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View Full Version : What to do in too deep footing? (incl. snow)



fatorangehorse
Feb. 14, 2010, 06:36 PM
I've seen quite a few posts (here and on Dressage threads) re: folks complaining about footing issues - either snow or less than ideal indoors - I am in this boat too. There have to be some things we can do @ the walk that will keep your horses in action and safe from injury until we can trailer out or weather improves.

Any good ideas PLEASE?!?!?!?:cry:

riderboy
Feb. 14, 2010, 07:02 PM
I'm not a huge expert on footing but this is what I know. Our vet at Rood and Riddle, sport horse expert and eventer himself tells us the most common mistake people make with their arena footing is making it too deep. What to do about that? Unless you're willing to risk your horse, don't ride if thatseems to be the case. I don't know about snow, it's a different, more compressible footing than sand. It's also more slick and hides holes.

Flipper
Feb. 14, 2010, 07:48 PM
How do you know when your sand arena footing is 'too deep'?

Jeannette, formerly ponygyrl
Feb. 14, 2010, 10:28 PM
The thing I keep in mind is hard footing challenges bone. Soft footing challenges tendons and ligaments. Neither is inherently "bad" but you don't want to over challenge any tissue.
So in deep footing work, but work shorter, and slower...

fatorangehorse
Feb. 14, 2010, 10:51 PM
The barn I'm at just re-did their ring. It's a disaster. I swear it's beach sand. can I even walk in it? Or is that too risky? I don't think they're going to fix it. They have some western riders who prefer it god knows why. They have good outdoor footing and many other v. good qualities - so I don't really want to move. I can trailer out on weekends.

Can't I find something useful to do during the week in this crap until the frozen tundra is gone???:eek:

Bobthehorse
Feb. 15, 2010, 12:42 AM
Snow isnt the same as deep footing/sand. Its more like working in water than anything. It is generally quite firm once the foot is bearing weight, and when its not it provides light resistance and encourages reach. I actually love working in snow, if you treat it somewhat like water work.

Deep sand, if it was at all manageable (sometimes it isnt) Id just make sure to go slow and not work as hard or long. But if you cant walk in it, I wouldnt ride in it.