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Huntertwo
Mar. 17, 2010, 07:51 PM
Anyone else have this problem? After about a 1/2 hour my feet start to feel numb.

This happens with my AP saddle, Western saddles, and my Aussie.

Only thing that helps is taking my feet out of the stirrups and letting them dangle for a few minutes, but starts up soon as I put them back in..:confused:

Stirrups too long? Too short?

Thanks...

Equibrit
Mar. 17, 2010, 08:04 PM
Too much weight carried on your feet, due to an improperly balanced saddle. You should be carrying more weight through your seat. To test this theory, pad your saddle up a bit at the pommel.

Huntertwo
Mar. 17, 2010, 08:18 PM
Too much weight carried on your feet, due to an improperly balanced saddle. You should be carrying more weight through your seat. To test this theory, pad your saddle up a bit at the pommel.

Thanks... I'll give it a try. Really stinks to look forward to a nice long ride and then feel sore and numb after a 1/2 hr.

Would this be a conformation issue if this happens with several different saddles?

Petstorejunkie
Mar. 17, 2010, 08:27 PM
sounds like an equitation issue. think when you ride "equal weight in my feet as my seat, and equal weight in my toe as my heel"
Also remembering knees pushing against the earth helps me to align myself properly.

Huntertwo
Mar. 17, 2010, 08:52 PM
sounds like an equitation issue. think when you ride "equal weight in my feet as my seat, and equal weight in my toe as my heel"
Also remembering knees pushing against the earth helps me to align myself properly.

Strangely, it only happens when I'm trail riding. In the ring, I'm fine. Unless I'm getting sloppy out there?

I just bought an Aussie saddle, and according to the DVD, your feet should be placed forward, not in the typical position.

But I will remember the equal weight distribution. Hopefully that will help.

prudence
Mar. 17, 2010, 08:54 PM
Try wider, padded stirrups like these:

http://www.chicksaddlery.com/page/CDS/PROD/1087/ES50

Huntertwo
Mar. 17, 2010, 10:03 PM
That's another idea. I have an Abetta Endurance and could probably take them off of that and put them on my new saddle. :yes:

Equibrit
Mar. 17, 2010, 10:10 PM
Would this be a conformation issue if this happens with several different saddles?

Shouldn't be, because your saddles are meant to be fitted and balanced (back to front) to the conformation of that horse. Could be a saddle fitting problem though. Besides it's a lot easier to adjust a saddle than the alternative.

gothedistance
Mar. 18, 2010, 01:02 AM
It **IS** the stirrups. Change over to endurance stirrups, and your problem will go away. That is why endurance stirrups were made - to help give the feet a better, wider, more shock absorbing platform to prevent foot fatigue over the long miles. It has nothing to do with your balance or saddle fitting. Zero. Zip. That's why narrow stirrups don't give you a problem in the ring -- because you spend only 1 hour at the most in there, not enough time to fatigue your feet.

citydog
Mar. 18, 2010, 02:01 AM
Yeah, try the endurance stirrups. You might also have success with putting a gel insole in whatever boots you ride in and/or switching to a different boot. As much as I dislike Ariat, I do need their stiffness (plus gel) if I'm going to be on the trails for a long time. And you should be able to freely wiggle your toes in a boot.

I used to use the endurance stirrups, but the torque--even with English leathers--was too much for my issues. I've been using the MDC ultimates (bendy and with offset eye) for a few years now, and they really help as I don't end up with weight concentrated on the edge of the stirrup, but rather spread over the whole footpiece.

oldpony66
Mar. 18, 2010, 06:21 AM
Strangely, it only happens when I'm trail riding. In the ring, I'm fine. Unless I'm getting sloppy out there?

I just bought an Aussie saddle, and according to the DVD, your feet should be placed forward, not in the typical position.

But I will remember the equal weight distribution. Hopefully that will help.

Same here! I'm hoping to upgrade from riding in my old English saddle to an endurance saddle with decent stirrups this year. But this will happen to me even in my husband's Aussie saddle (which still has "regular" stirrups)

When you say you're fine in the ring, but not OK trail riding... do you trot/canter on the trail? I find that an occasional posting trot helps get my circulation going and I can actually ride LONGER if I mix some trotting in than if I simply walk. That is how I've been solving the problem for now.

Next I have to figure out how to get my knees to stop hurting, but they hurt when I'm not on a horse too... hoping a stirrup upgrade there will also help.

Huntertwo
Mar. 18, 2010, 06:25 AM
Thanks everyone - I'll try another ride today with the endurance stirrups and take it from there. :)

PRS
Mar. 18, 2010, 08:44 AM
I used to have the same problem many years ago. I switched EZ ride endurance stirrups and have no more numbness.

KarenC
Mar. 18, 2010, 08:59 AM
My husband used to have this problem. Switching stirrups didn't help. What did help was changing boots - it was his boots that were causing the problem. I had another friend with the same problem, I suggested changing boots and that solved her problem too. Just a thought.

candandy
Mar. 18, 2010, 09:17 AM
Every once in a while I would have my feet go numb on long rides, also. I realized I was putting to much weight into my stirrups. I rode western on the trails and always had on boots. I then started sitting more on my seat and the numbness went away.

wateryglen
Mar. 18, 2010, 09:30 AM
As a nurse....I can't help thinking there's a circulation impairment or nerve irritation that's happening. Maybe it needs to be evaluated by a doc. Make sure your boots aren't cutting circulation any. Does it tingle when the numbness goes away and the feeling comes back? Like when you're arm goes to sleep in bed? THATS circulation issues. Do you wear different clothing or use different tack when you ride in both places?
I would try longer stirrups maybe?

I've also used those stirrup pad cushions made by Cashel Cushions too. But I agree with the EZ Riders idears!

tabula rashah
Mar. 18, 2010, 09:54 AM
This used to happen to me to- It was not a stirrup issue nor a saddle issue- It was a me issue.
I was fortunate that while I was having this problem- I happened to be in a riding clinic with Wendy Murdoch and I asked her about it. We worked on my seat and balance- plus I went home with a bunch of core exercises. Definitely solved the problem for me.

Guilherme
Mar. 18, 2010, 10:02 AM
Get someone to photo and video you as you ride. If you have a seat issue the lens will show it.

G.

CosMonster
Mar. 18, 2010, 01:47 PM
If it's happening after only about a half hour I wouldn't think the width of the stirrups is probably causing it. I would agree with that on longer rides, though.

I think most likely you're either getting sloppy on the trail and putting too much weight in your stirrup (easy to do), or you're wearing different tack or attire and something is cutting off circulation. Do you ride in the same clothes and boots whether you're in the ring or on the trail?

Huntertwo
Mar. 18, 2010, 02:52 PM
As a nurse....I can't help thinking there's a circulation impairment or nerve irritation that's happening. Maybe it needs to be evaluated by a doc. Make sure your boots aren't cutting circulation any. Does it tingle when the numbness goes away and the feeling comes back? Like when you're arm goes to sleep in bed? THATS circulation issues. Do you wear different clothing or use different tack when you ride in both places?
I would try longer stirrups maybe?

I've also used those stirrup pad cushions made by Cashel Cushions too. But I agree with the EZ Riders idears!

No tingling sensation... They just get numb until I let my feet dangle or take them out of the stirrups.

In this particular case, I do think it is the Aussie saddle. Went out for another ride today with endurance stirrups.

The stirrups did make a difference:yes:. My feet felt fine.

OTOH, I just called Down Under to authorize returning the saddle. It is just not comfortable. The first time out I liked it.
It just puts you in an odd position and just can't get used to riding with feet forward.

Maybe I'm just getting old... but the back of my thighs were so sore the past couple of rides. I thought it was related to the numbness, but today regardless of the stirrups, I was still sore. Perhaps the odd riding position?

Gosh, I sound like one of those little old ladies complaining to the world over every ache and pain. :(

But to answer a few questions, I usually wear loose jeans and paddock boots to ride in.

Why did I ever sell my Bob Marshall???
sniff sniff - the most comfortable saddle ever. :no:

Huntertwo
Mar. 18, 2010, 02:54 PM
Same here! I'm hoping to upgrade from riding in my old English saddle to an endurance saddle with decent stirrups this year. But this will happen to me even in my husband's Aussie saddle (which still has "regular" stirrups)

When you say you're fine in the ring, but not OK trail riding... do you trot/canter on the trail? I find that an occasional posting trot helps get my circulation going and I can actually ride LONGER if I mix some trotting in than if I simply walk. That is how I've been solving the problem for now.



Good idea to mix it up a bit. I'll try my AP again and give it a try.

Thanks everyone for the suggestions!

lizathenag
Mar. 18, 2010, 05:57 PM
The Bow Balance stirrups allowed me to follow the hunt for several hours! I take them where ever I go riding.

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-0761&bhcd2=1268949592

YOu can probably find a better price.

AHorseoffCourse
Mar. 18, 2010, 07:52 PM
I tried the easy ride stirrups and HATE them. I stuck with them for a couple of years, but last month at my first 100, at mile 65 I gave up and went back to my aussie stirrups with the leather pad. I find that using the Aussie stirrups and paying attention to my footwear does teh trick.

I have morton's neuroma in one foot so I'm very picky...

JackandMo
Mar. 18, 2010, 09:40 PM
For me, the issue was stirrup length and shoes.
I lengthen my stirrups for longer (2+ hour) rides. Due to the massive amount of water on our trails, I usually wear my muck boots and my feet always start to tingle, ache, and become numb after half an hour. I am fine if I wear paddock boots or sneakers.

Huntertwo
Mar. 19, 2010, 06:31 AM
The Bow Balance stirrups allowed me to follow the hunt for several hours! I take them where ever I go riding.

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-0761&bhcd2=1268949592

YOu can probably find a better price.
Those look great, except they are a little, well a lot, out of my price range..:)

Huntertwo
Mar. 19, 2010, 06:35 AM
For me, the issue was stirrup length and shoes.
I lengthen my stirrups for longer (2+ hour) rides. Due to the massive amount of water on our trails, I usually wear my muck boots and my feet always start to tingle, ache, and become numb after half an hour. I am fine if I wear paddock boots or sneakers.

Here is where I think I'm having the issue. My feet get numb, but find if I lengthen my stirrups, my butt bone and down the back of my thigh start to hurt. Maybe too much weight there and not enough in the stirrups?

I have found some beautiful plush endurance saddles on Tack Trader, but unfortunately they are wayyyy out of my price range.

analise
Mar. 19, 2010, 10:16 AM
On long rides, my feet get like this too. I usually finagle with the stirrup length or try a different position for a while. (like, standing up in the stirrups to stretch out my legs or just dropping my feet out of the stirrups and shaking them around).

I've also switched to joined stirrups (cheap ones from horseloverz (http://www.horseloverz.com/STA-BRITE-BP-Jointed-Stirrups-with-Black-Pads-pr-188517.html)) but I haven't had the opportunity to use them on a long trail ride yet as I bought them after it got too icky to go out on the trails last fall. They've definitely helped me in the ring, though. Especially since I've had ankle issues with my left ankle after I very impressively sprained it last summer.

Malda
Mar. 20, 2010, 10:28 AM
I thought I was the only person who had tail bone and thigh problems from riding in long stirrups. And I've always had sore feet problems with English stirrups. I finally bought E-Z ride stirrups, it has helped a lot. My rides are usually 2-4 hours and with the new stirrups I don't have feet problems.

Did you ever injure your tailbone? Thirty years ago I fell and hit mine hard, I always assumed that's why I have problems now.




Here is where I think I'm having the issue. My feet get numb, but find if I lengthen my stirrups, my butt bone and down the back of my thigh start to hurt. Maybe too much weight there and not enough in the stirrups?

I have found some beautiful plush endurance saddles on Tack Trader, but unfortunately they are wayyyy out of my price range.

monicabee
Mar. 20, 2010, 11:41 AM
I saw a presentation by Peggy Cummings at the PNER conference - she said many people ride with their stirrups too long on the trail. Her observation, not mine. I keep mine the same as when riding dressage or one hole shorter. Your legs are there to keep you stable and elastic as you move over varied terrain, but not quite as varied as a jump course.

For me, a correctly fitting saddle that helps me keep my tailbones under me (what Peggy Cummings calls "neutral pelvis") and with the stirrups hanging in a balanced position (not too far forward so that I have to pull them back with my legs) is the critical element. Cushioned trail stirrups don't hurt but the balanced saddle is more important. I don't have a lot of weight in my stirrups but they are not just dangling either.

I think the numbness comes from bracing, which you do as your legs and core begin to experience fatigue. The saddle is a major factor, but also some horses travel differently on the trail than in the arena. As a result of more nervous energy (or your body position), the horse may be inverting and therefore creating the brace.

I can ride my horse all day at the trot when he is round. If he is just flying along with his head up, looking around and his hind legs trailing out behind him, it's like a jackhammer. Asking your horse to carry themselves properly with the leg to a massaging action of a single rein will help.

Changing gaits, as someone mentioned, will help too.

There's a lot of interacting elements that can lead to numb feet. You will have to look for your own equation, but it sounds like the saddle was a big part of it.

candandy
Mar. 20, 2010, 11:56 AM
I totally agree with CosMonster in that last post of his/hers?? My foot numbness usually occurred in one of my feet and it wasn't until after a few hours of riding. I did recognize my sensation as being sloppy in the saddle and putting to much weight into my stirrups.

Equibrit
Mar. 20, 2010, 02:14 PM
Here is where I think I'm having the issue. My feet get numb, but find if I lengthen my stirrups, my butt bone and down the back of my thigh start to hurt. Maybe too much weight there and not enough in the stirrups?



Your body is compensating for a poorly balanced saddle.

Huntertwo
Mar. 20, 2010, 07:46 PM
Well, I finally was able to go out for almost two hours today without numbness or pain...:)

I used my Fabtron western saddle and did some stretching exercises before and after riding and it helped tremendously.

Had a light bulb moment yesterday and recalled a former co-boarder who rides endurance telling me ages ago how important it was to stretch after a ride.
I did it after yesterday's ride, before and after todays too.

Stand up straight with something to lean on, and using your hand, bring your leg up behind you as close to your behind as possible and just stretch it there for a few seconds. Repeat with the other leg.

I don't know if it was changing saddles, the stretching, or both, but it felt great today.:) Finally.