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View Full Version : Why isn't "eventing" a word?



Bacchus
Mar. 2, 2010, 08:48 AM
It's not in the dictionary -- at least not Merriam-Webster online or any I've looked in. It doesn't even count when you are playing Scrabble!

Even "doh" (or is it "d'oh"?) made it into the dictionary thanks to Homer Simpson.

Why isn't "eventing" recognized as an actual word?

I might have to e-mail Merriam-Webster;)

avezan
Mar. 2, 2010, 09:05 AM
I've noticed that eventing is ok when typing on the computer (spellcheck). It doesn't get underlined. But eventer does. So when you e-mail Merriam Webster, mention eventer too!

LexInVA
Mar. 2, 2010, 09:13 AM
If you type a word that is flagged as misspelled by your Spell Check feature and then mark it as being correctly spelled when using the Spell Check, the program adds that spelling to the Spell Check database on your machine so that it won't flag it again. Doesn't actually mean anything.

Vesper Sparrow
Mar. 2, 2010, 09:22 AM
It is in the Oxford Canadian Dictionary.

Bacchus
Mar. 2, 2010, 05:16 PM
Doesn't surprise me that Canada beat us to it;)

I've been bothered by it for a while.

My husband is addicted to online Scrabble, and the official online Scrabble dictionary pulls from five different dictionaries. He tried to spell eventing the other night, was challenged, and he lost the challenge!

Pretty pathetic considering it's an international sport and is in the Olympics.

I'll be sure to mention eventer, too:)

piccolittle
Mar. 2, 2010, 05:28 PM
Then again it wasn't officially called eventing until a couple of years ago... and it was pretty much a made-up word then...

Ajierene
Mar. 2, 2010, 05:29 PM
The words that get into the dictionary get in by survey. Enough people have to say they are a word, and then enough people have to agree on a definition.

Considering the percentage of the US population that events AND the percentage of the population that is surveyed when each new dictionary is coming out, it is not surprising that 'eventing' or 'eventer' may not be in the dictionary.

LLDM
Mar. 2, 2010, 05:51 PM
If it makes you feel any better, it is a sort of specialty word. The are many technical words, scientific terms and industry specific names/nouns that are not recognized as real words either.

So, it's not personal!

SCFarm