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ayrabz
Feb. 27, 2010, 10:03 AM
Reading about Bernice and Honor was so inspiring! The Long Riders must be quite a unique and dedicated group.
It got me thinking...How fun (!) to truly 'travel' via horseback, and plan a trip. HOWEVER (!) I'll admit that :

I have NO desire to ride along interstates, busy roads...
and I have NO desire to 'pack' along another horse...and tent and sleep out in the elements without creature comforts...

But, again, it DID get me thinking----Does anyone have a 'via trail, accomodation to accomodation' reference of horse travel? (In the US)
Y'know, kinda like the "Inn to Inn rides in Europe? No...I'm not saying each 'accomodation' would have to be 4 star---but that I think it would be sooooooo much fun to plan/map out a 'trip' on TRAILS, (in addition to MINOR traffic roads/routes in connection) and accomodation at the end of the day at a horse savvy situation....room/board for you, stall/paddock/hay/water for horse....

Now THAT is something I could get behind!

:D

ayrabz
Feb. 27, 2010, 10:30 AM
GTD...I so agree. Nothing about riding along side cars appeals to me.
I've found lots of info on the internet about horse and people accomodation places across the country...but they would all require hauling into/out of....I was interested if there were actual 'trails' that, if you began at one accomodation, you could ride within a day and reach another, etc, etc.
Not sure I've ever heard of such an established associated/connected system here....But you're right...I'm gonna go search it!

ayrabz
Feb. 27, 2010, 10:35 AM
http://www.hiddentrails.com/TourType/InnRide/Country/USA.aspx

hmmm...nothing on the east coast except Vermont.:cry:

ToiRider
Feb. 27, 2010, 11:50 AM
I haven't forgotten the man who was driving his team of draft horses across the US -- who got rear-ended by a tractor trailer. Killed two of the horses immediately, and sent the poor driver to the hospital in critical condition.

That is horrible!!! I was following that man's saga for a while. It was really something. Then my computer crashed, I lost my bookmarks, and I forgot all about his travels. Do you have the link to his website?

jnel
Feb. 27, 2010, 05:15 PM
Since first reading about Bernice's trips I've wanted to do a ride, but like you had the idea of staying at a horse friendly B&B or camp ground at least some of the time. My proposed route was to go through the George Washington National Forest and keep on going down into North Carolina. I haven't even come close to planning the details but it seemed a possibility. I can't go until my kids are older but I can dream now right?

Some links on trails in VA
http://www.horseandmuletrails.com/Va.htm

http://www.ironmountainhorsecamp.com/horsebackriding.asp

http://www.horseandtravel.com/states/virginia_horse_trails.html

MoseyAlong
Mar. 8, 2010, 05:39 AM
Reading about Bernice and Honor was so inspiring! The Long Riders must be quite a unique and dedicated group.
It got me thinking...How fun (!) to truly 'travel' via horseback, and plan a trip. HOWEVER (!) I'll admit that :

I have NO desire to ride along interstates, busy roads...
and I have NO desire to 'pack' along another horse...and tent and sleep out in the elements without creature comforts...

But, again, it DID get me thinking----Does anyone have a 'via trail, accomodation to accomodation' reference of horse travel?
...
:D

I wondered this same thing myself. Generally speaking, I believe the
trails are not officially in existence, so a book that documents
official trails is .. um ... premature.:winkgrin:

Local riders seem to ride in exceptional areas (rougher, wetter, etc.),
maybe because it's more interesting and maybe because that is
where parks and reserves are.

I do not think that the local trails are linked to each other at all,
because so few people care. I think most people just want a 1 or
2 day ride, but maybe you could generate the interest, why not?

The exception is the Continental Divide Trail, and that is not for a
beginner horseman, and maybe not for an experienced horseman,
unless Very well planned.:eek:

If somebody got easements to allow you to travel North to South
through Eastern Colorado or Western Kansas, would you do it?
That country is dry plains and could be boring to a lot of people.

Another possibility, in Colorado as an example, would be a N/S trail,
through the far western part of Colorado. It is a generally dry area,
of mostly rolling, sometimes rocky, hills. Enough small mountains,
canyons, plateaus to add very much interest. There is a lot of Gov.
land out there and wild horses like it. It would be kind of a re-creation;
i.e. part of the Outlaw Trail (the very easy part).

What I said above is from "book learnin", so do not take it as gospel;
correct my impressions and give your own thoughts.