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ctab
Feb. 16, 2010, 11:19 AM
I am stuck at home again due to the weather and feeling very poor ATM. Another day off from work. Add the 2 I missed last week due to weather and I am feeling strapped!
What is your job that lets you pay for your horse hobby?

Jazzy Lady
Feb. 16, 2010, 12:20 PM
I'm a residential designer, meaning that I design high end custom homes. Right now we are doing a neighbourhood on a golf course up here that is spectacular.

It doesn't pay for my sport... It pays for me to keep a horse. That's about it. I supplement it with freelance work doing permit drawings for people.

Bacchus
Feb. 16, 2010, 12:39 PM
Communications Coordinator. Mainly ad design, website updates, brochures, etc. Some writing and editing (used to be an editor for a magazine and a staff writer for this company).

I'm low-level, so no big eventing bills, but I'd get by. I'm very frugal, though.

I could not afford the farm I have now, or four horses, without my husband's income!

Hey Mickey
Feb. 16, 2010, 12:42 PM
I made a thread like this a couple years ago when I first joined COTH when I was trying to decide what to major in so I could get a job to pay for the horse.
It was really interesting. although I'm still floundering around at school.

I'm 21, college student.
I have 4 jobs.
cleaning stalls and whatever else to work off 1/2 my board.
a retail job
2 restaurant jobs, one making pizza's and one working in a kitchen at a bar and grill... and if they don't let me start bar tending soon then I'm going to quit and go find a bar tending job someplace else.

scubed
Feb. 16, 2010, 12:42 PM
Research faculty at major university. My job pays for all of my horse related expenses, but I am fairly frugal in other ways, especially having a mortgage less than my average monthly horse-related costs and a 10 year old small car

inquisitive
Feb. 16, 2010, 12:49 PM
TIBCO Administrator (note I'm still newer so not getting paid as much as my colleagues, hoping for a promotion soon, or looking for a new job)

It sucks but it mostly pays my horse bills (except for larger vet bills that I'm still paying off :() and about half of the mortgage I share with my fiance, as well as groceries and car insurance.

I don't do anything else fun :lol:

The horses are soon moving to my parents' farm where my board will be a bit lower and I hope to get to the point where I'm not skating by...

DiablosHalo
Feb. 16, 2010, 01:14 PM
Soil Conservationist with the USDA. Doesn't support my horse habit though. I have a small farm where I board TB racehorses- that pays all my farm bills and horsey bills. Day job is only for insurance coverage and retirement fund. I always tease and say I go to work to relax!

deltawave
Feb. 16, 2010, 01:19 PM
Cardiologist. Good income, not a whole lot of time to spend it. :sigh: I have very frugal habits as well, other than the farm and all that comes with it including a whopper of a mortgage. :dead: Other than that we are pretty debt-averse and trying to put money away for retirement, which isn't close yet but is "out there". I give myself a horse allowance and try to stick with it. There is no budget for crazy excess in anything, but we are OK.

I spent many, many years on the lower end of low income, and have been in debt and had to work jobs that I hated simply to put gas in the car to drive to another job that I hated. Wouldn't want a job that I didn't like (even love) for any money, and thankfully I enjoyed the LONG road to get here because there were a lot of years where horses were so far on the back burner I couldn't even see them. :( What you learn during those times is that although it's hard to have horses in your life without considerable "disposable" income, it's not impossible. :)

Ishi
Feb. 16, 2010, 01:39 PM
Starting young horses and retraining OTTBs, mainly event horses, with some sales. It doesn't pay my horse bills :lol: I gallop steeplechase horses for the sheer fun of it and to supplement income.

It's not a hobby for me, as I'm a pro, but if I was a very smart pro I would not own my own horses or only have one, instead of 2 retirees and 3 event horses, plus my DH has one greenie and his event horse :D I love my job, I wouldn't trade it for anything in the world, although this weather has been really hard on income as well, no galloping in 2 and a half feet of snow!

Miss Kat
Feb. 16, 2010, 01:41 PM
I am an administrative assistant for a private investigator. I don't make very much, but I live at home with my parents while I save half of my income to return to school. If I had to live on my own and save for school, I wouldn't be able to pay for horses. Luckily, I have support for my basic living expenses and can.

missamandarose
Feb. 16, 2010, 01:56 PM
"campaign associate" for a non profit... which makes me "financially aware" as my trainer calls it. I make enough to cover basic horse costs for one, and pay most of the bills. My husband, who was not foolish enough to work for a NPO, pays the bigger bills, but not for the pony.

I also occasinally cater small parties and I'm a Pampered Chef consultant... which basically supports my Starbucks habit (once a week!):winkgrin:

VicariousRider
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:01 PM
I'm in law school aspiring to a career that will enable me to afford horses even though I will probably have less TIME and more MONEY! :) It's always a trade off....

That's not the only reason that I went to law school, but it was one factor in my decision.

La Chasse
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:10 PM
I am Physician Assistant who just quit my job b/c I literally couldn't take the sh** in my dept & my supervising MD anymore.... Not really into workplace bullying as a "professional motivational tool" :mad: Actively interviewing & working w/ headhunter to find a new position w/ a better fit (know of any jobs out there??)

In the meantime, horse bills + massive grad school loans are paid for by my DH's income & the extra $ from replacing our bimonthly housekeeper with yours truly. Unfortunately, we had planned on finally buying a house this year, but now I don't think we will be able to--love living in the DC area :(

ctab
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:12 PM
Thank again all....
Starting to feel better. Thought it was just me who was on a tight budget ALL the time.
I was a bartender way back in my 20's then I got into being a title closer thru a friend and when 2 kids came along things slowed down. Not long after #2 the real estate market tanked and I just started adding more clients to train as there were less and less closings. It went from a small hobby to help supplement the income to a full time job. I love it but I am limited in the hours I can work. Just trying to tread water until #2 is in Kindergarten and I can work more days....
...but by then I am sure #2, my daughter, will have caught the "bug" and I will looking at ponies! She loves the horses now and gets mad when the pony ride is over. How long does it take to get from 3 to Tadpole? ;-)

dixiedolphin
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:30 PM
I'm a desktop support technician / end-user analyst / IT guru (aka, I fix computers) for a very specialized branch of a large entertainment company. They pay decent and have good benefits, but I think I'm getting lowballed nevertheless (ah well, it's a name that will look good on the resume in five years or so if necessary)

It doesn't pay for horse ownership yet, but it does pay for my lessons and my gear (I'm a re-rider, so I'm upgrading all my personal riding gear that's 10 years old and falling apart). It'll pay for some competition as well, should the opportunity present itself. And once I've finished paying off my debt from my poverty years (steadily chipping away.. just paid off the last of my credit cards last week!), I'll likely be free and clear to finally have a horse of my own (probably in 2012, when the truck is paid off). :D

Fancy That
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:31 PM
I'm 36 and am a Sr. Marketing Programs Manager responsible for Global Demand Generation/Lead Generation for an end-to-end Networking company here in Silicon Valley.

I love my job and it definitely pays the bills quite nicely. However, we are house poor (ranch poor :), so are not rolling in the money by any means!

I am mostly just having fun with the horses and we keep them at home now, so I'm not spending much on competitions or clinics. We do some Hunter Paces, local events, etc. Nothing recognized. My favorite is to just go XC schooling, actually!

Jleegriffith
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:46 PM
Work in HR for the gov't but also do boarding, retraining and sales as a second income.

Ishi is totally right on when she talks about not owning a lot of personal horses:yes: I would be doing quite well in terms of cash flow if I didn't have three of my own and tons of vet bills which have been generated by them trying to kill themselves off.

I am in my late 20's and although money is tight I consider myself very well off for my age and we own our own farm so at least I am building equity in something that is mine. I try to invest every penny that I make and pay off bills before buying anything. It will continue to be a struggle for the next few years but I love the lifestyle so I won't complain. We are house poor so not a lot of showing or other activities but in a few years I think that will all change.

MunchkinsMom
Feb. 16, 2010, 02:54 PM
Full time telecommuter senior systems analyst for a major health insurance company. DH is also in Information Technology and works from home for one or more clients as a consultant. I used to be a programmer, switched to the systems analysis 3 years ago. I've been in this field for 25 years, and have lived very comfortably. I also do some free lance writing for equine publications, for fun and a bit of extra spending cash.

Arcadien
Feb. 16, 2010, 03:12 PM
Independent Finance & Admin Support, specializing in Govt Contractors. Wasn't always fun getting here, put in too many hours in my first 5-10 years, but now I'm reaping the reward - I have carved a niche where I'm in demand and can set my hours and work a lot from home. I'm pulling off the "impossible", small farmette mortgage, 4 horses, one even could afford to board at an indoor this year (thank goodness!) on my single woman's salary. I've made over six figures most of this decade, but I still don't feel "rich", and I watch every dollar! Next year the rig will be paid off, and I can use that extra to fund a nice show season - I might start to feel "rich" then!:D

For you college grads, I got here by coming out of school with a bragworthy GPA in a liberal arts major, sticking with a job I didn't exactly love for long enough to gain respect for "getting the job done", gaining an industry reputation for working well in a team (working with plenty of people I wouldn't give a rat's rear end about in real life, but learning to just "get along" and get the job done, quite a rare and valuable trait I've found, in business :lol:) without causing drama, being very flexible and ready to work with whatever changes where thrown my way.

You'd likely have to put in some 10 years like I did in a certain industry to be able to fly solo like I am now, but if you can find the patience, it may be worth it!

Of course all this was Plan C, when plan A (be born into wealthy horse loving family) and plan B (marry wealthy horse loving man who accidentally keeled over after changing his will) failed to come through for me...:cool:

Kairoshorses
Feb. 16, 2010, 03:22 PM
I've been a secretary, a waitress, taught 8th grade, tutored, been a technical writer, and now I teach rhetoric in a university graduate program. (I have a PhD in BS!) All of the jobs allowed me to have a horse, and now I can actually afford to compete, and my schedule is flexible enough so that I can compete.

mythical84
Feb. 16, 2010, 03:34 PM
I recently started my own equestrian-based PR/Marketing/Development company: At Mythic Landing Events, we offer services within the niche of equestrian events. Our staff is made up of knowledgeable horsewomen who possess many years of experience competing in equestrian sports, so we welcome opportunities to couple our knowledge of the horse world with our skills in event planning and public relations. From large and complex to small and simple, Mythic Landing Events, LLC offers planning, coordination, marketing, development, and public relations services to equestrian clients. Based in the heart of Maryland, we hope to become a household name in the world of equestrian sports.

Simply put ... I love my job. :-D As far as paying for my horse habit, I'm squeaking by right now. But things are looking good for the future ... I hope!

Thomas_1
Feb. 16, 2010, 03:36 PM
Farmer and Equestrian Centre Proprietor. Horse trainer etc etc etc

sunnycher
Feb. 16, 2010, 04:15 PM
I am an Exec. Sales Director with Mary Kay, Inc. for the past 22 years. LOVE my job because of the flexibility. It has provided a great living for our family, now the kids are gone, more horses!!! Great Sunscreen, too.

olympicdreams04
Feb. 16, 2010, 05:06 PM
I break racehorse and sporthorse babies, gallop racehorses, and have a small time racehorse training business. I generally have one solid competition horse that I compete 5-10 times a year and two or three babies the I compete and that are for sale. While the upside is that I have a lot of time in the afternoon to ride and train, the down side to the racing industry is that until Dec 1st, I have always worked 7 days a week. Fortunately, I now work for one of the best farms in the biz and work 5 days a week and make significantly more money (unless of course there is a week long blizzard which does tend to seriously cramp my working style). I still don't believe it, pinch me! Anyway, this seven day a week lifestyle has understandably limited my ability to compete over the past few years. With the exception of last winter (in Aiken, where they have LOTS of One-Day's), I have wintered in Ocala since 2002 and Rick Dunkerton has always been kind enough to schedule my ride times, often on multiple horses, after noon so that I could gallop on saturday's, drive to Rocking Horse, and show. I cannot thank Rick and organizers like him enough for working with those of us that are NOT independantly wealthy! A good bit of time and money that could have been used to compete has gone to traveling over the past few years as well. I figure that the Olympic team median age is usually somewhere around 40 and I have plenty of time to get there, so why hurry? I have one "big" horse that I am bringing up slowly and if he makes 2012, so be it. If not, there are alot more horses and 2016 or even 2014 WEG's to look fwd to.

RAyers
Feb. 16, 2010, 05:20 PM
I am a professor. No, this does not pay for the horse. I have to live frugally as others here do. I live in a rented apartment in a barn and care for the horses there and try to scrounge every penny I can.

I do love my job because where else can I do bone tissue engineering and weapons development at the same time (yes they are related)? Too much fun (especially if you see me or my graduate students running). It is almost as exciting as a big XC course. as the campus safety officer said last week, "Hmm..an explosion in the combustion lab? Who would have guessed?"

Reed

asterix
Feb. 16, 2010, 05:25 PM
I used to work for the fed govt running a website (fun job, actually); then I started a consulting company with two college friends...then eventually on my own...I am an information architect and usability expert, working with mostly public sector clients to reorganize (or build from scratch) their websites to make them easier to use.
It's fun, and I am my own boss. The upside is that when I get the balance right, I make enough to cover my horse habit and at least gesture towards my half of our daily life (not going to pretend I am socking a lot away for retirement right now) AND have flexible hours to ride during daylight, etc.

The downside is that you never know exactly how much you will be working or how much you will be making...it's a bit "exciting" that way. I have been doing this long enough to feel reasonably comfortable that it will all work out over time.

When times are lean, I have more time to ride :D. When I have lots of work, I ride less but get a little cushion for the other times.

In terms of career path, mine was super ziggedy zaggedy -- best advice I can give is to get the best education you can afford while trying not to take on TOO much debt, and put in some time early in your career to really get established, build skills and a network. When I was in my 20s I rode as part of my volunteer "job" coaching an IHSA team. I could never, ever have afforded to own a horse. Eventually, I could. But I'm glad I put in the time to build a professional life.

xitmom
Feb. 16, 2010, 06:10 PM
I've worked for a Fortune 500 company for 27 years (that still shocks me) doing sales and marketing roles. We now have the kids' college paid for, some retirement savings in the bank and I can finally afford to have a horse. I'm able to work from my home office so I no longer need to live in a major metropolitan area where board is about equal to my monthly home mortgage. I will never catch up with the folks who have been riding all along, but I am having a ton of fun trying!

Beam Me Up
Feb. 16, 2010, 06:47 PM
I work in aviation research.
It's interesting work, pays fairly well, but not top echelon.
The best part is that I get to work mostly from home.
The worst part is that it's pretty niche--I used to do IT consulting which was much more widely available.

It does pay for the horses, though they are always on a serious budget too. I am really cheap in non-horse areas of life (cars, clothes, entertainment).

This year I bought a little farm so now I also have a boarder, who supplements my horses' living costs a bit.

I'm 32, hope to be a bit more comfortable in a few years. The first year with the farm was as rough as everyone promised it would be.

deltawave
Feb. 16, 2010, 06:49 PM
I just have to say that there are at least half a dozen job titles here that make me go "HUH?". :) I'm glad people are including descriptions, because things like "information architect and usability expert" just don't compute with me. :) :) :)

TxEventer81
Feb. 16, 2010, 06:51 PM
I'm in law school aspiring to a career that will enable me to afford horses even though I will probably have less TIME and more MONEY! :) It's always a trade off....

That's not the only reason that I went to law school, but it was one factor in my decision.

Exact same... Though I've wanted to be a lawyer since I was 10.

Ruperman
Feb. 16, 2010, 06:53 PM
I just got a job! (Maybe) I'm on trial basis for marketing Odor-No-More. The people there are great, and it's helping me pay for my best friend!! It's also super fun to go see other barns and meet more horsey friends! (If you're in SC and want free samples, let me know!) One day, (hopefully sooner rather than later) I'll be a dermatologist. In theory, I'll be able to pay for riding and have time to ride as well as gallivant off with Doctors Without Borders. :)

woodrwo
Feb. 16, 2010, 07:23 PM
Banker (the good kind...small community bank). I am a Trust officer and portfolio manager. Nice salary but hubby needed to pay some of the bills. Very frugal on the horse side. Hardest part is to steal time to ride. I am blessed with a job I love and a boss who allows me flexibility to ride. Best part is that I have many clients who are horse people!

ss3777
Feb. 16, 2010, 07:46 PM
On a great day..... I sell a horse farm. Most days I work mornings at a local event barn, pick up my son from school late afternoons and head to the family farm for afternoon chores. After 13 years of wireless and pharma sales, I finally shed the golden handcuffs for the great outdoors :) Sometimes it is feast and sometimes famine but no regrets!!

jcschoeler
Feb. 16, 2010, 07:53 PM
I'm a web designer, graphics artist, news writer/photographer, researcher and whatever else takes to buy more cookies for my horse...yes, it's a luxury but also a passion.

ACMEeventing
Feb. 16, 2010, 07:54 PM
Nurse Anesthetist. Long road to get there but worth every moment. Grew up poor (I know, walked uphill to school - both ways, ate dirt and was glad for it, blah blah blah . . . ), spent all week as a kid mucking stalls or doing whatever for a lesson on saturday.

In my late 30's finally could afford to buy my own horse. Now in my 40's and I guess if 1 is good 3 must be better, right? Geez, if I didn't have such a big barn bill I might actually get some of that retirement saved for :yes:

Oh, and silly me went and got 2 out of 3 daughters bit by the horse bug, too. Hmmmn . . . boys or horses? Horses it is.

eventer_mi
Feb. 16, 2010, 07:57 PM
I'm with Lynn on this one - why didn't my guidance counselor tell me about these jobs in HS?!?!?:D. When I was growing up, I thought you basically had these choices: teacher, doctor, policeman, lawyer, nurse, business person.

So, of course, I'm a teacher. I teach 9th grade English at an inner city high school. I LOVE it. No, it doesn't pay the bills, so thank God that I'm married to an Army officer who DOES pay the bills. My meager income goes towards the "extras" we have, which include our one horse and our bike habit (that's bicycles, not motorcycles). We also have a small company that sells bikes that he designs and I do the graphics package for, but that isn't up to paying for itself yet - what do they say about spending money to make money? I used to have two horses and barely made ends meet, and hated having to decide which pony got the full set of shoes that season, so I sold him (still regret it) and now just have the one, and STILL have no money left for competition, and barely enough for lessons. Oh well. I look at other military families whose husbands rank below mine (we all know what our military spouses make - it's public knowledge) and wonder how on earth they can afford what they do and the horses they have. Mr. Eventer-MI and I put a lot away for retirement, which SHOULD be around the corner in about 4-6 years, depending on how long he wants to stay active duty.

I consider ourselves quite comfortable at the age of 38, but we a) don't have kids, b) have only one horse, and c) are dual-income with very steady jobs.

corgigirl14
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:20 PM
Upon graduating College took a job with a local ABC TV station as an early morning news anchor. My hours were 3 AM to Noon; I was on air live (broadcasting to roughly 150,000 people) from 5:30 to 7AM Monday thru Friday. Thought I wanted to be the next Katie Couric but changed my mind. Horrible hours, working every Holiday, terrible money (I shopped at Goodwill), and too much drama!

Changed careers and have been a pharmaceutical sales rep for the last 5 years. It's a sales job so I live and die by the numbers but it affords me the ability to ride and show my Pony!

elysian*fields*farm
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:22 PM
I've retired from two careers--- I was a journalist for about 15 years before becoming a secondary school teacher after my husband passed away
in 1989. I taught until May 2009. Now I do some tutoring, and freelance writing and photography. I will be offering basic riding and horse care lessons in the spring, as well. I have ridden horses since I was about five years old, and have owned them most of my adult life. Have horses, have to be able to support them.

Flipper
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:34 PM
Wow, what an interesting, diverse group here! Who knew that there were teachers of Rhetoric??!!
I've been a Vet. tech for 15 yrs in various places. Having the vet discount REALLY helps support the horse/dog/goat habit, and that's about it! Having no 2 legged kids helps with the budget, as does the hubby's job... and his bike-racing hobby doesn't kill the budget like the ponies do ;)

skip916
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:39 PM
i love reading these!

I have a degree in art education and taught middle school art for two years before I realized I missed science. I originally had planned to go to vet school but a year into animal science undergrad I realized my SEVERE allergy to ruminant animals wasn't going to allow that. (if only you could just study horses!) So I changed my major and voila, art education degree since art was my other passion. Now, I have decided to go back to school for nursing, (long term plan is nurse anesthetist or nurse educator) where I am currently juggling school days full of organic chem., biochem., anatomy and physiology etc. from 8-3, then nannying from 4-7, and squeezing in training my ottb whenever i get a chance! Luckily, i only have school a few days a week so I have decent time to ride.

I also design and make jewelry, do repairs and string pearls, and do equine portraiture on a commission basis- which pays for shows/lessons. My meager nanny salary pays the board/hay/grain and I babysit/pet-sit/house-sit and teach HB lessons to kids when possible to try to supplement nanny salary since I also pay for utilities, my car, dogs, and grocery expenses and sweet husband pays for mortgage, health insurance and car insurance! I also help friends plan parties, events and weddings when needed- which is super fun for me!

It's definitely a struggle to get everything paid for, but I don't use CC anymore and am trying to pay it off so my only debt will be car and small student loan! I budget endlessly but it's worth it because my favorite time spent ever is with my husband, horse and dogs, so it's worth the daily money stress! My horse was a gift from my grandmother so at least the initial investment was taken care of! Jazz, the horse, is the best therapy ever and nothing else matters when I'm hanging with her so I'd rather have her taken care of and get my debit card declined for trying to buy breakfast this morning (eek) for myself, than give her up.

I have zero savings and retirement and that scary financial advisor woman on TV would killlll me, but once school is finished, I hope to turn that around!

It's nice to hear that others have been through lean times as well! One day the nursing salary will hopefully pay for my real dream- which is a career with horse show and event planning and a barn of my own! My husband laughs at me and says, "you are the only person I know that could plan a wedding, make the jewelry for the bride, train the dog to be the ring-bearer, resuscitate the groom, and have the children arrange the flowers when the florist doesn't show, while tending to the carriage horses" which makes me laugh, and makes me realize that all my hard work will pay off one day!

-ellie

JER
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:50 PM
Writer.

I've been making stuff up for a long, long time. I used to write movies and TV which was quite stressful and demanding but the money was great. Because I never really cared for the business end of the job (I didn't even own a TV), I always had an exit plan. Basically, my plan was to earn enough money to do the things I really wanted to do but wouldn't afford me a life with horses.

Now, I've just finished my first novel and I'm also a licensed EMT, working my way toward paramedic certification. I volunteer with a medical relief organization and I'll happily work in the ER overnight for $10/hr. Next month, I'm going back to work on a TV show to teach actors how to play medical relief workers on TV. It's all fun now.:)

Aside from my horses, I'm not a big spender. My retirees live with me and don't cost much. My younger ones are a little more expensive right now.

WW_Queen
Feb. 16, 2010, 09:02 PM
Wow some great job titles on here! Definitely a diverse group. :)

I was in marketing/admin/executive support for 5-6 years, then after my last company downsized, I was left floundering for "what next". I have a B.A. in English (Minor in Law) and becoming a professional admin person wasn't on my life's "To Do" list. :lol:

I sort of fell into online journalism, and am now working from home which is wonderful!

I can't really say it pays all my horse bills (just yet!) but my hubby is lucky to have a fabulous job he loves that pays through the ears so despite his lackluster enthusiasm for my sport (and the costs associated with it) he does he best to help me out. :D

kkindley
Feb. 16, 2010, 10:14 PM
I'm a Heavy Mobile Equipment Operator II. That's fancy talk for military test dummy! I work for a contractor on a military instilation and we test everything the military uses, before they can use it. Anything from M-1 tanks to kitchens to body armor. I get to drive things around on courses and see if they break. Sometimes I have the best and the worst job in the world, at the exact same time. I've been there for about 3 and a half years now. For being 26 and no college, it pays very well. I have been able to start college this past fall (p/t of course!) and get back into horses. I was out of them for almost 5 years because out of high school I broke racehorses for a year and then worked on a dairy farm for 4 years. About 2 years into milking cows, I just couldn't afford my horse and put him in a lease situation which turned out horrible and I would up having to sell him for a fraction of what he had been worth. Im fortunate with this job now to be able to afford some toys like my horse and motorcycle.

eventing addict
Feb. 16, 2010, 10:26 PM
WOW, this is very interesting!

Good timing... I'm SO thrilled that I just became the new County Saddlery Representative for North Carolina. After completing the Master Saddlers Association training I am working to develop what will hopefully be a long and happy career.

After graduating from college I was sure that I wanted to support my "eventing addiction" in an office, wearing heels and pant suites with no mud, flies or sweat. It didn't even take a year for me to realize that was not the route for me. I desperately wanted to be back in the barn with horses and horse people!! So here I am... :D

- Beth

oharabear
Feb. 17, 2010, 01:38 AM
I WAS a retail loss investigator (I mainly investigated employee theft, caught them, and sent them to jail and collected restitution, although I also dealt with check and credit card fraud and regular shoplifters. Dishonest employees were my specialty, though) until the company I worked for went belly-up last year. It did pay the bills. It was a blast. I had a super-flexible schedule (I could pretty much make my own schedule, as long as I hit 40 hours by the end of the week). I had 5 horses. I loved my job and usually couldn't wait to get to work in the morning.

However, it was actually a really good thing that I lost my job (besides having to downsize to 3 horses :cry:) because my old company's displaced workers all received a grant from the government that would pay for a year of college. So, I only had 2 more years to go to get my bachelor's (I only had my associate's degree when I got my cool and very fun investigator job), I got one paid for, and the last one I am doing the student loan thing (I figure that only 1 year of student loans beats the heck out of 4 year). I am majoring in biology, and am considering getting my master's in education, but I'm not sure yet.... I just love love love my science classes.

BUT, I am being very conservative with the horses right now. Just local schooling shows once in a blue moon. Hopefully I can pick it back up again when I graduate. :yes:

BlueRidgeEventer
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:06 AM
This thread's fun!

I'm a part-time lawyer, part-time local horse professional.

I just got back into practicing law last June after taking three years off to do the horse-thing full time. I love being back in the legal field and am getting ready to branch out on my own as a solo practitioner (yikes, scary!). I like being part-time in both worlds because the law job let's me contribute to our household income (thank goodness for a wonderfully supportive husband) and and horse job allows me to work in something that I'm passionate about.

pegasusmom
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:43 AM
In my late 30's finally could afford to buy my own horse. Now in my 40's and I guess if 1 is good 3 must be better, right? Geez, if I didn't have such a big barn bill I might actually get some of that retirement saved for :yes:



Hey ACME - if you'd hurry up and build, you could have a big mortgage like the rest of us instead of a big barn bill!

A degree in Medical Technology and various jobs in hospital labs funded my original passion of showing purebred dogs. Money making schemes since then include stints as a legal assistant, assistant to an independant insurance adjuster and business officer manager for a retirement home. For the last 9+ years work as organizer of first one, then two, then five horse trials helped float competition horses.

At present, I am playing "kept woman", being extremely fortunate to be married (for over 32 years) to a career Army officer. He retired from active duty in July of 2009 and returned immediate to service as a Department of the Army civilian in the Special Ops arena. Several major changes here just mean I am embarking on the next big adventure in my life, that of co-owner of an upper level event horse, and in the meantime, waiting to see what awaits around the corner.

IFG
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:48 AM
Another research professor in a medical school. I am an epidemiologist. I focus on evaluating new medical technologies (diagnostic imaging-CT, MR, PET), exploring the consequences of diffusing technologies, and examine research design issues. I love it. As for paying for the horse thing, it was doing pretty well until I got both daughters hooked, and now I am getting ready to pay for two tuitions (twins).

To cut costs for a few years, and be able to afford a second horse when my current one decides he wants to retire (which fortunately has not happened yet at age 18), we moved the horse home. We are still paying off the construction costs, but once they are paid off, we are set. Not fancy, dirt paddock, but horse is fat and happy.

We also live frugally. What is a vacation? What is dinner out? But we are happy.

Catalina
Feb. 17, 2010, 08:50 AM
Supervisor at a medical research lab doing new drug research. I love my job and the people I work with a all great. It pays for my 5 horses and the competitions and half the mortgage and bills on the farm (hubby pays the other half). Sure, I have no money at the end of the month, but we don't go on vacations (we are both homebodies), don't eat out much, don't spend a lot on clothes, cars, etc.

ACMEeventing
Feb. 17, 2010, 09:09 AM
Hey ACME - if you'd hurry up and build, you could have a big mortgage like the rest of us instead of a big barn bill!


.

Working on it!

Oh and congrats on your recent big finish! Not bad for their first time out :yes:

Carried Away
Feb. 17, 2010, 09:23 AM
I'm an Equine Insurance Agent, and I absolutely love it! I have always looked for a way to combine horses and a career, and after giving the trainer thing a try, I realized that there are better ways to make a living and still be involved with horses.

I love my job because I get to talk with and help all kinds of horse people from every discipline you can think of, and it has really broadened my horizons of the horse world. I get to keep up with show results, new technology for treating lameness/illness, and what's going on with the sale market.

I can't say that I knew this position even existed when I was trying to decide what to do with my life, as my degree is in Communications and I wanted to be on the news :)

I feel very lucky to have found this career, and once I get my #%$^ credit card bills paid off, I'll be able to get a new horse and actually have the time and $ to event!

circusponydreams
Feb. 17, 2010, 09:42 AM
I'm the managing editor of a small academic journal, and I do a variety of things for the non-profit that owns the journal - memberships, some event planning, bookkeeping, etc. On the plus side, my schedule is flexible and my dog comes to work with me. The salary is firmly in the minus column, but with some barn work and tutoring on the side, it's enough to full lease, take lessons and do a few shows a year if I plan right.

tarheelmd07
Feb. 17, 2010, 09:55 AM
I'm a psychiatry resident - halfway through my 3rd year (of 4), so the light at the end of the tunnel is in sight :winkgrin: Doing horses on a resident's salary has been tough...but hoping it gets easier when I'm done!

FuzzyTB
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:37 AM
Currently going to school to be a nurse which will be my third career since college. I started out as a logistics officer in the Navy, got out after 5 yrs and went to work for a very large oil company in Houston as a financial analyst. The pay was fantastic but I was absolutely miserable! While I made enough money to have a horse, I had absolutely no time. After about two yrs there, I quit, moved home, and started nursing school which should give me the time to ride and the Navy reserves should give me the money to do the horses. I'm very debt averse so no horse yet but I plan on starting lessons this spring and maybe look for a lease situation in about a yr. I can almost see the light!

Long Shadow Farm
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:37 AM
I run the front office and do some light teching for a physical therapy clinic. Doesn't pay a ton, but pretty good for the rural area that I live in. Luck for me, I got my property for a steal 7 years ago and I can keep my horses at home with me. I board a horse or two to help pay for the feed bills. I am getting married in April, so I am hoping that I will be able to show more once we get our budgets combined and figured out. Plus I am going to be getting my equine appraiser (sp?) license soon, so I am hoping to make enough money on the side to help with all the horsey bills.

Bobbi

hey101
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:21 AM
What a fun thread! Such a diverse group.

I'm an engineer (chemical) in the pharmaceutical and nutritional industry. I started out at a major pharma company doing product tech transfer, manufacturing scale-up from R&D to production, and capital project execution (basically, leading teams that build drug manufacturing plants). I now work on both drugs and nutritional products and focus only on one aspect of manufacturing which is film-coating. Basically the coatings that are on the pills you take, I figure out which coating to put on them and how to get them on there! Sounds weird, doesn't it. But it pays really well, is interesting, and I can definitely support my horse habit on my own, hubby's income not withstanding (I have this weird thing about...if he and I went our separate ways tomorrow (no chance of that! ;)), that i could fully support every single horsey thing that I do now on my own besides all the other life stuff. I supported myself for years before we were married and if I had to, I could do the same again. Just me being fiercly independent!).

I have always traveled a LOT for my various jobs- world-wide when I was with big pharma, but now just Texas and west plus British Columbia.
Most of the time I love my job but sometimes it just pays the bills. And since I had my daughter a year ago, and will be having another (and final) child at the end of July, the travel is seriously dragging on me. Fortunately I live in a very biotech/ pharma-concentrated area (SoCal) so I'm kinda tossing the idea around of finding something similar but with a lot less travel in a few months.

TBEquine
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:34 AM
Which job? :)

My "real" job is litigation attorney. I practice Equine Law and Insurance Defense - my favorite cases are a combination of the above!

I'm also an adjunct professor at a local college teaching Intellectual Property law (copyright, trademark, etc.), a nearly burned out volunteer officer with our local eventing association, the alumni representative for our IHSA region, and a National Examiner for USPC. Whew!

I'm fortunate to work at a firm that supports my outside interests, allows me time off to compete, and doesn't mind my crazy schedule as long as it doesn't interfere with my work or trial calendar. It takes some strategic planning to fit everything in, and unfortunately, I usually only get to ride on the weekends, but life is good - stressful most of the time - but good.

Its not all roses, though. My student loans put a HUGE burden on us. I went to a private law school and had an unrealistic vision of what I'd make my first few years out of school, so I racked up some unnecessary debt that's finally almost paid off. The student loans will be with us until I die (or at least it feels that way). The professor job is my "play money" for my horse habit. I ride and compete on a shoe-string budget at the moment. I have an OTTB (and my retired guy), small trailer, saddles I got for my 12th and 16th birthdays (says a LOT for the craftsmanship of those saddles!), and I'm an avid ebayer. I think I'd go insane without my horses, so my husband considers it "therapy expense." And, no kids yet, so this could all change!

wildlifer
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:50 AM
Aquatic wildlife biologist.

Not a ton of money (I work for state government), so I'm always on a tight budget. But then, you don't become a biologist for the money, LOL, you do it for the passion and the love of it. I cover the mortgage on my small house and I get by and can do a few events and shows every year thanks to a gift from my mother. But the feds paid for my grad school, I have no debt aside from the mortgage, and a truck and trailer to get me where I want to go.

Pros: I'm a field biologist so when the water is warm enough, I am outside in rivers and streams catching fish and mussels. It's a blast. Unless the boat breaks down, then I am sitting in the boat cursing and kicking it. I hate boats. Winter is downtime, so I have heaps of free time. My schedule is flexible and I wear jeans and flipflops to the office and all my work clothes and equipment are paid for.

Cons: Summer is really busy with lots of travel for field work. Hard as a single person w/ animals to care for, but I have fabulous farm two miles away where I board my horse. And doing something you deeply believe in and care for means it's hard not be very emotionally invested in your work as you watch people thoughtlessly destroy things every day. I can only afford one horse at a time.

deltawave
Feb. 17, 2010, 01:11 PM
that scary financial advisor woman on TV Off topic, but God, she is a FREAK. We do save, we do budget, we have disability insurance, and she'd STILL look down her nose at our spending habits. :rolleyes: You have to live for today AND tomorrow. :)

Janet
Feb. 17, 2010, 02:02 PM
Hard to give it a title.
Systems/Service Engineer. Consultant. Beltway Bandit.

My undergrad degree is in Math,and my graduate work (ABD) is in Operations Research.

LuckyStar
Feb. 17, 2010, 02:20 PM
Great thread!

I'm a college student and waitress. I have an incredibly humble home. My horse bills outweigh my house bills and I basically only buy clothes at thrift stores, but wouldn't have it any other way! Hoping to one day graduate and be able to combine the horse and house payment :)

SueCoo2
Feb. 17, 2010, 02:28 PM
Law Firm Administrator and Senior Trial Paralegal.

I work for a great boss who is big into polo, but is just really learning about horses (and their appropriate care). :yes:

blackwly
Feb. 17, 2010, 02:32 PM
I'm with Lynn on this one - why didn't my guidance counselor tell me about these jobs in HS?!?!?:D. When I was growing up, I thought you basically had these choices: teacher, doctor, policeman, lawyer, nurse, business person.



Ha! This is me exactly. So I am a doctor. My fiance is a "business person" who doesn't take kindly to that title so I have had to learn to say, "executive director mumble mumble venture capital mumble mumble early stage" while gesturing with my hands when someone asks me what he does.

Beau's mom
Feb. 17, 2010, 02:38 PM
Fascinating thread. Clinical social worker. Now a supervisor at a public mental health clinic. While our girls are in college, I moonlight at a private practice 2 nights a week. DH is a social worker at the VA. Together we pay the bills, including board for 2 horses and his bicycle habit. No car payments (old cars/truck) and a modest house in a blue collar neighborhood. When we launch the kids, who knows…I have a hankering for a newer truck and trailer!

hearthorse
Feb. 17, 2010, 02:50 PM
Dance teacher. I started my own studio 3 years ago. Perfect job for a horse person. I work afternoons and late evenings, so I have almost all day everyday to spend at the barn. I always knew I had to have a job that allowed me to spend as much time as I wanted at the barn with my horse. Im pretty frugal to be able to keep up my horse habit. Anytime I think about spending money on non horse related things I measure it by how many lessons, events,etc it would be equal to. The horse stuff always wins out to the normal people purchases. Just another horse addict here.

texang73
Feb. 17, 2010, 03:16 PM
I'm a High School art teacher... the time off is great, even though I usually have to work summer school to pay bills *sigh*

cgray0983
Feb. 17, 2010, 03:33 PM
I am an Executive Assistant for a Private Equity shop by day, and a graphic designer/photographer by night and over the weekends. And even with that it is a struggle in my area to support my horsey habit. (I don't only do equine related graphics and photography, I also do web and print design for corporate events), but also do fun stuff like design for the below, HorseEden. This only allows me to keep one horse (albeit lame and in semi-retirement) happy in a pasture and stall at night. I offer out my services as a rider to a local private stable who is letting me "borrow" a horse in exchange for teaching him how to be normal - i.e. not an OTTB that can only w/t/c with one lead.

My boyfriend whom I live with is also a horse addict and works at a "Major Social Networking Site" as a UI engineer. That supports his habit quite well - although he is struggling with the idea of purchasing a new very large home desktop or saving towards a new horse - decisions, decisions. I wish I would have gone into his field - the jobs in Silicon Valley are everywhere and they seem to be pretty flexible.

Edit: Sorry for all of you unfamiliar with tech lingo. UI = user interface

Tamsin
Feb. 17, 2010, 03:39 PM
I'm a college professor, a job I absolutely love. The pay job flexibility is fabulous and the pay is pretty great too. However, I don't recommend this career to young folks who can't get by without horses even temporarily. I went through many years of college, grad school, and postdoc positions when I was way too busy to have a horse and of course way too poor. Now the horse related bills (two horses, a daughter who competes locally) are manageable. But I have a kid in college and one headed there next year and these bills are CRIPPLING. Good thing college is temporary.

rivenoak
Feb. 17, 2010, 06:58 PM
I am a Registered Representative with a large investment company. My home job is with the mutual fund side; I'm currently interning on the brokerage side.

But what I actually do is write and edit e-mails and letters to shareholders and prospective investors.

My income pays my debts, personal and son's expenses, 50% of the food bill, and allows me to board one horse. I feel lucky to have her and be able to hunt weekly and have a lesson monthly.

DH is a bankruptcy attorney. However, he didn't make good money until a year ago. He's on the verge of taking a 50% pay cut to leave private practice. His income pays the mortgage, all utilities, his expenses, building up a down payment fund for a new house, and 50% of the food bill. He is also a high school hockey coach and that money probably covers his fuel to practice/games.

In 5 years or less, all of my debts (small CC balance, car note, personal loan) except for my student loans will be paid. DS will no longer be in fulltime daycare. I will feel SO rich. :yes:

We already contribute to our retirement. We could do a bit more, but...

We live in a tiny house in the very wrong part of town.

We don't really vacation. If we have friends to stay with somewhere, we go places for a few days. Our last big vacation together was 5 or 6 years ago to New Zealand and Fiji. My folks paid the airfare. We used our tax return to pay for everything else.

I will do just about anything else that works into my schedule for extra money: model for life drawing classes, braiding, clipping, working at horse trials, arbitraging saddles, etc.

deltawave
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:08 PM
model for life drawing classes Maybe this spin-off should be held on Off Topic day, but I wonder what is the most ridiculous, crazy, or embarrassing thing other COTHers have done to support their horse habits? :D I was an underwear model. A LONG time ago when I could pull it off. :p :lol: :D :lol:

IFG
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:21 PM
I have to say, I think that the assistant to the Private Detective sounds way fun, but I have probably watched too much Remington Steele....

Peggy
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:40 PM
Chem prof at a community college. More teaching than at a 4-year college, but no research requirement and thus more control of your life. Enough seniority that I can kind-of pick my schedule so I work mostly late afternoons and nights. Two months of summer off every year. Option of teaching a six-week winter session for extra income, which is my show money.

Great job working with smart articulate people. Boring meetings, but you can avoid many of them if you're careful about what you commit to. Horrible parking. Essentially no dress code.

Minimum is a master's degree, but they pretty much won't hire anyone to teach in certain departments (including mine) without a PhD. Generally pretty competitive job pools. I think the last time we hired there were about sixty applicants.

I have enuf money to keep a horse in training and go to shows. I don't go to as many shows as some people, but those people generally have to work more to make their money and I often get to ride their horses while they are at work. Own a small house but cannot afford to live in the community in which I teach. I drive a lot.

I had a horse but did not show as an undergrad. Essentially did not ride in grad school. Got a horse while a postdoc, but lived at home, did all my own barn work, showed locally for the most part (as in, ride horse to show) and groomed at the few away shows I went to.

mkevent
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:44 PM
I was in pharmaceutical sales for 17(?) years. About 12 of those years I worked part time, and it payed for the horses, the trailer, the barn and all the big time spending involved in owning a farm. I also had the time to ride! The pay was great but the pressure was intense. When I lost the last job 2 years ago, I decided that I was never going back.

For the past 2 years, I've been doing retiree boarding at my farm. It *just* pays for my horses basic expenses, but nothing more. I'm hoping my tack cleaning skills will earn enough extra income so I can afford lessons and some competitions.

I'm very lucky DH pays all the expenses except for the horse related ones, otherwise I wouldn't be able to do this. We're also careful on what we spend-we live comfortably but sensibly.

After all those years in corporate America, I am so happy to be mucking stalls and taking care of the horses here. I also have some really great boarders, so it all makes it really worthwhile!

Bey Gdancer
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:59 PM
This is a great thread. I always find it interesting to see what people in the horse world do for a living. I am a Study Director at a CRO (contract research organization). We basically do drug development work for all phases - from discovery to market for pharmaceutical/biotech companies. I really like my job and the industry however there are some days I think that I would like to be out and about instead of in an office...

Flipper
Feb. 17, 2010, 08:27 PM
Aquatic wildlife biologist.



Oooooh, can I work for you?!?

jump4me
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:27 PM
I'm in school, I'm farm manager of a TB racing farm, still in the learning-the-ropes of being manager, but it pays awesome and I learn a LOT. I also house, farm, and pet sit, and occasionally do other odd jobs for the people who are my regular customers... I used to clean stalls at another barn too but I quit recently because the horses weren't being handled enough by the owner/manager, and it was getting dangerous, and besides it didn't pay all that well anyway.

rivenoak
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:29 PM
I was an underwear model. A LONG time ago when I could pull it off. :p :lol: :D :lol:

Underwear model, huh? :p

So far, we're the only ones admitting we've taken off our street clothes for money. Is that good, bad, or an indication that we're the most honest ones?!:o:eek::lol:

quietann
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:48 PM
I'm very lucky DH pays all the expenses except for the horse related ones, otherwise I wouldn't be able to do this. We're also careful on what we spend-we live comfortably but sensibly.


I'm in a similar situation. I'm a part-time biostatistician at a university often referred to as "WGU" for "World's Greatest University." I earn enough to pay for my horse hobby, clothes etc. and also get us benefits since DH is an independent consultant.

quietann
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:51 PM
Underwear model, huh? :p

So far, we're the only ones admitting we've taken off our street clothes for money. Is that good, bad, or an indication that we're the most honest ones?!:o:eek::lol:

Back in the Dark Ages, when I was in graduate school, I earned GOOD money as a "pelvic model" for medical students learning to do pelvic exams. Good money for being flat on my back and giving, um, feedback to some of the more ham-handed ones.

The oddest thing that ever happened was when a male medical student from, um, a culture where men and women are kept separated, when confronted with my, well, you know in all its glory, got very lightheaded and had to go sit down in a chair in the hall. I never found out if he actually became able to perform a pelvic exam...

RnR
Feb. 17, 2010, 10:57 PM
I'm a college professor, a job I absolutely love. The pay job flexibility is fabulous and the pay is pretty great too. However, I don't recommend this career to young folks who can't get by without horses even temporarily. I went through many years of college, grad school, and postdoc positions when I was way too busy to have a horse and of course way too poor. Now the horse related bills (two horses, a daughter who competes locally) are manageable. But I have a kid in college and one headed there next year and these bills are CRIPPLING. Good thing college is temporary.

AHA! I always knew my parents were getting the better end of the bargain we made. I'm a college student, and the agreement was that as long as I maintain my 100% scholarship I have now, they will happily pay for both of my horses.

And I thought I was getting such a good deal here...

Haha, just kidding, I am so lucky to have them pay for my horses, because lord knows I couldn't afford it on my own. I work as a tutor, babysitter, house sitter, horse stall cleaner, exercise rider, and during the winter, I get lucky with the occasional body clipping job. During the summers, I normally pick up one more job at a photonics company. The money made goes towards college books, living expenses, and horse shows, because the my parents only put money up for the horses board and feed.

If I ever lose the scholarship... I'll really be in a bind! :eek:

JER
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:29 PM
Back in the Dark Ages, when I was in graduate school, I earned GOOD money as a "pelvic model" for medical students learning to do pelvic exams. Good money for being flat on my back and giving, um, feedback to some of the more ham-handed ones.

There is no money that good. :lol:

ClassAction
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:46 PM
Graduate student!

Right now I don't have my own horse (though there's a horse at the barn I've appropriated in my mind) but I take lessons, clinics and will be showing this summer.

I'm lucky lucky lucky to be in the sciences, pathobiology to be exact, so that I my tuition is covered and I get a stipend. It's nothing huge but allows me to live, eat non-ramen foods and ride.

I think I want to teach after I post-doc. Or I might sell my soul to big pharma, I'm not sure yet :)

slp2
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:02 AM
I work as a corporate training manager for a workers comp insurance company. But lately, it seems like I am mostly designing e-learning programs. ;) Between me and my hubby (an environmental engineer) it pays for my outrageous horse hobby. We live in a depressed (and sometimes depressing) region so housing and land is affordable. We are DINK's and do not go on elaborate vacations. We keep our cars until they are complete hooptee's (sp?) and then buy used as replacements. I did buy my truck new though (because that hauls the precious cargo around) and this year, I bought a pretty fancy trailer. :D We try to save up and buy all cars and trailers with cash--so we don't have any loans but our mortgage. I used to only have one horse, so board, showing, and lessons were not a strain on the budget. I bought another horse this year so I will probably cut back on the out of state shows (and the youngster doesn't really need to show this year--just go along for the ride!)

ZiggyStardust
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:15 AM
I work as a supervisor in hedge fund of fund operations, our primary task is to value the net assets for several dozen FoF.

Covers the horse expenses pretty well, but I am frugal in several other areas; there are always trade-offs. I also work fairly long hours.

I have the same philosophy as the poster who wants to always be able to cover all her own expenses independently, so my work ethic is possibly a little overkill, but that's ok.

purplnurpl
Feb. 18, 2010, 10:19 AM
I'm a bio medical research lab manager.

I love it. It pays OK. Enough that I think at the end of this year I'm going to give up on the horses and have a real life--and ride horses for pure joy.
Non working weekends, my one horse to compete as I will--and I won't have to ride if I don't feel like it. (wow, feels good to say that)

Right now I work every weekend to make enough money for lots of fun shows. But I have no life and I don't get to play with friends. I'm tired of just getting by.

I prefer not to go further with my education, I like being the "go-for" in the lab. I do what my Ph.Ds and Grand Student need me to do. They have the tough side of it. I bought them an easy button for Christmas this year.
I would rather make an OK income with low/no job stress than make a high income and have mental bills for therapy. : )

Jazzy Lady
Feb. 18, 2010, 10:33 AM
Purp,

that's essentially what I've done. My horse has been a pleasure horse. We xc schooled once after May of last year. We did a small CT at training and prelim. This year I'd like to see if I can get back to I and do a **, but I don't think it's realistic and I'm enjoying my horse as just a pet and friend.

I gotta tell you, although I miss the competing, it's so nice to have a social life and enjoy other things again.

Posse977
Feb. 18, 2010, 12:06 PM
Public safety specialist. LOL! Police Officer/Firefighter/Paramedic/Park Ranger/Dispatcher...

I have a BS in Medical technology and worked in the field for about 12 years. Also worked as the Shipping/Receiving Manager for an international western wear catalog/retail company. Got sick of all of it and worked as the technical support coordinator for a digital dictation/transcription company. Got moved into sales, yuck!, and went into pharmaceutical drug development research. Decided that was boring too, and went to police academy at 31yo. Got a PT job and got exposed to fire-rescue. Looked like fun, so I got my EMT-B and went to fire academy. No use not doing it all the way, so I got my 'medic as well. Learned to dispatch for fun- and it helped out my PD. I am now 41. I love my jobs and am seldom bored.

My jobs pay for the 3 horses (1 retiree, 1 competitive/working horse, and one youngster), the vehicle insurance, and whatever bills I have- like cellphone, credit cards, whatever I want to buy. DH is in public safety as well- he is full time so he gets paid better than I do- he pays for the mortgage (will be paid off when he retires in 9 years), most of the groceries, the truck payment (I paid for 1/2 of it and the car), and whatever he wants- like his Harley...

My advantage is that, as a professional part timer, I basically make my own schedule. If there is something I want to do, I don't schedule myself to work anywhere during that time. Very nice way to go through life! That said, before I got married, I was working an average of 100+ hours PER WEEK, to pay for everything including health insurance. I still work an average of 30-40 hours per week.

Catalina
Feb. 18, 2010, 01:27 PM
This is a great thread. I always find it interesting to see what people in the horse world do for a living. I am a Study Director at a CRO (contract research organization). We basically do drug development work for all phases - from discovery to market for pharmaceutical/biotech companies. I really like my job and the industry however there are some days I think that I would like to be out and about instead of in an office...

Who do you work for? I do final stage pre-clinical testing on new drugs (test articles) at a CRL owned company. We contract out too.

deltawave
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:08 PM
I would rather make an OK income with low/no job stress than make a high income and have mental bills for therapy.

But this is where horses come in handy--AS therapy. :)

ohhthatgirl
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:20 PM
Full time graphic design student at Auburn University (http://cadc.auburn.edu/graphicdesign/). Graphic design really is one of those fields thats in everything. It's in that magazine you're reading, that road sign you passed, this website you're on... and more! So, basically, as my friend would say, I get to make the world prettier and your life easier. :D

My aspirations include to work for a firm in the NC/VA/MD area. (Not gonna lie, having that many events so close in Area II in insanely appealing!) Maybe something like Design Army (http://www.designarmy.com/), Grafik (http://www.grafik.com/), or Flywheel (http://flywheeldesign.com/).

As for horses, my boy is at home enjoyed the semi-retired lifestyle with my mom. I hope after I graduate, I'll be able to free lease a horse while I scramble money to buy my own in the next few years.

La Chasse
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:36 PM
Back in the Dark Ages, when I was in graduate school, I earned GOOD money as a "pelvic model" for medical students learning to do pelvic exams. Good money for being flat on my back and giving, um, feedback to some of the more ham-handed ones.

The oddest thing that ever happened was when a male medical student from, um, a culture where men and women are kept separated, when confronted with my, well, you know in all its glory, got very lightheaded and had to go sit down in a chair in the hall. I never found out if he actually became able to perform a pelvic exam...


OMG!! LOL. You are awesome! To this day, I thank my lucky stars for the pelvic exam models we "used" at UVA...they were helpful, professional, and knew exactly where each of their internal organs were- amazing feat if I say so myself ;) Unfortunately, the male, ahem, "pelvic part models" were the opposite, totally sketchy & got too much sick enjoyment of out it, (and no, they were not affiliated with UVA). yuck.

Xanthoria
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:39 PM
Senior Web Designer for one of the biggest video games companies around.

I pay my 401k, have a retiree, and own a condo in San Francisco. I'm saving as fast as I can for a new horse but despite being in a pretty high wage bracket I can't see ever affording to compete recognized in the USA - it's too expensive, and I get plenty of kicks hunter pacing, and doing unrecognized events.

Now if I moved back to the UK I would have a wide choice of quality horses available in my price range and a great number of affordable events to go to nearby... gah. I still don't completely understand why horse stuff has to be so expensive over here... :no:

IFG
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:53 PM
Senior Web Designer for one of the biggest video games companies around.

I pay my 401k, have a retiree, and own a condo in San Francisco. I'm saving as fast as I can for a new horse but despite being in a pretty high wage bracket I can't see ever affording to compete recognized in the USA - it's too expensive, and I get plenty of kicks hunter pacing, and doing unrecognized events.

Now if I moved back to the UK I would have a wide choice of quality horses available in my price range and a great number of affordable events to go to nearby... gah. I still don't completely understand why horse stuff has to be so expensive over here... :no:

Trust me, it is CA. It is much more affordable on the East Coast.

inquisitive
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:53 PM
But this is where horses come in handy--AS therapy. :)

:yes::yes::yes::yes::yes:

I'm contemplating a career change, but I think I enjoy the horses and competing as much as I do too much to take a salary cut... my tentative plan is to push through at work for a few more years, then see where my to-be-husband and I are and see if I can take a pay cut/work from home or something. But then there's buying my parents' farm... and maybe having kids... so might have to push through work for a while :lol:

showhorsegallery
Feb. 18, 2010, 02:55 PM
I am a self-employed Web and Graphic designer. I make enough to pay my bills including the bills associated with the one horse. I don't live extravagantly so I can afford the horse.

I got a bank teller job when I graduated from high school. I saved every paycheck until I had enough to pay for the purchase price of the horse. I have supported my horse even since then.

I recently added up how much I've spent to date on the horse and I was, to put it mildly, shocked.

pharmgirl
Feb. 18, 2010, 03:18 PM
I am a PhD scientist that works for the federal government. I was originally pre-vet in college, then decided to go to grad school and get a Masters. I worked for a year after that, and realized that I needed the PhD to really do what I wanted to do as a career, and financially (at least more easily get there).

Since getting my PhD, I do not work in the lab anymore. But, I am still doing science and having a desk job means I can do it from home and have a much more flexible work schedule :). My office is very much about flexible hours and teleworking, so I am able to ride and take lessons during times that other 9-5 office people can't. It also helps that I work with lots of animal people and vets, so they understand when I need to deal with issues with the horse (or the dogs and cat). I think my boss even said at one point that she considers the horse as a dependent and I could use sick leave for him :lol:.

mjrtango93
Feb. 18, 2010, 04:56 PM
Senior Web Designer for one of the biggest video games companies around.

I pay my 401k, have a retiree, and own a condo in San Francisco. I'm saving as fast as I can for a new horse but despite being in a pretty high wage bracket I can't see ever affording to compete recognized in the USA - it's too expensive, and I get plenty of kicks hunter pacing, and doing unrecognized events.

Now if I moved back to the UK I would have a wide choice of quality horses available in my price range and a great number of affordable events to go to nearby... gah. I still don't completely understand why horse stuff has to be so expensive over here... :no:

Do you mind if I ask where you work? I live just across the bridge from you and my husband would kill for a job in that sector! Do you know if they are hiring?

For me I work as a Senior Associate for a 3rd Party Investment Company. Basically just means I am a licensed paper pusher. Pay is decent for what it is, hours are great because I am based off of stock market and on the wrong coast (6am-3pm shift). People are great but hate the job. I have a horrid attention span and get things done too quickly. Always on the lookout for something else, but the job market is pretty depressed here and I wouldn't be able to go somewhere else and make the same kind of $$$ right now and can't afford a cut.

subk
Feb. 18, 2010, 04:57 PM
Isn't anyone else a stay at home mom?

Of course, I could call it "Human Development." Hubby has a great job (development/finance) so in our marital partnership he works 60 hours a week making the money and I run the house, the kids, the farm, the community activism (otherwise know as pissing off politicians) and everything else. Love it.


Full time graphic design student at Auburn University (http://cadc.auburn.edu/graphicdesign/). Graphic design really is one of those fields thats in everything. It's in that magazine you're reading, that road sign you passed, this website you're on... and more! So, basically, as my friend would say, I get to make the world prettier and your life easier. :D\
War Eagle! Is Mrs. Hobbs still teaching intro design? She told our class the first day that we have all had to become visually desensitized, because if we weren't we'd vomit just walking down the street...

deltawave
Feb. 18, 2010, 05:00 PM
I run the house, the kids, the farm, the community activism

I have to do that "in addition to" the day job. :) Although my idea of "community activism" is putting inflammatory bumper stickers on my vehicles. :D :D :D

subk
Feb. 18, 2010, 05:06 PM
I have to do that "in addition to" the day job. :) Although my idea of "community activism" is putting inflammatory bumper stickers on my vehicles. :D :D :D
Yeah? Well my idea is getting the Speaker of the State House, the Governor or even better the First Lady to say nasty things about me in the Sunday paper. One them once called me a "terrorist" and it made the rounds on the talk show circuit, so I dressed up for Halloween in a June Cleaver dress with a bowl of cookie dough and a fake uzi on my back. I really am a sucker for a good costume--although I think that first prize was more because I was bribing everyone with the awesome cookie dough...

kookicat
Feb. 18, 2010, 05:29 PM
I work in sales. It's pretty interesting, pretty stressful and fairly well paid. ;)

quietann
Feb. 18, 2010, 05:34 PM
OMG!! LOL. You are awesome! To this day, I thank my lucky stars for the pelvic exam models we "used" at UVA...they were helpful, professional, and knew exactly where each of their internal organs were- amazing feat if I say so myself ;) Unfortunately, the male, ahem, "pelvic part models" were the opposite, totally sketchy & got too much sick enjoyment of out it, (and no, they were not affiliated with UVA). yuck.

Why thank you :) I liked (not in THAT way) the experience, and knowing I was helping out some future doctors and nurse practitioners. One school where I worked had decided that the med students should learn to do a pelvic on a woman who was known to have gone through it before, and could speak English. Most of the patients at the county hospital where the med students met their first patients did not speak English, and sometimes they showed up as pregnant teens in labor insisting that they had NO idea how they had become pregnant, and not wanting anyone to touch their crotch or even look at it because it was so shameful.

I could see guys getting a thrill out of the whole thing (ewww!), but trust me, from the female side it's just a procedure like any other procedure.

Jane Honda
Feb. 18, 2010, 05:43 PM
I'm a beauty engineer. I call it that because it is so much more than just being a hairdresser/nail tech. I'm also a psychiatrist, a captive audience, an adoring fan, someone that creates temporary confidence, permanent confidence, happiness and a listening ear.

I've been in the business now for 15 years, and absolutely LOVE my job. I'm self employed so I can be the master of my own schedule and have flexibility for my family, and my horse. I currently work 6 days a week because I have a tremendous amount of motivation and a goal.

archieflies
Feb. 18, 2010, 06:09 PM
I've been a secretary, a waitress, taught 8th grade, tutored, been a technical writer, and now I teach rhetoric in a university graduate program. (I have a PhD in BS!) All of the jobs allowed me to have a horse, and now I can actually afford to compete, and my schedule is flexible enough so that I can compete.


Are we the same person? Or at least on the same track in life (though maybe I'm a bit behind)? Never been a waitress, but I've done the secretary thing and I currently teach 8th grade and tutor. It's seriously wearing me down, and I've been searching for tech writing positions, hoping something will pop up in this small town. I have my BA in rhetoric and would kill to go back to at least get a masters in the same. I'd be a professional student if I could.


Teaching pays for my small horse budget and some savings, and hubby pays the rest. Horses are both at home in the cow pasture, and showing is limited, but I do feel lucky. If I wasn't working (maybe soon if the education system doesn't miraculously heal itself overnight!) I could probably still keep one horse at home and pleasure ride, but that's about it. Land is cheap here, so that's good.

Hubby's pretty good job is a blessing and a curse. It allows me to spend my paycheck on the horses, but it also means we'll probably never move out of this small town. And so my work opportunities are pretty dull.

Ruth0552
Feb. 18, 2010, 06:11 PM
I'm a high school math teacher. I used to be a vet tech, and before that I worked in an office WAY too far away. I really like my job, but I am going to have to get a masters degree at some point. Not really sure how I'm going to pay for that either.

I have 3 horses that live at home. My job pays my half of expenses and my horse bills, but it doesn't pay for past debt :( I've recently started tutoring in an effort to pay that off. If I was lucky enough to have a hubby that paid the household bills I could pay them off faster. Hubby makes more than I do, but not enough to support both of us.

In 5 years, my cc debt and car loan will all be paid off. I also work in a title 1 school district so I should get some loan forgiveness from the feds. I am hoping that shortly after that we will be able to buy our own home, but who knows. Not really sure where the masters fits into that though...

cgray0983
Feb. 18, 2010, 07:51 PM
Do you mind if I ask where you work? I live just across the bridge from you and my husband would kill for a job in that sector! Do you know if they are hiring?



Not Xanth, but a fellow Bay Area person who is on the look out for a new position.

There are a lot of jobs around, you just have to look. I know Facebook is hiring a lot of positions right now (you have to go the FB and find their job postings there). I know of a Mobile Advertising company hiring now too. I don't know about the Video game industry - check out EA and Ubisoft's websites...? Just dig dig dig :)

I am constantly looking for something that may bump up my income so I can afford a young project instead of just supporting a lame jumper :/

deltawave
Feb. 18, 2010, 08:11 PM
Oooh, another horse game! :D

Xanthoria
Feb. 18, 2010, 08:24 PM
I work for SEGA. Hiring a Sr Flash Dev and a programmer right now, among other things. I hear Zynga is hiring too - long hours though (startup)

CookiePony
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:14 PM
I'm a history professor at a small, private research university. With my salary plus my OH's paycheck I board and compete one horse and have a small house. I do appreciate the flexible hours, though the work is *never* done! I am on the tenure track and it's publish or perish.

RunForIt
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:34 PM
Yeah? Well my idea is getting the Speaker of the State House, the Governor or even better the First Lady to say nasty things about me in the Sunday paper. One them once called me a "terrorist" and it made the rounds on the talk show circuit, so I dressed up for Halloween in a June Cleaver dress with a bowl of cookie dough and a fake uzi on my back. I really am a sucker for a good costume--although I think that first prize was more because I was bribing everyone with the awesome cookie dough...

I LOVE IT!!!! You, Lynn, and I would/will have SOOO much fun together...am proud to know you are out there doing your civic duty - WHILE raising your kids right! :cool: You will be happy to know that having survived a broken neck, I have decided I am brave enough to drive up I-75 North to Franklin! Lellie has assured me that Rasta will be ready to go ANYWHERE I choose...get a paddock and bed ready come October! :lol: :cool:

sprite
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:37 PM
I'm a pig farmer :)

Well- technically, a genetic research technician- but I raise hogs for a small swine genetic research company. Mainly I run the farrowing units; its an interesting job that pays decently; my horse habit these days consists of 1 semi retired TB mare and I don't compete at the moment, so it does cover my horsey costs! Although with the recent addition of out daughter, I am...sort of...pony shopping... :)

redlight
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:42 PM
I had a small boarding and training business at my farm that paid the bills on two horses one of whom I competed. Had to sell farm to move closer to hubby's business. Then had major health issue so bye, bye horses. Got over health problems and hated being away from the horses. I didn't have the income to support having a horse so I started my own business designing and selling my own line of tack on the internet. I am small and still new but I absolutely love it as it was something I had been thinking of doing for a long time. I don't have a horse yet but hope to within the next one to two years. Right now I live vicariously through others!

Oh and I have kids and a house to manage as well. I think Domestic Diva would be an appropriate job title! It is really neat to read about all the interesting jobs everyone has.

To the person at Auburn, War Eagle! My husband graduated from there and is a huge Tigers fan.

Mukluk
Feb. 18, 2010, 11:41 PM
Psychologist at the local prison. Thinking of going into private practice eventually and perhaps even doing sport psychology with the equestrian set!

cgray0983
Feb. 19, 2010, 12:02 AM
Oooh, another horse game! :D

I do some of the graphics for it horse images and header :-) Another supportive measure for my horse habit.

IrishRydr
Feb. 19, 2010, 12:14 AM
I was a clinical social worker after my first go-around in college/graduate school. That was no where near enough money to fully support my horse habit. Thanks to the generous support of my parents, I'm back in graduate school again. The ONLY reason I am putting myself through this is to (1) support my horse and (2) allow me to have enough income and flexibility of schedule to actually enjoy him.

Tobias
Feb. 19, 2010, 12:23 AM
I primarily am a homemaker, I still live at home and help my mom with house work. None of that pays money, but pays experience. On my free time I make tack for breyer horses, that supports my horses board, I also help teach math and science classes with my pastor and his family, That pays for my horses shoes! lol. I also work horses at my barn to help pay board and while I am there I teach some friends about horses.(parts of the body, grooming, care, tack cleaning, etc.) and that pays for my Starbucks! :lol:

redhorse5
Feb. 19, 2010, 12:27 AM
I've spent my life in the piano business. I'm a concert tech and rebuilder who has been a dealer, manufacturing consultant, and head of sales in the US and Canada for a German company. I'm now retired and living on my horse farm and I come out of retirement for consulting jobs in the technical, sales and marketing sides of the business.

I have a rebuilding shop on my farm and manufacturers send instruments to me for analysis. I work on them for sometimes months, write reports and operational procedures and send them back.

One of the most interesting things about my job is that I've met and worked for many of the top pianists in the world and I still train techs for dealers and manufacturers. I go to a lot of piano factories all over the world but the travel is really tiresome.

I’ve been lucky in that I almost never get bored and I’ve met some really interesting kind people.

LISailing
Feb. 19, 2010, 09:10 AM
I'm amazed at how everyone seems to have supported their horse habit. Both my husband and myself are engineers. I love my job finally. I work as a system planning engineer for a gas distribution company. I only have money and time for one horse, but have dreams of owning my own small farm. This dream is a long shot, since we are finishing up putting our two boys through private school and college tuition is fast approaching, ugh! Our family conflict is that the men are avid sailors and love racing. Our basement is full of sails and I have a small corner in the garage for horse stuff that's not out at the barn or stored in the horse trailer. Very unfair, but I don't have to cook dinner since I don't get home from work and the barn till 8PM.

mjrtango93
Feb. 19, 2010, 09:45 AM
I work for SEGA. Hiring a Sr Flash Dev and a programmer right now, among other things. I hear Zynga is hiring too - long hours though (startup)

I am pretty sure my brother in law works for Zynga. They are the ones that make the game applications for Facebook right? He loves it there, but is a totally different area then my hubby and hasn't been there long enough to be comfortable recommending people in quite yet.

IrishRydr
Feb. 19, 2010, 11:27 AM
I don't know how to quote myself, but posted in my previous thread that my previous job as a clinical social worker didn't pay the bills, so am back in school to try to improve this time. I noticed that everyone in this thread, whether making money or not, was reporting that they were happy in their professional life. While only a student, I can't say that. I would like to hear from the medical people. Does this get better, or are you always 'under the gun', so to speak? I know that patients count on us for their lives, so this is very important. I enjoy working with patients, and my feedback is positive with my latest midterm clinical eval, especially in the areas of therapeutic communication, relating pharm, lab values, and patho to the disease process - so I guess I'm doing a good job. But the stress and the amout of time involved is killing me. Is the profession better than school? I really hope so.

deltawave
Feb. 19, 2010, 12:19 PM
I would like to hear from the medical people. Does this get better, or are you always 'under the gun', so to speak? I know that patients count on us for their lives, so this is very important. I enjoy working with patients, and my feedback is positive with my latest midterm clinical eval, especially in the areas of therapeutic communication, relating pharm, lab values, and patho to the disease process - so I guess I'm doing a good job. But the stress and the amout of time involved is killing me. Is the profession better than school? I really hope so.

I can only speak for myself. Medical school was pretty bad, but I loved residency and fellowship, other than the periods of sleep deprivation. A lot of people handle that well, I don't. :)

Yes, you are always "under the gun" to some extent in medicine, and if you sit back and think "oh my God, what I'm doing could KILL somebody" you could potentially be paralyzed by the potential stress, etc. It all really, really depends on how you handle that type of thing. As a former social worker you'd know that as well as anyone. :) But on the other hand, being the one responsible, not having to check your decisions with someone else, having the freedom to practice your art, apply the science, and feel like--often KNOW--you are helping is incredibly, incredibly gratifying. The time spent is just . . . what it is. You make your own time. I take days off for my mental health, and take the pay cut that goes with it. I'm OK with it, and I know that the people who live with me like it better. :lol: Sometimes I work 25 days in a row, but I know it's coming, I brace myself for it, and I enjoy the parts I can. Then I get a little break and catch up on barn chores. :D

I'm a very firm believer that we wear our temperaments closer than our skin, and that nothing we choose to do, nowhere we choose to go, changes how we behave, how we act/react to thing, and who we are. If you're basically an optimist who enjoys the process AND anticipates the destination, even a long crappy period can be tolerated. :D If you go into a very difficult field or endeavor with a poor outlook, a temperament that is never satisfied, or boundless pessimism . . . you will find the same person on the other side as well.

IrishRydr
Feb. 19, 2010, 01:01 PM
Thanks, Delta. Now back to studying for Tuedsay's big exam. :yes:

La Chasse
Feb. 19, 2010, 04:47 PM
Does this get better, or are you always 'under the gun', so to speak? Is the profession better than school? I really hope so.

School stinks. For me, there was a lot of anxiety about "not getting it" and therefore, "killing someone" and not to mention, the amount of info was insane. It is a lot easier after school but there are other sources of stress, at least for me: I just left a position where I was "under the gun," and miserably burnt out. So much of medicine, IMHO, depends on your area, your colleagues and work environment. Deltawave does cardiology, which makes me throw PVC's just thinking about it... :eek:

KateWooten
Feb. 19, 2010, 08:26 PM
I'm in-between careers at the moment, and have been for the last ten years or so. I retired from software development in 2000 and went off round the world free-flying, and never really went back to work. Fortunately just as the money ran out, I met OH, and he's a hot young attorney* so life is good. We're lucky that I managed to buy, renovate and sell a couple of houses in the UK at the right time, and with the difference in land prices between there and here, we don't have loans to repay on the farm. And we're really cheap. So that probably supports a lot of my excess pony buying habit. That, and the fact that I refuse point-blank to grow up and admit that at 42 I should be out of ponies by now :D

*which I guess also puts me in the category of earning a part-time living from undressing, no ?


ETA : I completely forgot - I'm on a 6-month saddle-fitting apprenticeship so will hopefully be a qualified independent saddle fitter by the summer !

tuppysmom
Feb. 19, 2010, 11:43 PM
I am a Family Facilitator or Family/Friend Easy Button

tx3dayeventer
Feb. 20, 2010, 12:00 AM
I am a senior accountant for a region of 5 hospitals in Central Texas. I do mostly GL accounting and some AP work (our AP lady is only part-time). I like what I do but I HATE HATE HATE my gremlin of a boss!!!! I threaten to quit everyday (under my breath of course). I am happy to have a job in this economy but am applying to law school to start next fall (fall of 2011). I have my sights set on one particular law school in my state that is awesome at agricultural law. My main goal will be to practice water/wind rights up in the panhandle of TX (or by Abilene). I really want to be an advocate for the farmers/ranchers with the encroachment of urban areas and the misuse of eminent domain along with the importance that water rights are going to play in the next 15 to 20 years as we start getting low on natural water supply and agriculture has to take a back seat to urban dwellings. I would LOVE to be a lobbyist for the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Assoc or Texas Feed Cattle Assoc (or something of the ilk). I have a BS in Agribusiness and an MBA with an emphasis in Agribusiness (my electives were agbiz classes).

I ride when I can but the job I am currently in has me so depressed that I find it hard to even go out and see my mare. Lucky for me she lives at my parents ranch with about 10 other horses and so she has daily human interaction and lots of horsey friends (plus no board, just feed costs :D) . I was showing her in the AQHA jumpers and would love to go to a BN/N event this summer. I started yoga/pilates this week (there is a studio by the hospital) and I am hoping that helps me get centered and find some peace so I can enjoy my mare again.

I struggle with quitting and taking on a different job to last me about a year or year and a half until I have to move to go to law school. I am not sure if it isnt just worth it to put my head down and keep the job I have or find something else.


Anyways.... there are so many cool jobs that people have out on our board!!! I am seriously impressed!!!!!

Pferd51
Feb. 21, 2010, 06:56 PM
I have a PhD in biochemistry. I worked for most of my career in research, both industry and academia. At the moment I work for a CRO developing and validating various types of bioassays. I had hoped when I took the position that my schedule would accomodate more riding, but it has actually been worse. Our group has had a packed list of projects for quite some time, which is good from the job security standpoint and not so good from the time and energy to ride standpoint.
None of my jobs have come close to covering our family's horse expenses. My wife also rides, as did my daughter before she went off to college. It is only with the benefit of some supplementation from generous family that we have been able to do it all these years.