PDA

View Full Version : Breeding question for event horses



Eventer55
Feb. 18, 2010, 10:07 AM
In looking for a stallion I am finding a few breeders that do not show during breeding season with their stallions.

I bred only 4 times a long time ago and got really great babies. Now have been looking and found a perfect stallion, but my question is why do people not show their stallions when breeding them? I bred my mares to a stallion who would breed in the morning and show that afternoon and win.

So, can anyone breeding potential event horses tell me what you do and why.

foxhavenfarm
Feb. 18, 2010, 10:53 AM
We show during breeding season and have not had any issues. I think it really depends on the individual stallion and their temperament as well as how well they hold their weight during breeding season.

denny
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:13 PM
As someone who competed three stallions I realize, looking back, how lucky I was not to have had liability issues, and this is especially true in eventing, especially in cross-country.

Example---You have a fall. Now you have a loose stallion on a couple of hundred acres, filled with other horses, some of them mares.

And some of those mares being ridden by children, perhaps. And perhaps your loose stallion attacks one of those horses, what about THOSE possible repercussions?

No wonder few stallions in eventing.

Eventer55
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:25 PM
But, I want to know why some breeders promoting any stallion, don't show during breeding season.

I'm trying to avoid a trainwreck, but seriously, if you can't show your stallion during show/event season and breed I want to know why.

So, Denny do you clinic/event/show whatever with Formula one during breeding season?

I want everything when I breed and temperament is one. I understand your point about loose stallions, the show ring is different than a 400 acre field filled with other horses and riders.

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:47 PM
But, I want to know why some breeders promoting any stallion, don't show during breeding season.

I'm trying to avoid a trainwreck, but seriously, if you can't show your stallion during show/event season and breed I want to know why.

So, Denny do you clinic/event/show whatever with Formula one during breeding season?

I want everything when I breed and temperament is one. I understand your point about loose stallions, the show ring is different than a 400 acre field filled with other horses and riders.


It could be a fitness thing as much as a temperament thing. Stallions can drop weight during breeding season. But I suspect it is just a PITA factor. Not everyone wants to juggle managing their time to address collecting, breeding and shipping and also training and showing on top of that. That is a lot of time management when they are also probably managing more that just the stallion (i.e. have a farm, family and other horses).

If you are really trying to compete and be super competitive....you want that to be your focus. Not distracted with breeding appointments on top of that. JMO.

I also personally don't think that would be a key indicator for temperament in offspring.

JER
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:59 PM
I want everything when I breed and temperament is one.

The stallion's temperament isn't as important as the temperament he may or may not pass on to his offspring.

Show facilities can be ridiculously unaccommodating or unsafe for stallions. Do you want to put your stallion in a soft-sided stall next to a mare?

I had this happen to me at a HT with my mare -- and the organizer got very angry at me when I asked to be moved away from the stallion. As it turned out, the stallion's owners saw the stabling set-up, scratched from the competition and took the horse home.

hhfarm
Feb. 18, 2010, 08:14 PM
I know a few stallions who don't thrive while multitasking.... Some are really docile, except in breeding season when you dare not try to compete. Some are fine. We lucked out---at our boy's first horse trial, one of the mares came into season---he did his first dressage test, his first show jumping, drove 3 miles over to the vet clinic to be collected AI, drove back to the horse trial, and finished the competition in the ribbons first time out. I'm spoiled I guess. Some stallions have temperaments that allow for that, but I think many function better other ways. We're also lucky that we have a major vet clinic right down the road, so that helps. We try not to compete out of town in breeding season---but are lucky to have many home events!

Every stallion is different---just like in all the horse world, you do what works! Good luck and happy shopping---what a special, exciting time for you!

Coppers mom
Feb. 18, 2010, 08:34 PM
There are a ton of reasons stallions don't compete during breeding season, and not a single one is his fault. I certainly wouldn't hold it against him.

1) Shows often aren't set up for stabling stallions. Crowded parking areas and flimsy temporary stabling just won't cut it.

2) Shows present a huge liability should something go wrong, and the situation could be made worse by having business on Mr. Man's mind.

3) Mares are an inconvenient bunch. They don't cycle according to our silly plans, they cycle when they darn well please, and Mr. Man needs to be ready to go. If he's out of state for the weekend, that's a problem.

4) Some stallions lose weight during breeding season. Not a big deal, but if you're promoting a stallion, you don't want him out there when he's not at his best.

5) Surround a stallion who's been in the breeding shed twice this week with a bunch of mares in season, and no matter what a doll he is, it's going to mess with him. He'll be distracted, and probably won't do as well. Again, you don't want to have your stallion out for everyone to see if he's not doing his best.

A stallions temperament in the breeding shed really shouldn't have any impact on your decision to breed to him. There was a stallion in the area a while ago that needed 5 people to collect him, and not because it was a complicated task, if you know what I mean. But all of his babies are incredibly gentle and sweet. Your horse is never going to be in quite the same predicament as a breeding stallion, so I wouldn't worry about it.

twistoffate
Feb. 18, 2010, 08:40 PM
My guy shows during breeding season, but like Denny said I'm always worried about x-country should I fall off. My mom comes with me and is under strick orders to grab Trey if something happens. Someone else can tend to me... It's kind of a running joke but at the same time a reality. Trey is very well behaved but loose in a field with mares in heat.... Who would expect a stallion to NOT be tempted.

deltawave
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:24 PM
It doesn't bother me that not many stallions compete actively. Think of tent stabling at an event, a stallion, a bunch of mares, and nobody around at one in the morning. :eek: I'd keep my stallion home, too. :)

I would expect a stallion to have the temperament he was born with, nothing more and nothing less. This can be demonstrated in the most meaningful way by looking at the temperaments of his offspring, not his manners at a horse show or in a breeding shed. No, I would probably not want to breed to a stallion known to be a rank b*st*rd, but more important to me is how his BABIES behave. :)

I guess what I am saying is I can forgive a stallion owner for not going through all the trouble of competing a stallion with all of the potentially bad things that can happen and the inconvenience. In fact, as the owner of mares, I'm grateful to them for keeping their entire boys at home. :)

Also if a stallion is in high demand and shipping semen far and wide, often the call will come and the horse must be collected TODAY, and maybe TOMORROW and THE DAY AFTER as well. This is not only very demanding physically for the stallion, but it's kind of hard to collect one at a horse show. :) And you can't tell an ovulating mare to hang onto that follicle until you get home from a show. :D

midnightride
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:24 PM
no disrespect but if you have never had to deal with a stallion on a daily basis you have no idea what it is like.... some are great, more like geldings that you simply point at a mare and go on with your training....others spend all their time thinking about the girls and getting them focused on training is hard.... this DOES NOT MAKE THEM LESS OF A STALLION!!!!! just harder to do both at once... my current boy loves the girls and is an ASSSSS at home but off the farm is a prefect horse. the guy before was a love, never paid any mind to anything (sadly was too lame to event and is now in CA as a race stud.....).

you can not hold not competing against a stallion...

to be bad- can your husband walk into a strip club with his eyes closed???:lol:

TwinGates
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:42 PM
As someone who competed three stallions I realize, looking back, how lucky I was not to have had liability issues, and this is especially true in eventing, especially in cross-country.

Example---You have a fall. Now you have a loose stallion on a couple of hundred acres, filled with other horses, some of them mares.

And some of those mares being ridden by children, perhaps. And perhaps your loose stallion attacks one of those horses, what about THOSE possible repercussions?

No wonder few stallions in eventing.

Absolutely spot on.

In addition to the points made about the flimsy stalls add required space - if your boy's stall isn't an end-cap, 5 spaces must be "mare-free": one on each side of his stall, the stall immediately behind and those catty-cornered behind him.

Eventer55
Feb. 19, 2010, 08:37 AM
Thanks, when my search began I received many emails, Pms etc and a few did question breeding vs. showing, so hense my question.

I was around quite a few stallions a very long time a ago and I just got lucky as most were all the ho hum type.

And to your credit Denny I read one report on formula One that said he was amazingly calm, surrounded by horses at a clinic. I believe you started breeding him at a young age and he is still a gentleman.

foxhavenfarm
Feb. 19, 2010, 10:46 AM
Absolutely spot on.

In addition to the points made about the flimsy stalls add required space - if your boy's stall isn't an end-cap, 5 spaces must be "mare-free": one on each side of his stall, the stall immediately behind and those catty-cornered behind him.

I guess I am spoiled with our stallion. I do not worry about coming off of him and him going to harass other horses. He would likely go say hello, but is far too much of a gentleman to do anything else. Then again, he is pastured with a group of horses so it's no big thing for him.

I actually have a funny story about temporary stabling as well... in Ocala back in '07 he was stabled next to a mare who was in heat and another mare was behind her sharing a wall. The two mares teased each other over the wall of the stall all weekend and Arty stood with his head in the opposite corner totally ignoring them.