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Rosie
Mar. 18, 2010, 01:48 PM
Anyone here that has been diagnosed with Osteoporosis and still ride?
How about jumping?
I've just gotten the bad news and am trying to figure out how much this is going to affect my riding. :(

Cliffy
Mar. 18, 2010, 02:31 PM
I too have recently been diagnosed with Osteoporosis. It is H""" getting old:yes:, but my doctor said riding was ok, "just don't fall off." Not sure she fully understands that risk goes with the turf no matter how good, experienced the rider and horse are, but she knows horses are an important part of my life. I am doing flat work on the safest horse I know. Not sure about jumping yet, but that will be later and low if at all. I am on medication and want to give that time to work. Ask your doctor because there are varying degrees of this condition, some more serious than others.

Thanks for raising this. Will be interested in what others have to say. And good luck.

Rosie
Mar. 19, 2010, 08:06 PM
Cliffy,
My doctor essentially said the same thing - I'm a higher risk for breaking something than a normal person would be - so don't fall off. :)
I'm wondering how to find a doctor that is more familiar with riding/jumping to give me a bit better idea of exactly what my limits are. My horse is a good steady guy - but his jump is really powerful and he jumps hard over even small fences.

Haven't started medication yet, but have been told it's definitely something I should look into. Can't remember the t scores, but apparently it's not severe yet. Still, something to be concerned about and it looks like it is going to affect my riding. Just not sure how much yet.

Good luck to you also and happy riding.

Foxtrot's
Mar. 19, 2010, 10:08 PM
Like one in four adults, I have osteoporosis, and have had it for several years.
My daughters also have osteopaeni too, at 27 and 32 years old.

If we had known then abut bone scans, I probably had it in my twenties, also - just that not many people get diagnosed that young.

We have a better diet from a young age, more calcium, milk, veggies, etc.
Sports is also very important, walking, tennis, etc. I go to an Osteo-Fit class twice a week. It is range of motion, stretching, balance, abs, etc. Nothing terribly dramatic but I like it.

I have tried Fosamax (nearly killed mw with indigestion0, Didrical, (My bone density numbers went down again) and now I am on Actonel, (the more expensive one).

I still plan to ride into my dotage. Trick is to find the right horse. I'm not so keen on the youngies any more, the hunt might be a bit much, and jumping is fine if you keep it up and know your horse (I don't mean GP here!)

What I think I am saying is, keep on going and going and going, or else you end up going the other way fast. Obviously, common sense and a conservative approach to horses is ssmart.

What else could one do - hide and do nothing that's fun to us?

Coyoteco
Mar. 19, 2010, 10:44 PM
One thing to note is that osteoporosis can cause some disturbance to your balance so take care to do balancing exercises.

It's a personal decision on how much or little you want to limit your riding.

Rosie
Mar. 19, 2010, 10:56 PM
Foxtrots,
I agree that continuing to stay active is important - I'm just trying to evaluate what is an appropriate amount of "risk" - and balance that with my wish to continue to ride competitively.
Until December I was showing in the adult jumper division (3'-3" to 3'7") when my leg broke while I was landing from a jump. Not the first broken bone I've had - but the first that I've gotten that wasn't related to a fall. Initially, ortho doc was saying it was probably just a "freak" accident - now, I'm not so sure.

Sounds as though you have tried several medications. Have they actually reversed the loss of density/made your bones more dense or just kept you from getting worse?

Foxtrot's
Mar. 20, 2010, 12:43 AM
Hmmm...legs don't just break...sorry to hear that - not good at all. One day on the hunt my horse got down to roll. It was Spring and I guess her coat was itchy. I rolled off her on to my side when she was down and broke three ribs from what was very much a non-fall. The doctor said it was probably how I landed with my elbow at my side, but it was the osteo, I am sure. Since then I've broken three more (car accident), a broken sternum (horse with no manners pushed me to the wall), and a chiro adjustment broke another...

Re the bone scans: I have had five in all. First three showed worsening,
fourth one went up a bit (I hoped it was the Actonel), and fifth one (recently) showed a further 6% minus.
Sometimes I wonder if the calibrations or technicians don't cause a variance.
Don't know. It is something to be taken seriously with lifestyle changes, but we can't change what we grew up with.
I'm riding a young horse right now (a 7 y.o homebred, but she is l7.00 hh) and while she is a good girl, is very powerful. I wish I had a small TW! I only jump the odd log now but mainly because I didn't keep up the jumping and seem to have lost desire (otherwise known as guts?)

It is just that I'm not about to give in. I don't expect to ride like I used to, but the horses are my life and what get me up in the morning. There may come a day when I feel just too brittle, but I hope I am a long way from that yet.
When you feel great it is tough to think of breaking.

Rosie
Mar. 21, 2010, 12:36 PM
Coyoteco, I didn't know that about osteo affecting balance...good to know.

Foxtrots - I have been wondering if medication can actually reverse bone loss (as some of them claim) or if they are more likely to maintain or slow it.
Sounds like it may vary.
My horse is also a big one...17.2 - but the most dependable, level headed horse I've ever had. Jumps what he is pointed at, non-spooky and has great ground manners. So, although his jump is not "older ammie friendly" the rest of his behaviour certainly is.
I definitely plan on continuing to ride for however long I can...hoping that is far into the future!

If anyone else has any information/tips to pass on - I'd appreciate it.

trina1
Mar. 21, 2010, 01:47 PM
As a doctor who diagnoses and treats osteoporosis, and as a rider who jumps and shows, I would recommend continuing riding but trying to reduce the risk from falls. Anybody can fall hard enough and break a bone, but a fall from a horse can icnrease the risk of a fracture, and that risk is increased in someone with lower bone mass.

Increase in weight bearing activities such as walking can increase bone mass and muscle strength, which can then help reduce fracture risk. Riding does not really count as an exercise to increase bone mass as it is not weight bearing, but good for muscle strengthening and balance. I would recommend taking steps to reduce your fall risk during riding, whether than means riding horses less likely to spook, buck, rear, safter over fences, etc. Other activities around the barn, whether it is picking up heavy buckets, bales of hay, or just a fall can also cause fractures in those with very low bone mass. It really depends on your T scores and changes over time in your bone density scan, as well as other risk factors including family history, medications, prior fractures, smoking, body size to determine your individual fracture risk.


I would disagree with the statement that osteoporosis affects balance. The link is likely more due to age related changes in balance than the bone properties.

Rosie
Mar. 22, 2010, 12:04 PM
trina1,
Thanks for the info. I've got an appointment with my GP to discuss the results more fully.
Wish I could find a doctor who rides. :)

Foxtrot's
Mar. 22, 2010, 08:15 PM
I agree with Doc Trina above : I do have loss of balance, but it is more due to getting older than the osteo. But classes make us more conscious of where we put our feet and to be more cautious.

My Mom and Grandma were the same - but I hope it is true that it is treatable and that my girls do as much as they can to avoid it. We will see forty years from now.

Where I think riding helps is not that it is weight bearing, but it strengthens the muscles around the bones. I like the feeling of keeping my back supple from the horse movements - and all the barn chores that go along with it.

For myself, I need to get even more calcium into me.

I think you need to know how far away from normal you are on your scores.
I'm not planning to fall off any more - but with riding there is no guarantee.
Good luck and ride conservatively.

Rosie
Mar. 23, 2010, 01:40 PM
Well, my mom has great bones and she's 76. In my case, I don't think this is hereditary.
I've always been in shape and exercise regularly as well as having a pretty decent diet from a nutritional standpoint. The few things that "may" have led to bone loss are things that are pretty much out of my control....small frame/bones and treatment for cancer (8 years ago) that involved radiation and chemo.

My t scores are -2.5/-2.6 in my hips and -2.8 in my spine, which from what I can tell is not extreme, but certainly cause for concern - and caution. Especially in light of the pretty major fracture of my leg without any other apparent reason. Although the ortho surgeon who put in the plate and screws said the condition of the bone appeared to be fine.

I'm definitely going to pay more attention to my diet as well as adding more "weight bearing" exercises to my routine and will see what's recommended re: medication.
And, I guess I'll just see how it goes re: jumping. I'm hoping that at least being able to do the AA hunters is going to be ok. At the moment I'm just looking forward to being able to get on my horse and just walk around. :)

MsM
Mar. 26, 2010, 08:08 AM
Arh! I thought I wouldnt have to face this until I was really old (the definition of which keeps changing to a higher number over the years...)
Anyway, at 55 I have just been diagnosed despite exercise and calcium supplements. Another loss in the family genetic lottery - mom had it and older sister has it.
Is anyone on the injectable medicine? I have gastritis and erosive esophagitis so the GI affects of the medications scare me.
Fortunately my horse is mostly good and I know him well enough to know when I need to let him blow off steam without me on him. So my main fears are the odd, can-happen-to-anyone accidents. Still, I intend to continue riding and I will likely take the dont-ask-dont-tell approach with my nonhorsey doctor.

Foxtrot's
Mar. 29, 2010, 11:46 PM
Well, ladies - we will all just have to hang in there and use our heads and common sense. Ride conservatively and hope you have a trustworthy horse. Ask about the different medications. Fosamex nearly killed me with heartburn, but I don't notice any side effects from once a month for two consecutive days Actonel. My own horse is seven years old, l7 hh and can get a bit panicy. She mostly holds her ground and is getting to use her head more, but honestly, I could do with a more Steady Eddie type.

Cliffy
Mar. 30, 2010, 10:39 AM
I was concerned about the biphosphate family side effects and asked my doctor if I could try Evista, which works differently. It is estrogen-related, but is NOT hormone therapy and does not have the side effects of that. It is at least another option you might wish to research and discuss with your doctor. So far, so good in terms of side effects, but I won't know about treating my osteoporosis until I get another scan. Fortunately, I have access to a sweet draft cross foxhunter who is just perfect for tooling around. He's pretty close to the ground too!:)

Brooklyn Born
Mar. 30, 2010, 12:31 PM
I am in my mid-50s and have recently been diagnosed with osteopenia (the precursor to osteoporosis). And that has made me more concerned about falling off my horse. She's basically a good girl, but can pull a nasty spin and bolt out of her repertoire on occasion (she's a quarter horse). She got me off about a month ago because of it. Nothing broke, but boy was I sore. Then just last week, I was helping a friend bring in her horses, and as I was grabbing for the leadshank, the horse I was handling spun around and knocked me hard to the ground. More pain--but nothing broken (fortunately). One of these days, I'm thinking my luck will run out. I have gotten more nervous about riding my horse (she is 7) and have also wondered whether I need a more steady eddy type as well. Of course, it becomes a vicious cycle, because I know my mare goes better with a confident ride, but my confidence pills seem to be losing their efficacy with each passing year :).

pony4me
Mar. 30, 2010, 09:47 PM
Has anyone tried the padded underwear that is supposed to protect your hips if you fall? It may not be designed to withstand a fall off a horse, but it may be better than curtailing your riding. Here's a link to one of them.

http://www.hiprotector.com/padun.html

My bone scan is currently ok, but osteoporosis is a concern since I'm getting older. Due for another bone scan this year, and then we'll see if I have to go back on meds.

Rosie
Mar. 31, 2010, 01:11 PM
pony4me,
were you previously on medication and then got off because your density improved?
I'm curious about how much the different medications can improve density - or whether it normally just helps you keep from losing more.

pony4me
Mar. 31, 2010, 09:41 PM
Yes. On Actonel for maybe a year, and then Fosamax (sp?) for a year, and then had follow up density test which showed enough improvement to go off meds.

Foxtrot's
Apr. 1, 2010, 01:47 AM
Pony - that is super good news and very encouraging for the others. We just have to push the calcium,magnesium, Vitamin d and nutrition/exercise.

My friend was on Evista and she had improvements, too, but I was not advised to go on it. They work differently, one is a hormone. I was on HRT for many years and then they decided that was not the way to go either.....sigh.

There is an Osteoporosis Society. I do not belong, but members of my Osteo-fit class do, so we discuss the newsletters.

Trot on everybody!

birdsong
Apr. 1, 2010, 10:32 AM
Didn't read all of the replies so someone may have mentioned this...you CAN rebuild bone...I took Boniva for several years with good results and the past two years have taken Reclast ..its the annual IV med. I have dramatically improved and think that in another two years I will no longer have even Osteopina....I just take it really easy so I never fall off.

Rosie
Apr. 1, 2010, 04:01 PM
Pony and birdsong - that is very good and encouraging news!
Pony, I hadn't seen the hip protection undies - but as you said, can't imagine they would offer any protection at all in case of a fall from your horse.
I briefly contemplated getting a protective vest to ride in, but for now I don't think I'll do that.
I'm very motivated to do what I can to get some density back....I already had a pretty good diet, but am concentrating even more on calcium rich foods. Exercise regularly, but am adding more weight bearing stuff to the routine and will be adding medication also. Just not sure which one at the moment.
In the meantime, I'm being cautious while riding. Not hard to do since I'm just returning to the saddle after being off since Dec. with a broken leg. :(
But I know as soon as I get back into the swing of things I'm going to want to jump again. Even if it's smaller stuff for a while.

Liz006
Apr. 12, 2010, 11:55 PM
Well, I've been on fosamax and actonel, and bone density went from osteoporosis to osteopenia - but then I had a nasty fall and fractured 3 vertebrae. I'm on the daily injectable med Forteo and having no side effects- but it's a shot a day for 2years. It may make my bone density normal though! There's just no way to avoid a fall. As my ortho pointed out- I could slip on ice in my driveway- so suggested minimizing the liklihood of falling, and not taking extra risks. Life's got risks no matter what, so it's about the choices. I'm getting back into shape after my fractures, and actually feel little enough pain now that I think I can ride again..also take at least 1000 mg ca++ per day, with vitamin D. Best of luck!:yes:

bluemoonfarms
Apr. 22, 2010, 08:56 PM
I just had the misfortune of finding out that bone density scans are not always accurate if you have arthritis. Unfortunately the scan can count arthritic bone spurs as bone and can give a false reading. :eek:

Jamrides
Mar. 13, 2011, 01:59 PM
Hmmm...legs don't just break...sorry to hear that - not good at all. One day on the hunt my horse got down to roll. It was Spring and I guess her coat was itchy. I rolled off her on to my side when she was down and broke three ribs from what was very much a non-fall. The doctor said it was probably how I landed with my elbow at my side, but it was the osteo, I am sure. Since then I've broken three more (car accident), a broken sternum (horse with no manners pushed me to the wall), and a chiro adjustment broke another...

Re the bone scans: I have had five in all. First three showed worsening,
fourth one went up a bit (I hoped it was the Actonel), and fifth one (recently) showed a further 6% minus.
Sometimes I wonder if the calibrations or technicians don't cause a variance.
Don't know. It is something to be taken seriously with lifestyle changes, but we can't change what we grew up with.
I'm riding a young horse right now (a 7 y.o homebred, but she is l7.00 hh) and while she is a good girl, is very powerful. I wish I had a small TW! I only jump the odd log now but mainly because I didn't keep up the jumping and seem to have lost desire (otherwise known as guts?)

It is just that I'm not about to give in. I don't expect to ride like I used to, but the horses are my life and what get me up in the morning. There may come a day when I feel just too brittle, but I hope I am a long way from that yet.
When you feel great it is tough to think of breaking.

I am still in shock. I train (part time) at a hunter jumper barn and ride some green horses that are pretty safe. I'm 59 and was just diagnosed with osteoporosis. Last week I just had a bunch of tests at the Mayo Clinic and this Wednesday I see my doctor for all the results. My T score is -3.1 on my lumbar spine. Your post especially got my attention. I was told if I fall I'll have a spinal fracture and be in intense pain the rest of my life from a doctor before my Mayo Clinic week. All I know is that I don't want to quit riding and have to decide how much risk I'm willing to assume.

Jamrides
Mar. 13, 2011, 02:06 PM
Well, I've been on fosamax and actonel, and bone density went from osteoporosis to osteopenia - but then I had a nasty fall and fractured 3 vertebrae. I'm on the daily injectable med Forteo and having no side effects- but it's a shot a day for 2years. It may make my bone density normal though! There's just no way to avoid a fall. As my ortho pointed out- I could slip on ice in my driveway- so suggested minimizing the liklihood of falling, and not taking extra risks. Life's got risks no matter what, so it's about the choices. I'm getting back into shape after my fractures, and actually feel little enough pain now that I think I can ride again..also take at least 1000 mg ca++ per day, with vitamin D. Best of luck!:yes:

I was recently diagnosed with osteoporosis with a T score of -3.1 in my lumbar spine. I part time train basic dressage at a hunter jumper barn currently riding green horses. They are relatively safe but still green. What scares me as much as a spinal fracture are the drugs. I wish the specialist I was seeing was also a horseman. I would appreciate a diagnosis from that perspective. He has talked to me about Forteo (the name makes me think of a warmblood stallion name :lol:) but I'm not sure our insurance will cover enough of the cost. A previous doctor wants me to go on Fosomax. I'm glad I found this forum to read.

Jamrides
Mar. 13, 2011, 02:18 PM
As a doctor who diagnoses and treats osteoporosis, and as a rider who jumps and shows, I would recommend continuing riding but trying to reduce the risk from falls. Anybody can fall hard enough and break a bone, but a fall from a horse can icnrease the risk of a fracture, and that risk is increased in someone with lower bone mass.

Increase in weight bearing activities such as walking can increase bone mass and muscle strength, which can then help reduce fracture risk. Riding does not really count as an exercise to increase bone mass as it is not weight bearing, but good for muscle strengthening and balance. I would recommend taking steps to reduce your fall risk during riding, whether than means riding horses less likely to spook, buck, rear, safter over fences, etc. Other activities around the barn, whether it is picking up heavy buckets, bales of hay, or just a fall can also cause fractures in those with very low bone mass. It really depends on your T scores and changes over time in your bone density scan, as well as other risk factors including family history, medications, prior fractures, smoking, body size to determine your individual fracture risk.


I would disagree with the statement that osteoporosis affects balance. The link is likely more due to age related changes in balance than the bone properties.

If a 59 year old woman patient came to you with a -3.1 T score who is a good rider (train basic dressage at a hunter barn on pretty safe though green horses) with excellent balance would you change what you said above? A recent xray shows a compression fracture in my T-12 vertebrae. I just finished a week of tests at the Mayo Clinic and will have the results 3/18. I wish my doctor actively rode. I know falling is a part of riding. The first doctor I saw (not at Mayo) freaked out when I said I want to continue to ride. I'm trying to get a perspective on this disease and if I should continue to train or ride. It is heartbreaking to think of not riding or training. How I wish I had had a bone scan at 50. I have no risk factors for the disease except perhaps diet. My parathyroid is normal though even more complete testing was done at Mayo.

foundationmare
Mar. 13, 2011, 08:45 PM
Until I learned that I have a marked scoliotic curve in my spine, lumbar and sacral, that floored me!

I manage a large orthopedic practice and one of our docs is a spine specialist. I asked him to review my x-rays (taken on a whim by my request) and I had the distinct impression that he was aghasted!

He recommended a regimen of calcium and vitamin D twice a day, which I have been doing religiously. I have also increased my dietary calcium intake.

As well, I have lots of weight-bearing exercise in the course of taking care of two TBs on a daily basis and lots and lots of walking.

I have been humbled by the images of my x-rays and the warnings of worsening osteoporosis. I feel vulnerable now where I never did before. A simple trip to the shit pile to dump the wheelbarrow, on snow and ice, has me walking with extreme caution.

In the past I've taken kicks, bites, stomps without lingering effects, but I know that I am at risk for serious inyury now and it scares me. I do NOT want to be incapacitated in any way. That's not a new fear, simply a heightened one. Does this mean that I can't entertain the desire to ride again?

mojo7777
Mar. 13, 2011, 11:42 PM
Count me in with the newly diagnosed. I'll be 59 in a couple of months and apparently moved moved from osteopenia to osteoporosis since my last scan--I don't know my T score and don't think I want to. I know it will be better if I don't fall off my horse, and I try to take all the precautions that I can, but I'm going to continue riding. Today for example I was thrilled to watch my horse sail over a three foot oxer (his first, he's just learning, I'm so proud of him! anyway...:)) with someone else riding. I will stay with the crossrails and tiny verticals and let my friend jump him until he is an old pro. If it's cold and windy and my boy is spooky coming in from his field, he gets longed before he is ridden. I'm just a little more cautious, and I figure that's the best I can do for now.

walkers
Mar. 13, 2011, 11:44 PM
I have not read every post so forgive me if this has already been addressed. but giving up riding isn't going to prevent a fracture. When you have osteoporosis you can break a hip getting out of your car or stepping off the sidewalk. The best prevention is impact work, treadmills, walking and weight lifting. You can still build bone even over 60. Forget the bike it actually leads to osteoporosis, research on bike riders even under age 30 show bone loss. You need the impact to build stronger bones. Vitamin D may be more important than calcium although it seems calcium doesn't hurt. There is no decent research to support calcium claims.Get a blood level on Vit. D. Get your 30 minutes of sun on exposed skin EVER DAY! No sun screen.
So you might as well ride because even if you do nothing but sit in a chair and drive your car you can still have a fracture from severe osteoporosis.
Enjoy life, ride a sane horse and do your walking.

Jamrides
Mar. 14, 2011, 08:59 PM
I have not read every post so forgive me if this has already been addressed. but giving up riding isn't going to prevent a fracture. When you have osteoporosis you can break a hip getting out of your car or stepping off the sidewalk. The best prevention is impact work, treadmills, walking and weight lifting. You can still build bone even over 60. Forget the bike it actually leads to osteoporosis, research on bike riders even under age 30 show bone loss. You need the impact to build stronger bones. Vitamin D may be more important than calcium although it seems calcium doesn't hurt. There is no decent research to support calcium claims.Get a blood level on Vit. D. Get your 30 minutes of sun on exposed skin EVER DAY! No sun screen.
So you might as well ride because even if you do nothing but sit in a chair and drive your car you can still have a fracture from severe osteoporosis.
Enjoy life, ride a sane horse and do your walking.

Well said! I'm debating whether I should still train green horses anymore though I doubt I'll give up riding. I was thinking how annoyed I'll be if I have a fracture because I avoided riding and did something else--like ride my bike on our area's bike trail--when normally I would have been out riding. I rarely fall anyway but........my diagnosis and cautions from doctors is sobering. Still thinking it over. :yes:

Foxtrot's
Mar. 14, 2011, 10:58 PM
A growing form of exercise is Osteo-fit - classes are given by trained fitness trainers with an extra, and on-going, level of knowledge pertaining to osteoporosis from Women's Hospital (here in BC). We have a wonerful class leader, and very pro-active ladies - some of them nearly 90!!! It focusses on flexibiity, balance, range of motion, strength training, co-ordination. It does not do cardio, but I find it helps my riding since I feel stronger and looser.

I recommend trying to find a class near you.

kmbhoya2000
Mar. 15, 2011, 05:06 PM
I'm 33 and have had osteopenia for at least 6 years, when I first started getting bone scans. I have been on prednisone since I was 15, which is most likely the cause. I am definitely more cautious about the horses I ride. Due to my rheumatoid/autoimmune disease that I have, any sort of injury or shock to my system can cause a major problem, so I've also gotten the "don't fall off" lecture. I just make sure that the horse I'm riding isn't too fresh, so sometimes I'll do a little free lunge to get any bucks or hoo-hahs out, and then I'll get on.

walktrot
Mar. 16, 2011, 05:37 PM
This is an especially timely discussion for me because I had a hyperactive parathyroid gland removed on 2/11 and saw the endocrinologist for a follow-up this morning. My last bone scan showed a little additional thinning from the prior one. But the Dr. said that I could reverse it because of the effects of the hyperparathyroidism (it robs calcium from your bones), if I keep up with the megadoses of calcium and vitamin D. She chuckled when I mentioned riding and falling off, but said that I am not at a point where I am at increased risk of fractures. Also, I do not need any other treatment at this time, i.e. no drugs.

The parathyroid problem was found during a routine physical when my blood calcium was too high. I thought I was asymptomatic, but realized after it was over that I was very fatigued. So my horse got a 2-week break which he must have really needed because we have both come back bursting with energy and having more fun.

I am 62, and this getting older business is bothering me some. I really feel for those who have osteoporosis and the dilemma of what to do about riding. I have a wonderful 16 y.o. Paint gelding who’s not quite a steady-Eddie because he’s spooky. I’m a mediocre rider and have been at it for 11 years now. I took me a while, but I can stick with him now, and he’s gotten to be pretty blasé about most things. At my age I’m glad I can get on and off!

Trying
Mar. 17, 2011, 11:01 AM
Have had 3 (yea, I know) hip replacements and have osteopenia and take raw calcium (stones aren't in the diet) and D and HYALURONEX and still ride. For those with real problems, please invest in a crash vest as it will protect ribs and spine and hip (?) in a fall. I have quit breaking horses, sorta.

Dinahmare
Mar. 18, 2011, 01:15 AM
I have had osteopenia for 6 years, I am now 58. I've had 2 falls in that time, neither has resulted in any damage.

Have taken Fosomax as directed by my OB/GYN on and off in these years. Bone scans show hip and spine going up and down.

Orthopedic doctor that I am seeing for unrelated foot problem told me last month that studies by a doctor at Uconn showed that osteopenia patients taking Fosomax (alendronate) showed a higher incidence of chalkstick fractures. However, the same was not true with patients with osteoporosis.

Making an appointment with an endocrynologist to determine whether or not to continue on Fosomax. Hopefully, I can make a decision about continuing the medication after seeing her. I know that many people have a difficult time taking this med but I have been lucky and have absolutely no side effects whatsoever (and trust me, I'm a wuss).

And yeah, why not get the vest? I bought one last year and am not having any trouble with it. Of course, when it's ninety and I'm having a hot flash, I may be singing another song...a tank top and a bulky vest...scary!! Good thing I ride at home.

Trying
Mar. 18, 2011, 01:19 PM
Those on Fosomax, etc., is it true that it slows the sloughing of CA and thus causes brittle bones later on? That's scary. I found that the raw CA was so much better than the other OTC brands that gave me kidney stones (OUCH!!!)

Selene
Mar. 23, 2011, 03:07 PM
This is a different slant of the same issue. My mother has osteoporosis, at age 58. I'm not sure of scores, but she said that with the drug she's on it might reverse to osteopenia. She also has other health complications due to heavy smoking - emphysema, and had a stroke 2 years ago. Recently she asked me if she could get on my old, very steady, horse just to walk around. She hasn't ridden since she was a child.

Should I let her? It would be so good for her state of mind. My old man is a saint, but I'm quite aware that no riding is without risk. I would hate for something to happen. But the riding really might help her get some self confidence back.

JinnyN
Feb. 21, 2012, 04:32 AM
To all you women who have been "diagnosed" with osteoporosis, I recommend visiting the following website: http://saveourbones.com
It's a real eye-opener! I stopped taking Bonviva after reading this, and am trying to change my diet accordingly, among other things, trying to avoid--as much as possible--milk and dairy products. Surprisingly, milk is about the worst thing we can take!
I got onto this natural method after breaking my foot by a slight stamp on the ground (just when about to place my foot in the stirrup, the mare backed off suddenly) which, I feel, shouldn't have been enough to break the bone if it were strong after all those years of medication. Turns out, yeah, the bone is DENSER but also more FRAGILE! So who cares about bone density if it's going to snap so easily? Check it out, you may be amazed.:winkgrin: