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GallopGal
Apr. 16, 2010, 11:38 PM
I understand that each movement is given a score of 1-10, with ten being the best. But doesnt the lowest score win?

SnoopyDo
Apr. 17, 2010, 12:00 AM
There is an explanation of eventing dressage scoring available on Discover Eventing (http://www.discovereventing.com/?q=node/71).

GallopGal
Apr. 17, 2010, 12:11 AM
thank you much

LexInVA
Apr. 17, 2010, 12:36 AM
Dressage is scored by using a combination of quantum mechanics theories, complex physics equations, and a generous amount of LSD.

rivenoak
Apr. 17, 2010, 12:52 AM
Dressage is scored by using a combination of quantum mechanics theories, complex physics equations, and a generous amount of LSD.

And fueled by chocolate and caffeine. Oh, and the desire to avoid the whining of competitors wanting the scoreboard updated, like, NOW.

GallopGal
Apr. 17, 2010, 01:28 AM
Ok I see now. Its basically your percent minus 100. sounds like how my bio class is graded. We have 10 quizes worth test points each.

RAyers
Apr. 17, 2010, 02:21 AM
Dressage is scored by using a combination of quantum mechanics theories, complex physics equations, and a generous amount of LSD.

Damn close! Let me clarify. It is so simple, it is the Schrodinger Equation (http://www.physlink.com/Education/AskExperts/ae329.cfm?CFID=27780842&CFTOKEN=cffdcdbbb9c780fa-0C34826C-15C5-EE01-B9C903BC0518BD3C) (with the energy of the horse and rider given by the Hamilton function) is mapped using a Moerbius Transformation (http://www.ima.umn.edu/~arnold/complex/mobius-g.html). This describes every particle of the horse and rider as a non-vanishing value (e.g. the derivative is not zero) within the complex plane so long as the space is contained within a defined subset, e.g. the white box. Thus, your existence is the score and that the beginning and end do not matter on the path (you enter and leave at "A") so the test itself is "0" and moot.

This is why I went to grad school, to understand judging.

Reed

riderboy
Apr. 17, 2010, 09:27 AM
I think Reed pretty much nailed it. My proposals to th USEA included the following options:
1.) Submitting the test videotaped at home.
2.) Opting out of riding the test altogether. This would incur
a penalty score of say, 60. No chance for a ribbon but so
what?
3.) Legalizing bribery.
4.) With an obvious penalty attached, but allowing a rider to
borrow his/her trainers Grand Prix schoolmaster to ride
the test.
These are the best four options I can think of to deal with the dressage dilemma. Of course, they all fly in the face of why we do dressage in the first place, which is simply to make our horses better jumpers.

Fancy That
Apr. 17, 2010, 12:24 PM
Ok I see now. Its basically your percent minus 100. sounds like how my bio class is graded. We have 10 quizes worth test points each.

Oh - I never thought of it that way. Brilliant! So say your normal dressage test scored 68%. In "eventing dressage score" it would be 32 (100 - 68) The way you describe it, the eventing dressage score would be -32. (but it's just "32" ,right?)

When I first started dabbling, all I knew was that the lower your dressage score the better :) But I didn't quite understand it as well as I did the "regular" dressage scores.

:)

Ajierene
Apr. 17, 2010, 02:14 PM
Oh - I never thought of it that way. Brilliant! So say your normal dressage test scored 68%. In "eventing dressage score" it would be 32 (100 - 68) The way you describe it, the eventing dressage score would be -32. (but it's just "32" ,right?)

When I first started dabbling, all I knew was that the lower your dressage score the better :) But I didn't quite understand it as well as I did the "regular" dressage scores.

:)

It is simply 100-percent score. GallopGal just stated the equation backwards. It is done this way because you collect penalty points in eventing. If you score a 7 out of 10 on a movement, the '7' would be your earned points. The amount less than perfect (10) would be your penalty points - a 3.

Hence, if you average in the 30's in eventing, for the dressage phase, then you should average in the 60's for straight dressage.