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NOMIOMI1
Mar. 15, 2010, 12:06 AM
My new trainer is really focused on getting my horse relaxed in our work. Utilizing the full swing of his movement is such a unique and fun experience, and I am so glad to be getting this type of guidance.

Anyway, a huge part of this is her constant reminder of my horses "level of acceptance" and she watches carefully always telling me when he seems ready for me to really start riding.

She wants to see a lack of resistance and an attentivness to the aids before we really do much other than circles. Sometimes it is half the lesson before we are quiet, and harmonious :lol:

Each ride I am learning how to be as patient as she is and wait for him to truly be ready for our work to begin.

I find that when I wait for him to give me that signal, I have hardly any fight in our ride, and the collection/movements just come. His gaits are much more pure and elegant.

Anyone understand what I mean?

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Mar. 15, 2010, 12:12 AM
It's called a warm-up. :D

BaroquePony
Mar. 15, 2010, 12:18 AM
I have hardly any fight in our ride

Actually there should never be any fight in your ride. Of course getting to that level of skill takes some practice, discipline and education ... on the rider's part ... the horse will follow :yes:

NOMIOMI1
Mar. 15, 2010, 12:21 AM
Sorry poor choice in my wording :) I should have said hardly any tension.

BaroquePony
Mar. 15, 2010, 12:24 AM
Big difference.

AnotherRound
Mar. 15, 2010, 08:21 AM
My new trainer is really focused on getting my horse relaxed in our work. Utilizing the full swing of his movement is such a unique and fun experience, and I am so glad to be getting this type of guidance.

Anyway, a huge part of this is her constant reminder of my horses "level of acceptance" and she watches carefully always telling me when he seems ready for me to really start riding.

She wants to see a lack of resistance and an attentivness to the aids before we really do much other than circles. Sometimes it is half the lesson before we are quiet, and harmonious :lol:

Each ride I am learning how to be as patient as she is and wait for him to truly be ready for our work to begin.

I find that when I wait for him to give me that signal, I have hardly any fight in our ride, and the collection/movements just come. His gaits are much more pure and elegant.

Anyone understand what I mean?

Yes, I do - it sounds like you have a really good trainer. I like her 'attentiveness" to this level of interaction between you and the horse. And yes, its 'only' circles, but as IL2OR said, in a manner of speaking, what you are doing is the core to what you will work through every time you get on the horse, and must come before anything else. As you observed.

My trainer has me doing spiral in and spiral out for this kind of work, too. Its the hardest part, learning to keep the horse's attention during the circle, keep his body language attending to you, keep your seat attending to him. Nice work, and you seem to have come a long way with your training.

dwblover
Mar. 15, 2010, 09:54 AM
Sounds like a wonderful trainer! I was lucky enough to have a clinic with a trainer who sounds similar to yours several months ago. She solely focused on relaxation, swing, and reach for the first half of everyone's ride (or the whole ride if it was needed). It was a wonderful clinic and my horse and I have progressed rapidly since her clinic.

thatsnotme
Mar. 15, 2010, 10:15 AM
Its also interesting that getting there takes different paths with each horse. I have found my mare does really well after some loose canter with me in two-point. She's quite big, and warming her up with trot circles takes forever-I run out of time to school. Letting her blow around the ring a few laps gets her blood pumping much quicker.

winfieldfarm
Mar. 15, 2010, 10:26 AM
Oh thank gawd I came here right after reading the "trainer flips horse" thread.

You are learning a valuable skill of "feel". Treat your horse like an athlete. All athletes require a warm up. This is the period in which the brain and body get in tune with each other. Great athletes are very intune to their bodies and know when the muscles are ready for the work of trianing. Warm up is critical to this stage of readiness.

And yes, horses are different. Some like a good run around the playground to get the blood going and the steam blown off. Some need quiet precise circle work to avoid making their backs tighter.

Your trainer is a star. She is teaching you to tune into your horse's warm up needs and to feel the horse going through the process. and yes, the most important component - patience.

NOMIOMI1
Mar. 15, 2010, 10:46 AM
It's called a warm-up. :D

Yes, well, I have been warming up for years, walk-trot-canter both ways with connection. This is new to me, actually watching the horses response to my aids until they are smooth and invisible.


Big difference.
Yes.



Yes, I do - it sounds like you have a really good trainer. I like her 'attentiveness" to this level of interaction between you and the horse. And yes, its 'only' circles, but as IL2OR said, in a manner of speaking, what you are doing is the core to what you will work through every time you get on the horse, and must come before anything else. As you observed.

My trainer has me doing spiral in and spiral out for this kind of work, too. Its the hardest part, learning to keep the horse's attention during the circle, keep his body language attending to you, keep your seat attending to him. Nice work, and you seem to have come a long way with your training.

EXACTLY! I like how you say the seat attending to him, because if my seat is on its game this part of the lesson seems much shorter and my horse prepares much quicker.

My trainer (her english is so so) will say "OK! Now you can really ride at him and he will accept it!" Once he is loose and quiet even when given a transition request.




Sounds like a wonderful trainer! I was lucky enough to have a clinic with a trainer who sounds similar to yours several months ago. She solely focused on relaxation, swing, and reach for the first half of everyone's ride (or the whole ride if it was needed). It was a wonderful clinic and my horse and I have progressed rapidly since her clinic.

Yes, I am beginning to think that she is a real gem. I havnt had one like this before, while they were excellent, they never really pushed patience in myself and I NEED IT SO BAD :)


Its also interesting that getting there takes different paths with each horse. I have found my mare does really well after some loose canter with me in two-point. She's quite big, and warming her up with trot circles takes forever-I run out of time to school. Letting her blow around the ring a few laps gets her blood pumping much quicker.

Yes one of mine was like that, but this one would be a FIRE breathing dragon if we galloped around lol.


Oh thank gawd I came here right after reading the "trainer flips horse" thread.

You are learning a valuable skill of "feel". Treat your horse like an athlete. All athletes require a warm up. This is the period in which the brain and body get in tune with each other. Great athletes are very intune to their bodies and know when the muscles are ready for the work of trianing. Warm up is critical to this stage of readiness.

And yes, horses are different. Some like a good run around the playground to get the blood going and the steam blown off. Some need quiet precise circle work to avoid making their backs tighter.

Your trainer is a star. She is teaching you to tune into your horse's warm up needs and to feel the horse going through the process. and yes, the most important component - patience.

Yes thats the word I was looking for "tune" like we are in sync before we ask for more. My horse is very happy :yes: