PDA

View Full Version : Do they even make a fly sheet you can ride with?



franknbeans
Feb. 20, 2010, 09:02 AM
My big guy is SO fly sensitive! I have been looking for a fly sheet for his hindquarters when I am trail riding. Do they even make such a thing? If so, where can I find one? Am about ready to try making one myself, but still have to find the appropriate fabric......Any advice appreciated! He is SUCH a wimp!;)

Christa P
Feb. 20, 2010, 09:31 AM
Cashel does, it is called Bug Armour:


http://www.cashelcompany.com/ProductDetails.aspx?ProductID=9549

Christa

Guilherme
Feb. 20, 2010, 09:59 AM
I dunno. Seems to me that hanging that much "stuff" on a horse, particularly on the trail, is asking to get tangled in stobs, vines, brush, etc. In an arena or on a manicured trail maybe you can get away with it.

A good fly spray seems to be a better idea.

G.

JollyBadger
Feb. 20, 2010, 10:25 AM
A less expensive option might be to buy a cheap fly sheet, cut off the back end of it and figure out a way to attach it to the back of your saddle. I bought a fly sheet at the QH Congress a few years ago that was apparently designed to fit a large sausage, rather than a horse. . .I will probably cut the back off it this year, just to have it.

The trails I ride have a lot of thorns and honeysuckle bushes, and they're not really well-maintained. So, a mesh rump-rug would probably be more of a nuisance because it would keep getting caught up.

I give my horse a good spray of ZonkIt before a ride in the bug season, and have a smaller travel-size spray bottle in my cantle bag in case it's needed. When the big bomber-sized horse flies come out in late summer, my horse is very good about letting me know he's being "buzzed" and will stop and wait for me to smack it before moving on.:D

jn4jenny
Feb. 20, 2010, 10:47 AM
Yes, Schneider's makes one. My horse tolerates regular flies just fine, but he can't STAND the big B-52 bomber flies. The bombers are attracted to dark moving shapes, so the light color on this sheet and the thick mesh buys me a few seconds to kill the bomber fly.

They tend to sell out in the off-season, but in the summer you can get it:
http://www.sstack.com/Horsewear_Fly-Protection/Dura-Mesh-English-Trail-Sheet/

franknbeans
Feb. 20, 2010, 03:49 PM
Thanks all-will look at those options......our trails are very well groomed......so snagging won't be an issue. When we go "bushwhacking" I will leave it home.

There are just times when NO flyspray works.......I have even sprayed it ON the flies!

Yeah-the big B-52's are awful! All he has to do is HEAR them!

Beverley
Feb. 21, 2010, 12:55 AM
I just show my horses old National Geographic pictures of Bedouin horses with a gazillion flies parked around their eyes, and tell my horses they should be grateful.

I carry Deep Woods Off to use on horse and self as needed in really fly or mosquito laden areas. They are allowed to not be happy about the bugs, but they aren't allowed to do anything drastic about it, usually if it helps we'll just pick up the pace a bit til we find fewer criters.

broughton_sporthorses
Feb. 21, 2010, 04:29 AM
Eskadron also makes one!

JollyBadger
Feb. 21, 2010, 02:39 PM
I just show my horses old National Geographic pictures of Bedouin horses with a gazillion flies parked around their eyes, and tell my horses they should be grateful.



I'm glad to know I'm not the only one who does stuff like this!:lol::winkgrin:

Huntertwo
Feb. 21, 2010, 04:35 PM
Cashel does, it is called Bug Armour:


http://www.cashelcompany.com/ProductDetails.aspx?ProductID=9549

Christa

I do love the Cashel neck cover.... It is great for keeping flies off.

Although, the way the quarter fly sheet hangs I'd be concerned about bugs getting up and under the sheet...:eek:

Diamond Jake
Feb. 22, 2010, 05:48 PM
I may go completely off the redneck deep end, but here goes:

I bought a couple of $5 mosquito netting pieces from Gander Mountain. I stuff each of the corners into the stirrup leather straps on my English saddle. It covers his whole rear, and flank as well. If it tears, it was cheap. If it catches, it should either tear or come out of the keepers. I wanted something particulalry light to use during the heat of the summer.

Then when he bugs are bad I carry my fly whisk with me as well. I believe Jake comes closest to his expression of happiness when I bring the fly whisk!

carp
Feb. 28, 2010, 06:35 PM
My group of trailriding friends has had decent success with Tred-Not deerfly strips. They're designed to be worn on the back of your hat. We put them between the horses' ears, where they attract and capture the deerflies which would normally bite the ears and mane area.

Originally we tried sticking the strips directly to the bridle over the poll. That didn't work so well: it made a mess of the leather bridles and didn't stick very well to the nylon bridles. I had a few strips get stuck to horse ears; yanking them off again resulted in a bit of hair loss and a very displeased horse. Finally (inspired by Marguerite Henry's description of the head pieces worn by Palio competitors of all things) I made some fly strip holders which attach to the bridles with velcro. This design works pretty well.

franknbeans
Mar. 2, 2010, 12:00 PM
Thanks all for the advice-I did order both Cashel pieces to try-I too am hesitant about the hindquarters one, and my guy will stand and let me swat them, but that can be a pain after a while when they are really bad. I can swat the Deerflies on his neck and ears while we are going....just looks pretty goofy!~
I have also tried the horsetail swooshers....they are ok, but hate to carry stuff.

Moving out is another option, and we do that when the terrain allows......

Thanks again! Have fun!

And any of you in the Finger Lakes ares of NY-Check out the hunterpaces and I think a fundraiser trail ride again-at Davidson knolls this summer! They are GREAT!

MoseyAlong
Mar. 4, 2010, 04:51 AM
My group of trailriding friends has had decent success with Tred-Not deerfly strips. They're designed to be worn on the back of your hat. We put them between the horses' ears, where they attract and capture the deerflies which would normally bite the ears and mane area.

Originally we tried sticking the strips directly to the bridle over the poll. That didn't work so well: it made a mess of the leather bridles and didn't stick very well to the nylon bridles. I had a few strips get stuck to horse ears; yanking them off again resulted in a bit of hair loss and a very displeased horse. Finally (inspired by Marguerite Henry's description of the head pieces worn by Palio competitors of all things) I made some fly strip holders which attach to the bridles with velcro. This design works pretty well.

I am having trouble picturing the general orientation of the fly strip.
Does it run front to back or does it run side to side?

Drive NJ
Mar. 4, 2010, 10:36 AM
Just remember no bug spray will repel B52s or deer flies. They are site not scent oriented. You need a cover or swisher to help there.

We had a Hackney Horse my sister rode for many years. He had a docked tail - no comments, we didn't do it. Turns out Hackney's are very sensitive and allergic to bugs and VERY reactive.

One of our solutions in the worst of bug weather was to use a driving string fly net. Never seemed to catch much on anything, swishes to help move flies along and doesn't bother the horse with a decent closed cell pad under the saddle. We rigged up something similar for his neck and carried a fly switch. Looked 'interesting' but it worked.

carp
Mar. 4, 2010, 11:47 AM
I am having trouble picturing the general orientation of the fly strip.
Does it run front to back or does it run side to side?

We've tried it both ways. I prefer the holder going front to back. It covers more of the mane and helps hold the hair under the fly strip if horsie decides to shake his head. I velcro it to the crown piece. The front half of the holder rests between the ears, and the back half sits on the top section of mane.

Romany
Mar. 14, 2010, 05:32 PM
Saratoga Horseworks make a quarter-sheet using their Oasis fabric.

Works really well, and riding with an old-fashioned fly whisk is useful, too.