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Justmyluck
Mar. 21, 2010, 04:15 PM
This is my new guy. I lost my dear boy on December 10th due to an extremely rare form of juvinile cancer he was diagnosed the day before Thanksgiving and the steriods perscribed stop being effective the week before he was euthanized. He was only 5.

I was looking for another horse because riding is what I do. I found this guy and he was just what I was looking for. So I was just wondering what everyone thought about him.

He is 6 and had very little work done with him, and he was not broke when he arrived. He is a Welsh Cob cross 14.2 hands and has tons of personality, I'm amazed he cant talk. He had 2 months solid ground work and I put the first 5 rides on him, and he left for the trainers yesterday.

Conformation picture this was taken over the summer by his old owner.

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/Jubilee.jpg

Some of his first ride:

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/circle.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/down.jpg

Fifth ride (I have a horrible habit of looking down while riding young horses) :

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/crop.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/pat.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/walk.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/jump.jpg

Then some random action shots:

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/trot.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/trot.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/hi-1.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/nofeet.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/runaway.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/steering.jpg

http://i369.photobucket.com/albums/oo133/ghoofs/Jubilee/walk-1.jpg


So what do you think of his conformation for dressage? Whats going to be easy for him? Whats going to be hard?

exvet
Mar. 21, 2010, 09:39 PM
If you haven't yet, may I suggest you send the riding pictures to the owner of his sire (his breeder). You may have already done so but if not I know she would be elated to see these. He looks to be a good trying type. Have fun with him. My welsh cob cross has turned out to be one of the most versatile horses (ponies) we have.

TKR
Mar. 21, 2010, 10:33 PM
Congratulations on your new buddy! He is handsome and looks athletic -- great expression! Best of luck --
PennyG

Justmyluck
Mar. 21, 2010, 10:49 PM
She has seen his undersaddle pictures. I purchased him from his breeder I'm insanely annoying about keeping people updated about the horses I purchase. =D

exvet
Mar. 21, 2010, 11:36 PM
I'm insanely annoying about keeping people updated about the horses I purchase. =D

I'm sure she's very happy with that. I know I would be. You you should have a lot of fun with him :yes:

Justmyluck
Mar. 28, 2010, 02:42 PM
Im going to bump this up because I'm hoping for some more comments on his possible potential for dressage. I dont have any videos yet to help with this determination but hopefully the conformation shot can help.

Isabeau Z Solace
Mar. 28, 2010, 06:59 PM
Maybe try getting another conformation pic. He looks like he is 'leaning forward.'' As a result both his front and hind legs look like they are somewhat too far 'behind' him. Get a picture with him standing square over his legs.

That said, the conformation of his croup certainly looks 'all purposey.' But hopefully his neck is not really put on the way it looks it is. Again, he is in a 'reach forward' pose.

Gry2Yng
Mar. 28, 2010, 07:45 PM
he's lovely. He should have no problem doing dressage. He has a gorgeous shoulder. Personally, I'd event him. :D

tigrrlily04
Mar. 28, 2010, 09:02 PM
Whoohooo at the "no feet" picture! I see a lovely stretchy circle in the making! He's super cute!

Justmyluck
Mar. 29, 2010, 10:44 PM
he's lovely. He should have no problem doing dressage. He has a gorgeous shoulder. Personally, I'd event him. :D

Actually thats what I was told his siblings are doing. I dont jump except on a rare occassion over fences I KNOW are going to fall down. :yes:

EqTrainer
Mar. 29, 2010, 11:13 PM
Haha about the looking down.. I do it on young horses too. Their ears are the first clue as to what is about to happen next :lol:

I remember lamenting it once to my trainer and he told me that I was just trying to stay alive..

AnotherRound
Mar. 29, 2010, 11:37 PM
`He looks fun. I am sure he can excel at whatever he is taught. He is naturally on his forehand. Nothing displays this so much as his first conformation shot.

When you look down, you move him onto his forehand. You haven't in any of your pics shown an attempt to engage his engine.

Once you begin to, I am sure he will pick it up quickly. Until then, stop looking down. Sit back. Drive him from behind you. Look for lightness up front. That will be the beginning of his fitness to start learning.

Good luck.

LarkspurCO
Mar. 30, 2010, 12:20 AM
I think he's adorable!

AnotherRound, don't you think most every horse is naturally on the forehand? She sat on him five times -- I wouldn't be asking for engagement in these first few rides. Criminy!

AnotherRound
Mar. 30, 2010, 12:26 AM
I think he's adorable!

AnotherRound, don't you think most every horse is naturally on the forehand? She sat on him five times -- I wouldn't be asking for engagement in these first few rides. Criminy!

No. There are horses which are naturaly uphill. Entire breeds of them. (ie, not on the forehand). This one is particularly on the forehand. His shoulder is straight and he will need much strength and muscling to move from behind but he can. However, the rider is not riding him from behind. That's all I was sayng. Once she does, he will begin to gain the strength he needs for dressage.

That's what she was asking for. I presume. Not 'feel good' responses? Honest evaluations? I presumed! Crimminy!

Fixerupper
Mar. 30, 2010, 12:36 AM
"Proud Suburban Mom:
Supporting the Coyote Population - one small, yapping dog at a time."


you are funny/evil ...very funny/very evil :lol::lol::lol:

LarkspurCO
Mar. 30, 2010, 12:51 AM
No. There are horses which are naturaly uphill. Entire breeds of them. (ie, not on the forehand).

I have to disagree here. Just because a horse has an "uphill" conformation doesn't mean it is not on the forehand. Uphill horses don't go about collected just because of their uphill build. Uphill horses DO naturally move on the forehand just as all horses do (unless they happen to be playing around, showing off, rearing, etc.) It's only through training that they learn collection, and of course the uphill horses typically find collection easier.


This one is particularly on the forehand. His shoulder is straight and he will need much strength and muscling to move from behind but he can.

I do not see that at all in this horse, though I'm no expert in conformation. I would have to see him move.


However, the rider is not riding him from behind. That's all I was sayng. Once she does, he will begin to gain the strength he needs for dressage. That's what she was asking for. I presume. Not 'feel good' responses? Honest evaluations? I presumed! Crimminy!

I didn't see where she asked for a critique of her riding, and one cannot critique a ride from a few still photos anyway. Besides, she has sent the horse to a trainer, so hopefully he'll be getting a good start there.:)

Justmyluck
Mar. 30, 2010, 01:51 PM
Haha about the looking down.. I do it on young horses too. Their ears are the first clue as to what is about to happen next :lol:

I remember lamenting it once to my trainer and he told me that I was just trying to stay alive..



Yup I stare at the ears.


About the riding I wasnt asking anything except for walk forward and whoa, walk forward and whoa. He'll get the rest of his knowledge through the trainer. :yes:

Also in the photo I think he is leaning forward to obtain a treat, I wouldnt know because well I wasnt there. But I think thats the leaning forward part. No excusses but in observing him he doesnt stand like that normally.

SisterToSoreFoot
Mar. 30, 2010, 03:40 PM
`He looks fun. I am sure he can excel at whatever he is taught. He is naturally on his forehand. Nothing displays this so much as his first conformation shot

How do you determine "naturally on the forehand" from a conformation still shot? Isn't that something that can only be determined in motion? I've seen uphill looking horses who moved heavy in front and more downhill builds with a nice push-from-behind movement--the figure a horse cuts standing doesn't always translate to how they move!

I also don't see a horse with a straight shoulder in that shot. I see a horse with a pretty nice sloping shoulder, and the pony's "no feet" shot prove to me that he's light on his feet, evidence of a horse who has the suspension and freedom of movement to do well in dressage.

I also agree with Larkspur that being built uphill doesn't mean the horse pops out of the womb never moving on the forehand.

I think he's going to be great.

esdressage
Mar. 30, 2010, 04:42 PM
I like him! In that still shot he looks less like he's heavy on his forehand than like he's leaning in towards his handler for some love! What a fabulous expression he has!

I love the "no feet" photo… what a lovely boy you have. From what I see I don't foresee any particular challenges.

bort84
Mar. 31, 2010, 02:41 PM
Hmm, I don't really see a horse that's heavy on his forehand either... He's certainly not the most uphill build I've ever seen, but that doesn't mean he's downhill either. And I actually think his shoulder looks good, not straight. His legs look clean and relatively well proportioned, and he has a decent slope to his pasterns without them being too long. Overall, he looks like a nicely balanced horse, and that makes him versatile.

Also, I think his neck looks quite nice in the still shot. It's not set super high (but not really low either), but he has a lovely clean throatlatch and the overall shape is very nice (certainly nice enough to put it wherever it needs to go in dressage). I think with work, he will develop into a horse with nice smooth lines. He looks like he should easily be able to do lower level dressage work, and beyond that, a lot of it will depend on his mind and work ethic as well as yours = )

I bet everyone would love to see new shots of him when he's shed out, clipped, and more muscled. How fun!

Kyzteke
Mar. 31, 2010, 03:01 PM
I have to disagree here. Just because a horse has an "uphill" conformation doesn't mean it is not on the forehand. Uphill horses don't go about collected just because of their uphill build. Uphill horses DO naturally move on the forehand just as all horses do (unless they happen to be playing around, showing off, rearing, etc.) It's only through training that they learn collection, and of course the uphill horses typically find collection easier.


I agree.

ANY horse, of ANY breed is "naturally" on the forehand. That is because Nature put 60% of their weight forward -- if you draw a line through where the withers intersect the back, you will see that. ANY horse needs to be taught to use their hindquarters while carrying a rider and using the hindquarters in such a way is the first step towards collection. You will see horses "work off their hindquarters" sometimes when they are playing or doing the "OMG -- I'm spooked!!:eek:" snorty trot, but if they usually move on the forehand. It doesn't bother them and it works just great as long as there is no rider on their back.

Of course a horse that is built more uphill, with a shorter back and stronger hindquarters will find collection easier, but even a horse built like that does not "naturally" work from the rear in most cases. The way Nature made ALL horses is on the forehand. It's humans that want them different. :)

netg
Mar. 31, 2010, 04:15 PM
Of course a horse that is built more uphill, with a shorter back and stronger hindquarters will find collection easier, but even a horse built like that does not "naturally" work from the rear in most cases. The way Nature made ALL horses is on the forehand. It's humans that want them different. :)

I only know when my horse trots or canters without a rider you actually see him bend in his back legs and get them under him, where there's a very pronounced difference in the height of his withers vs. his haunches. He must fit in the exception to "most cases." Of course, we won't discuss what happens when there's a rider thrown in the mix messing him up... ;)

Melyni
Mar. 31, 2010, 04:20 PM
That was back in the good old days in the UK. The horse was a buckskin (though being Brits we called him Dun), and his name was Silver Blaze, I just loved that horse. I did EVERYTHING on him, and I do mean everything.

A really nice versatile willing breed.

You are going to have such fun.
MW