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View Full Version : Splint boots/wraps for dressage?



WSQHGal
Mar. 9, 2010, 12:55 PM
I am looking to get some splint boots/wraps for riding dressage, as I am getting sick of wrapping and unwrapping my polo wraps. :lol: Maybe help me out and tell me what your favorite brand of wraps are and why?

Thank you!:winkgrin:

Dressage_Julie
Mar. 9, 2010, 01:12 PM
I normally buy the DSB (Dressage Sport Boots) but honestly, I am a sucker for deals so I buy what is on sale. Really just a boot that has the fleece liner and is easier to clean than polos :). When I hear splint boots I think jumpers.

fizzyfuzzybuzzy
Mar. 9, 2010, 01:23 PM
The dover sport boots are good too, I like the neoprene lined ones unless you can afford the real sheepskin lined ones. Neoprene are easier to clean, and the fake fleece heats up comparably to the neoprene. If you are hard on your boots or have wet footing, WOOFs hold up really well.

WSQHGal
Mar. 9, 2010, 01:23 PM
When I hear splint boots I think jumpers.

I do too! I just wanted to make sure fellow COTHers knew I was look for boots for my HORSE and not me ;)

scubed
Mar. 9, 2010, 01:36 PM
Really love my Toklat Valena's, though they can be pricey:
https://shop.horsemensoutlet.biz/istar.asp?a=3&dept=HOBOOT&manufacturer=VALEN&sortby=&numperpage=12

Even more money are these, but I am very into the idea of keeping the legs cool these days: https://shop.horsemensoutlet.biz/istar.asp?a=6&id=430101!WORLD

Any of these work: http://www.horseboots.com/1dressage.htm

I also like these and they are easier to clean than they look:http://www.equestriancollections.com/product.asp?groupcode=WB01243

Good prices on several options here: http://www.classicsaddlery.com/bootshorse/exercise.htm

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Mar. 9, 2010, 02:05 PM
I love the Euro Pro / Askans -- great quality, last forever, can wash hot/ Have had front and hinds for my TB who interferes behind for 7 years, they are still nice.

However, I found that the Adelaide, Intec Boots are much cheaper at the same quality. http://www.smartpakequine.com/ProductClass.aspx?productclassid=2594
I don't know yet about longevity, only had them for a few months, but so far they wash very nicely and come out looking like new. (The Dovers are thick and stiff, I really don't like them.)

EDITED TO ADD: The Intec Boots velcro does NOT hold up. Boots come off during exercise. Haven't even had these for a full year. The above mentions Euro Pros/Askans are still going strong!

EquestrianRunner
Mar. 9, 2010, 02:06 PM
while I am not a "dressage only" person, (I event) I would second the WOOF boots. Mine have gone through hell and back and still look good for shows. I also like the Pegasus boots, since they give suspensory support. I have a pair for my big horse and they fit her wonderfully.

These are what I use on my TB for the front. I've had them for 5+ years, and yes some wear and tear but not much considering I use them every day, out on hacks/cross country, ect. http://www.doversaddlery.com/woof-all-purpose-horse-boots/p/X1-04348/cn/1665/

For behind: http://www.doversaddlery.com/woof-single-lock-brushing-boots/p/X1-04484/cn/1665/ These held up better than my front boots, just the straps and such but if you dont want to fork over the money or if you prefer the 2 strap boots.

For my new big horse, I use the Pegasus boots. They are WONDERFULL!!!!! I like them much more than the Professionals Choice Sports Medicine Boots. I got my Pegasus boots at an expo. They are also nice because they fit my big boned 16.3 hand horse and my 15.1 quarter horse. I have the "air boot". http://www.pegasusnw.net/COLOR%20AND%20STYLE%20AIRBOOT%20WEB.htm

I think its highly a matter of what you like and what fits your horse.

Cowgirl
Mar. 9, 2010, 03:09 PM
I like the Woof double locks--they lasted the longest of any boot I had, but they also are hot.

The dsbs/dovers, etc., don't last very long. I've never had a set last longer than six months because of the vinyl cracking. I don't know if that's due to the weather here (arid/dry) or whether it's from washing them in the machine. Needless to say, I bought a couple of sets of four of Professional Choice leather sport boots (and will wash them in the machine with leather wash/hang dry) but haven't used them yet. My friend who has them has been using them since Thanksgiving and they still look new, whereas the DSBs I bought at the same time are falling apart. These type of boots are not as hot as the woofs.

Because my horse travels close, I'm also interested in the hardshell boots. Veredus makes one for dressage called the Piaffe, with a breathable neoprene lining. However, at $400 a set, I just can't bring myself to buy them! LOL!

tigrrlily04
Mar. 9, 2010, 03:15 PM
I really like the Woof Sport (or sometimes called Club) boots. At under $30 you can't really go wrong, and they come in fun colors if you want to deviate from black and white! I like them especially since I sometimes warm up or cool down by going for a quick trail ride, and they don't slip around in the mud or water.

ise@ssl
Mar. 9, 2010, 03:21 PM
I only use the Equilibriums now. They are easy to put on and wash very well. All the other boots just sit in the cupboard and don't get used.

asterix
Mar. 9, 2010, 09:49 PM
unless your horse interferes, do him a favor and don't boot him. Boots do nothing to "support" tendons or ligaments (ask your vet), and only hold heat in, which render them more likely to tear or strain.

Boots or wraps are great for protection against interfering or banging legs against jumps, etc. Otherwise they are counterproductive.

KatherineC
Mar. 10, 2010, 06:48 AM
I used to use the DSBs but my horse got fungus on the front of his hind cannon bones and it took forever to get rid of it. Now I only use them when we are working in the fields or going for a hack. I don't need them for arena work because he doesn't interfere.

dwblover
Mar. 10, 2010, 12:14 PM
I use the Pelham-Ascot washable dressage boots. Tackliquidators on Ebay has them and also Tack of the Day has them from time to time. They hold up really well, even wash after wash. Nice fleece on the inside. I also bought a pair of the actual DSB sport boots and I don't like them nearly as much as the Pelham-Ascots. The elastic on the DSBs just wasn't stretchy enough.

laurenn72
Apr. 18, 2010, 02:00 PM
Try Retacked on Ebay too...can usually find what you need there. The Pelham Ascot boots were a good idea!

mypaintwattie
Apr. 18, 2010, 04:22 PM
I just got a set of baby pink pelham ascot boots on ebay and love them! I also have DSB's, t-foam open front and ankle boots, and classic equine legacy sport boots. I like them all!

preferred
Apr. 18, 2010, 05:04 PM
I've been eyeing the stretch & flex. Do they offer any support? Is there any irritation post use? Those of you that have them; Do you use them front only or all around?

I have valenos and they are OK, not overly impressed. I'm looking to upgrade.

Invite
Apr. 18, 2010, 05:09 PM
I have the DSBs for my mare. My gelding always inherits stuff from horses I no longer have or things the aforementioned moose has outgrown. He has the Dover Sport boots. I've had them with the fleece lining and with the neoprene lining. I much prefer the fleece. He has some Woof boots that are ok. He also has some ThinLine boots. The ThinLines are my favorite of his collection of boots!

I prefer to bandage, as I worry about leg fungus and I just wash the bandages after each ride. This being said, I really want to try the Ecogold dressage boots!

Pony Fixer
Apr. 18, 2010, 07:41 PM
I use the equilibrium stretch and flex (not the ones shaped like a PC boot with the strap under the fetlock, just the "plain" ones).

As someone said above, NO BOOT offers actual support. They only can offer protection. I only use them behind, and not every ride, because my horse occasionally will interfere behind. I bought 4 whites to use for clinics and such only because polos are a PITA. My main concern is the occasional brush, not consistent interference, because they are not heavy and do not have a strike plate. However with all the increasing evidence of heat build up being bad, bad, bad for tendons/ligaments, I wanted maximum lightness/coolness.

I love them--they wash well, look nice, offer the amount of protection I need, and do not rub, hold in heat, etc.

Hampton Bay
Apr. 18, 2010, 08:42 PM
unless your horse interferes, do him a favor and don't boot him. Boots do nothing to "support" tendons or ligaments (ask your vet), and only hold heat in, which render them more likely to tear or strain.

Boots or wraps are great for protection against interfering or banging legs against jumps, etc. Otherwise they are counterproductive.

This. I use polos for clinics, and NEW boots for jumping anything over 2' or when my young horse was learning about round pens. Aside from that, they go naked.

Shiaway
Apr. 18, 2010, 09:39 PM
I use the stretch and flex, too and they are the only boot that doesn't rub my horse's fur and that he doesn't mind wearing. He's rather funny about his legs. He will tolerate whatever but he'll let you know if he doesn't like something (stomping foot, not standing still etc.). I like these because they're breathable and don't trap much heat.

I have seen my horse brush his leg during lateral work when he's lost his balance for a moment and these have protected him from that. If he really interfered I don't think they would hold up. I don't use them for trail rides for that reason.

TheHorseProblem
Feb. 14, 2011, 07:11 PM
Are these boot (http://www.tackliquidators.com/servlet/the-43/dressage-sport-horse-boots%2Ccolored/Detail)s any good? Because they are really cute and the price is right. I am tired of having my Askan boots reinforced because the stitching comes out.

mypaintwattie, you said you just got some. How are they holding up?

Also, there are several kinds with removable sheepskin. Any opinions on those?

dghunter
Feb. 14, 2011, 08:32 PM
I only wrap if we're doing a lot of lateral work where I think he'll hit himself as he's been known to do. I'll use whatever is on hand, mostly polos, sometimes a simple splint boot. If he hits himself it's usually right in the middle of his leg.

Eireamon
Feb. 15, 2011, 04:07 AM
I use the double lock Woof Boots and they are great and hold up well although I am looking to replace them now with a harder shelled boot as my new horse hits himself when he is trying really hard.

While schooling he was suddenly taking a few high (almost Spanish Walk) type steps. Initially I would stop and check he had nothing in his boot then a coach I was using told me it was an evasion.But he still kept doing it.

Then I got a new trainer who told me OMG he is hitting himself so hard that he is actually hurting himself and shes told me to get some harder shelled boots for schooling.

The Woof Boots are quite soft but I have looked at the Thinline boots and they seem to have a weightier inside pad.

Has anyone tried these?


My horse only seems to do it when hes schooling hard and getting tired but I need to make sure hes protected until he gets better balanced as I don't want him doing himself and injury or trying less because hes scared of hitting himself.

hollyhawk
Feb. 15, 2011, 11:50 AM
Eireamon why not look into the Ecogold boots?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09ogdTelXbo

ridealot
Feb. 15, 2011, 01:08 PM
I like the DSB boots as well.

GraceLikeRain
Feb. 15, 2011, 07:30 PM
I like the neoprene lined dover boots.

On sale I can pick up a pair of white ones for $15-20 and they last a very long time. I love schooling in white boots (makes me feel all fancy and such) but with the georgia-clay I know any pair of boots I use will be orange in short order.

These are easy to clean, fit well, and provide moderate protection from shrubs while trail-riding and any interference when doing lateral work. My current pair is going on 18 months and they still look good enough to clinic in.

Quick note: the fleece ones are THICK. I bought a pair and honestly have not used them too much since they just seem so fluffy and stiff. Has anyone else had any luck with the "fleece" dover sport boots?

Eireamon
Feb. 15, 2011, 08:25 PM
Thanks Hollyhawk. That is certainly impressive.

Off to google some more now for more info and to see if I can get some to NZ!

atr
Feb. 15, 2011, 10:54 PM
I prefer to use just Woof ankle boots behind rather than full boots--much cooler and provide appropriate whack protection for my horse. Otherwise, it depends on the time of year and the state of the arena. If it's cold and wet, I have Eskadron neoprene boots, but as soon as it dries up and certainly as soon as it warms up, I ditch the neoprene and use Eskadron climatex wraps.

For clinics, I'll either use white Eskadrons/ankle boots, or break out the white sheepskin lined boots.

Elegante E
Feb. 16, 2011, 09:01 AM
unless your horse interferes, do him a favor and don't boot him. Boots do nothing to "support" tendons or ligaments (ask your vet), and only hold heat in, which render them more likely to tear or strain.

Boots or wraps are great for protection against interfering or banging legs against jumps, etc. Otherwise they are counterproductive.

Just seconding this! Very important that people know that holding in heat on the legs can cause damage. Better to do without.

Sonoma City
Feb. 16, 2011, 04:52 PM
I'm with the crew that says unless you need boots, better off without them. One of my guys in particular brushes and knocks himself frequently, so I use ankle boots behind and plain sport woof boots in front. The woof boots still get very hot, so I'm saving up for these air-flow boots! http://www.equestriancollections.com/product.asp?ic=KY50314R I would never put fleece boots on my horse except in the winter when it's cold out, since IME those get the hottest.

InsideLeg2OutsideRein
Feb. 16, 2011, 08:47 PM
Quick note: the fleece ones are THICK. I bought a pair and honestly have not used them too much since they just seem so fluffy and stiff. Has anyone else had any luck with the "fleece" dover sport boots?

I was given a used pair and also find them way too thick. I only use them when everything else is dirty. :winkgrin:

mojo7777
Feb. 16, 2011, 09:17 PM
I just got the ThinLine All Sport boots, and I really like them. They are soft and conform well to the horse's leg. The strike pad seems very tough and strike-proof. They're pricey, but I was really sold by the anti microbial properties and the light weight. Legs do sweat under them though, even in the cold weather, but probably not like the heavier neoprene type. I'd get them again.

TheHorseProblem
Feb. 17, 2011, 04:54 PM
Just seconding this! Very important that people know that holding in heat on the legs can cause damage. Better to do without.

So am I better off with just bell boots and ankle boots? My horse has a huge overstride and also travels close behind. The hind boots get trashed.

Then there's the peer pressure...

atr
Feb. 17, 2011, 06:44 PM
As for the peer pressure thing, tell 'em Hilda Gurney uses ankle boots behind (and Climatex wraps in front...)

TheHorseProblem
Feb. 17, 2011, 10:46 PM
Compromise: When I went to the tack store, the clerk was a groom for one of Hilda's proteg├ęs. I took this as a sign from above, and followed her recommendation of the Roma gel ankle boots, which she said last much longer that the Eskadrons for about 40% less, and the Equilibrium flat work wraps that were also on sale.

This has been a very informative thread!

mypaintwattie
Feb. 18, 2011, 02:01 AM
mypaintwattie, you said you just got some. How are they holding up?


They are holding up great. I've never even washed them- I don't use them every ride but do use them a few times a week either to ride in or turnout in. My friend has a pair that is a few years old and still looks new! I'd love to get the hot pink ones- mine are the baby pink!

MassageLady
Feb. 18, 2011, 12:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by asterix
unless your horse interferes, do him a favor and don't boot him. Boots do nothing to "support" tendons or ligaments (ask your vet), and only hold heat in, which render them more likely to tear or strain.

Boots or wraps are great for protection against interfering or banging legs against jumps, etc. Otherwise they are counterproductive.

This. I use polos for clinics, and NEW boots for jumping anything over 2' or when my young horse was learning about round pens. Aside from that, they go naked.

I completely agree! IN fact, a good friend who rides alot used to wrap her horses legs all the time, they always swelled up on her-I suggested she not wrap them, and they quit swelling!
You ride the horse to get them stronger, wrapping them doesn't help them, like they said, it heats up the tendon WHICH IS NOT GOOD...you want them cool!

amastrike
Feb. 18, 2011, 01:00 PM
I like the Stretch and Flex wraps. You can get them much cheaper from the UK, even with shipping: http://www.classicdressage.com/catalog/product.php?MF_ID=1&CI_ID=224&CG_ID=&CS_ID=&CSS_ID=&currency=2 (They also have really nice OS bling browbands :D.)

GimmeQs
Mar. 14, 2011, 10:22 AM
Resurrecting this thread to ask if anyone has documentation about wraps offering no benefit other that minor proctection from knocks and scrapes? And potentially causing harm from heating up tendons?

The Eskadron Climatex wraps my horse came with are 75% dead and I'm reviewing my options. I HATE to wrap, but they seem better than any velcro boot (as in, less bulk/hot fleece or neoprene and more comforming to the leg). However, if I see some vet-based facts that no wrap does anything beneficial, I'll go without. Or maybe get the Stretch and Flex (likewise, any studies backing their claim to promote airflow would be appreciated!).

I understand the thoughts regarding wraps being not so good, but seeing as my 16yo had previously used them for basically every schooling ride and has great legs, the moment an injury happens I will blame myself and lack of wraps!

Thanks!

blackhorsegirl
Mar. 14, 2011, 05:23 PM
Some one mentioned that their Dressage Sport Boots fall apart or crack after washing. Been using and washing for years. Can't say they look forever new but for schooling, they're fine. Always wash in cold water and line dry.

If I have a complaint about DSB, it's that they are never on sale. I do like having a wide range of sizes. $60 a pair means I don't buy them often.

netg
Mar. 14, 2011, 06:14 PM
The dover sport boots are good too, I like the neoprene lined ones unless you can afford the real sheepskin lined ones. Neoprene are easier to clean, and the fake fleece heats up comparably to the neoprene. If you are hard on your boots or have wet footing, WOOFs hold up really well.

My horse shredded his WOOFs. Lovely there, little stinker.


I used to use the DSBs but my horse got fungus on the front of his hind cannon bones and it took forever to get rid of it. Now I only use them when we are working in the fields or going for a hack. I don't need them for arena work because he doesn't interfere.

Head and shoulders (or a knock off) takes 1 washing to get rid of the fungus problems.

I prefer not using boots when they aren't needed, as pointed out by others in the thread. I use them for sure if I trail ride (hello, CACTUS!), and when doing lateral work or turning him out. He's very high energy, and only in the last year since I got him has he been learning to loosen his back/lengthen his stride, so now that he has a big overstep he just shreds boots in turnout, because he plays so hard.

In about two weeks he'll be out (with a stall) 24/7 from then on, and I'll have to leave boots off, and hope he doesn't hurt himself! He has stopped doing huge sliding stops since I switched turnout boots to ones which didn't protect his fetlocks from burns, so hopefully he'll be more careful without boots, too.

Living somehwere that temps are about to hit the 100s for months, I definitely try to avoid boots as much as possible!

BladicusStables
Mar. 14, 2011, 06:25 PM
I heard leather is not so good as an option, because it holds in heat.

TheHorseProblem
Mar. 14, 2011, 07:21 PM
I found an article that drops a few big names.

http://www.thathorse.com/the-benefits-of-protecting-your-horse-s-legs/