way. :)

VicariousRider
Apr. 23, 2010, 11:45 PM
As I said on the other thread weeks ago, I thought this would be a great opportunity, and it's certainly not too late. I really don't want this to be about me, at all. I'm still happy to do my part, but have no "savvy" for things like publicity or sponsorships, etc.


Delta:
I actually didn't mean to single you out at all. I was referring to the entire group that voiced support a few weeks ago. I don't think that you should bear the cost alone. If I were not a poor law student I would happily contribute a chunk. As it is, I will give what I can.

I totally agree that there should be a publicized award or something of that nature. I just checked her website and it appears that she is not sponsored by a helmet company. I am pretty sure from the pictures taken today that she was wearing a Charles Owen. They should get an email.

On Allison's website there is a contact listed as follows:

For all media enquiries, contact:
Chris.e.Stafford
chris@chrisestafford.com
www.chrisestafford.com

Perhaps someone who is interested in organizing this could contact him/her? I would take it on myself but my first spring exam is on Wednesday and I really shouldn't even be on this board right now!!! :)

Sorry to pass-the-buck!!

deltawave
Apr. 23, 2010, 11:59 PM
One of Allison's statements said that Charles Owen had given her the helmet. I already own two CO's but am firmly committed to having my next one made by them as well. I'm very big on voting with my Visa. :)