PDA

View Full Version : Snowmageddon Persists! WWYD?



InstigatorKate
Feb. 19, 2010, 08:59 PM
So, I figured I gave the snow plenty of time to settle down and got myself all ready to ride yesterday. I made it about 10 feet into the ring, and found knee-deep heavy snow with a crunchy top layer throughout the ring. :( NOT ride-able, IMO, and I'll ride in just about anything. I have a 4-day weekend now, and wanted to ride all 4 days, but that's not going to happen. So, I pulled manes, and clipped whiskers, and curried so much my arms felt like they would fall off.

WWYD the rest of the weekend? I have an old guy who's been kept more or less fit throughout this winter (weather permitting), and a coming 4yo with 30 rides last summer and then 1 week of lunging and 1 (great!) ride right before the first blizzard. Trailering to an indoor is an option, but would be financially difficult to do that all 4 days. If I took both, I'm not sure the baby would stand on the trailer while I rode the older guy.

If I can't keep it up is at home, it even worth it to tack on a ride here and there until the snow finally melts?

FLeckenAwesome
Feb. 19, 2010, 09:03 PM
Hang in there!!!

Would they cut you a deal for the indoor? I know I've asked politely about paying in advance for 4 rides and gotten a little bit of a discount. It helps....

Good luck!!! I feel for you! I was going crazy here and it's not even that bad at all!

Highflyer
Feb. 19, 2010, 09:19 PM
I've been riding on the driveway and in the tractor tracks across the field. It sucks. I'm afraid to hack on the road because there's no shoulder at all and people drive like idiots.

asterix
Feb. 19, 2010, 09:41 PM
I know what you mean about the snow being hard to ride in -- I rode my guys in the snow earlier this week and they worked HARD for abou 25 minutes -- both mature and fit.

Do you have tractor paths in the fields? My horses were cantering and trotting in those when I turned them out today, no slipping....

Or the driveway? Our driveway at the barn is NASTY until about midday and then it is slushy -- I could see doing a workout with some lateral work, some trot-walk transitions....

secretariat
Feb. 19, 2010, 09:43 PM
http://teamceoeventing.wordpress.com/2010/02/17/ceo-girls-vs-old-man-winter/#comments

InstigatorKate
Feb. 19, 2010, 10:05 PM
I could ride my old guy up and down the driveway...about 150 yards. The young guy I picture dumping me and running out into the road--not willing to tempt fate on that one.

No tractor paths in the fields.

I miss my old barn where we had a 1/2 mile driveway plowed at all times (owner had a plow company), and could ride from there to my parent's neighborhood--about a 5 mile loop. I'll take some cheese with my whine now :)

Blugal
Feb. 20, 2010, 01:20 AM
In the past I've ridden outdoors in snow for 3 years, with no indoor.

First, it is important to ride every day so you break up the drifts & avoid the crunch on top.

Second, it is helpful if you have something with a little plow horse or QH in it to break trail!

Third, if you do get the crunchy top (and you are lucky to have a ring!) - get thee out with a shovel. I once shoveled for about 4 hours just so I could go and ride my path around the field. I knew if I didn't get it fixed, there would either be no more riding or WAY more shoveling in my future.

Fourth, clipped legs and crunchy top do not mix.

(And PS about the snow - at least you have some. We in the West are looking at a huge drought this summer due to lack of moisture.)

olympicdreams04
Feb. 20, 2010, 06:30 AM
I agree with Blugal. I have ridden all three of mine every day this week except Monday which featured gale force winds and white outs. I like the deep snow, I think it acts much like an aquatread and they have to work for a shorter period of time to get the same vigorous workout. I also gallop for a farm that has preserved the integrity of their track by having us gallop/lope/jog the babies in the infield thru chest high drifts. Again, the only day we didn't work was Monday. If there is sufficient will, there is a way.

EasternMkt
Feb. 20, 2010, 09:45 AM
I've been stuck w/ roadwork since the footing in the ring was getting questionable even before it snowed. No shoulders, so there's usually a bit of traffic dodging that goes on, but most of the side roads are bad enough that no one can speed by:

Where mare is annoyed because she can't see over the sides of the road (http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4032/4373066040_f6cfb6f2c9_b.jpg)

A cleared area (http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4007/4373066168_a012a2474e_o.jpg)

Riding to lunch (http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2771/4372314507_19b868acbb_o.jpg)

retreadeventer
Feb. 20, 2010, 09:55 AM
The thing is, there is different kinds of snow. Some snow is easy to ride in and some is just nothing more than frozen white ice. I've got the latter. What I found was all the places I had more or less plowed melt a bit more each day and now are leaving open ground. So I have kept working opening up more and more tracks each day and finally yesterday got home early enough to open one end of my ring with the tractor and pushing the snow back. When the temp. gets above freezing a little bit during the day it will melt back the little leftover layer and within a few days I hope to have an exposed ring to at least hack in.

Snow that moves when they step in it is easy to work in, but the snow we have with the icy layers is moveable only with a tractor and that with the engine gunned! I feel your pain about four open days and NO place to ride!

And letting the young horse stand in the trailer and wait is a good thing. Work him first maybe and get the edge off, bundle up and make him wait. If he is meant to be a competition horse, he'll end up shipping and waiting a lot so might as well start now. I have one the same way -- he was BUCKING in the trailer at the last clinic I got him to -- it's mortifying, everyone out in the driveway of the stable comes looking for you to tell you your horse is making a racket! :,) I hope he gets over it but the only way is to keep at it I guess until he understands waiting won't hurt. Sigh!

retreadeventer
Feb. 20, 2010, 09:57 AM
I've been stuck w/ roadwork since the footing in the ring was getting questionable even before it snowed. No shoulders, so there's usually a bit of traffic dodging that goes on, but most of the side roads are bad enough that no one can speed by:

Where mare is annoyed because she can't see over the sides of the road (http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4032/4373066040_f6cfb6f2c9_b.jpg)

A cleared area (http://farm5.static.flickr.com/4007/4373066168_a012a2474e_o.jpg)

Riding to lunch (http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2771/4372314507_19b868acbb_o.jpg)

Kewl!!! I know where that store is! Thanks for sharing! :)

Hilary
Feb. 20, 2010, 10:12 AM
The thing is, there is different kinds of snow. Some snow is easy to ride in and some is just nothing more than frozen white ice. I've got the latter. What I found was all the places I had more or less plowed melt a bit more each day and now are leaving open ground. So I have kept working opening up more and more tracks each day and finally yesterday got home early enough to open one end of my ring with the tractor and pushing the snow back. When the temp. gets above freezing a little bit during the day it will melt back the little leftover layer and within a few days I hope to have an exposed ring to at least hack in.

Snow that moves when they step in it is easy to work in, but the snow we have with the icy layers is moveable only with a tractor and that with the engine gunned! I feel your pain about four open days and NO place to ride!

And letting the young horse stand in the trailer and wait is a good thing. Work him first maybe and get the edge off, bundle up and make him wait. If he is meant to be a competition horse, he'll end up shipping and waiting a lot so might as well start now. I have one the same way -- he was BUCKING in the trailer at the last clinic I got him to -- it's mortifying, everyone out in the driveway of the stable comes looking for you to tell you your horse is making a racket! :,) I hope he gets over it but the only way is to keep at it I guess until he understands waiting won't hurt. Sigh!



Spoken like a true New Englander! See- you've made it past the darkest depths of last week's posts. And you're bragging about it. :)

Auburn
Feb. 20, 2010, 10:35 AM
We are to have some snow today, then it is supposed to start raining. Once it rains on the snow, the snow will become a solid chunk of ice.

Opening day for Spring Bay is next week. Unless Mary really dumbs down the course, there is not much of a chance that we will be ready to run. Since there are only three events being run at or near the KHP this year, I had hoped to make all three.

I may have to make the drive down to River Glen, instead of running at Spring Bay. It would extend our training time by a week.

Kudos to Team CEO for making the best of a bad situation! :yes:

ddashaq
Feb. 20, 2010, 11:36 AM
We are to have some snow today, then it is supposed to start raining. Once it rains on the snow, the snow will become a solid chunk of ice.

Opening day for Spring Bay is next week. Unless Mary really dumbs down the course, there is not much of a chance that we will be ready to run. Since there are only three events being run at or near the KHP this year, I had hoped to make all three.

I may have to make the drive down to River Glen, instead of running at Spring Bay. It would extend our training time by a week.

Kudos to Team CEO for making the best of a bad situation! :yes:

I understand! I have not ridden in two weeks which is so frustrating because my horse was coming along so well! I was planning on doing a division or two at Paul Frazer, but now I just don't think that his jumping will be ready.

retreadeventer
Feb. 21, 2010, 09:04 AM
Oh Hilary, I am a former New Englander, and furthermore, I am a former Northern Idahoan/Western Washington Survivor, which actually in my humble opinion, CREAMS New England for winter weather. However Snowmageddon was about as bad as it gets and conditions here are very different due to the 36 degree temps each day. Just enough to melt slowly and pack the snow, not cold enough to powder it and zap the moisture out of it, and not warm enough for a big melt. Very difficult to work with right now, in sort of a weird kind of melting period in my area.

Abracadabra
Feb. 21, 2010, 06:01 PM
we're doing well, here in the "frozen North" i think we've got less snow than ever, and way less than most of the USA. we're riding in all fields, almost every weekend, and down the road. http://glaciercreek.webs.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=70181444

Jleegriffith
Feb. 21, 2010, 06:35 PM
My solution to making 4 yrs that haven't been ridden all winter behave on their first ride back is to make them work in the snow! Here is my ring and it is just a grass ring so very squishy but I am riding- http://dixierumble.wordpress.com/ You can see he is working hard but it isn't to difficult.

I have been riding out there almost every day and have some good paths worn down and yes they are heavy and wet but I am mostly walking with a bit of trotting mixed in. Taking enough breaks to make sure they don't get to tired. We are also hacking out across the fields as well. I live in the same area as retread but I am tough and some of mine are barefoot and can handle the conditions.

When I trailer to the indoor I try to go with two horses and let the quietest one stand first. Ride the one that might be silly and hope they are tired and stand nicely after you take the other horse off. It does teach them patience and they have to do it at shows so it is great to practice over the winter. I did get my trailer out today and went to ride at the local trail center which has lovely sandy trails but the driveway in wasn't plowed. Bummer!

Now the rain is going to make it really awful so it will be the sandy trails or indoor only until it drys up.

retreadeventer
Feb. 21, 2010, 08:33 PM
"I live in the same area as retread but I am tough and some of mine are barefoot and can handle the conditions. "

Really! Took a look at your video and how did you get rid of all your snow? At the moment I have about twice or three times your depth on the ground and more in drifted areas -- floundered today riding in a deep spot about 2 feet high -- No wonder you are riding. If my snow where ankle deep I'd be riding in it too! Mine is still well over a foot deep on average. God must shine the sun on your place more than mine!

Jleegriffith
Feb. 21, 2010, 08:40 PM
We rode and rode and rode on it when it was 3ft deep and it packed down and now is ankle deep. Really it can be done and it's fun:lol: We tried to move some with the tractor but that wasn't happening so I figured if I rode a bit every day on the same path I could pack it down just like the horses did in their fields. It worked pretty well and I think in another day or so the snow will be off the ring because it packed down so much the sun is melting it. It is still pretty deep out on the trails but great conditioning work. We just walk but they are working really hard and I do a lot of 2pt to keep myself in shape. It also helps that there are a few of us riding on it each day and I have some horses that are so fit they trot and canter the path which really packed it down. I also turned my horses out on it to pack it down a bit.

Tried to go to the C&R center but couldn't get in to the one parking lot because the plows pushed everything up in front of the driveway. Oh well the rain might wash a lot of it away.

Looks like warm weather all this week so it will melt. Rode some up and down the driveway today which was boring. I wish my road wasn't so twisty and turny with people driving fast as it would be a bit more interesting to hack down it instead of up and down the driveway.

Ajierene
Feb. 21, 2010, 09:02 PM
I rode for the first time in weeks. Had to wrestle on gate open (between two fields) and went through the primary gate of the first field, instead of the secondary - primary is right by the shed, so annoying to walk in and have two overly curious geldings wanting to say HI.

The big field, where the arena is, is occupied by four horses. Apparently none of those four horses have found the need to venture much past the barn as there was about 6 acres of virgin snow. The arena, of course, was pack and the gate half buried. The drifts in the field were pretty high and the woods was better, but not a whole lot.

I discovered what a 'real dressage' walk may feel like - she was throwing me up in the air getting through the drifts. We trotted a few paces at one point and I thought she would toss me into the snow! The few paces of canter were fine though....canter or walk until the snow melts! We will practice walk/canter transitions.