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RnR
Feb. 12, 2010, 07:37 PM
I am in Physics II this semester, and as a lab project, we have to make a 15 minute presentation on something physics related. Of course, kids are doing the typical roller-coaster, or MRI themed presentations, but I really wanted to relate mine to what I love.

I have seen many great discussions on here, but can't seem to find them (particularly by some of you physics genius's). I have to make a project proposal by Monday, and I am having a really hard time trying to figure out how to do this.

I don't have to perform an experiment or anything, but I have to relate what I want to talk about to Physics, and say how it is relevant in the world today. Therefore, I wanted to do rotational falls, and the pros/cons of frangible pins. Basically, discuss how this is a major issue in the sport I love, and how important physics are in trying to solve this.

Any help? Sites I can go to? I think I remember Reed (?) having a great study about all of the physics of this research.

Thanks for the help, feel free to have a discussion about any of this also. It will only give me more ideas, and help me expand on my project (Lord knows 15 minutes in front of a crowd is going to drrrraaaggg by for me).

Thanks!

bornfreenowexpensive
Feb. 12, 2010, 08:31 PM
Do a search for some of the threads on them. Here is one of the threads

http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=149807

Honestly...15 minutes really isn't very long for a presentation. Good luck!

JER
Feb. 12, 2010, 08:40 PM
The New York Times did a lovely presentation of the physics of aerials skiing (http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/sports/olympics/olympics-interactives.html#tab1) last week. You might find it useful as a template of a good presentation.

retreadeventer
Feb. 13, 2010, 08:30 PM
Duh...yes. Frangible pins. The USEA magazine had a very good article on that last year or the year before. It should be available on the USEA website. Look at the download page, and look under cross country guidelines, there should be a frangible pin pdf somewhere on the site.
Tremaine Cooper and any other USEA course designer that has a website might have something on their websites on frangible pins. Try Eric Bull's site for the cross country jump building. Frangible pins came from England, search there at the British Eventing Association (?) A personal source is always best. Do you know a recognized course designer?

Janet
Feb. 13, 2010, 11:20 PM
At the USEA annual meeting, there was a presentation of the work being done at University of Kentucky.

You might see if you can get a copy of the presentation.

ksbadger
Feb. 13, 2010, 11:49 PM
University of Bristol has a continuing study on the loads on fences & the physics of falls. One link is here:
http://www.britisheventing.com/section.asp?section=694&sectionTitle=BE+Safety+Research+Fence

They have teamed with the University of Kentucky on "frangible" fences & there was a presentation made at this year's USEA Annual Meeting.

RnR
Feb. 14, 2010, 12:07 AM
Those are great suggestions guys! Thanks so much.

Whom do you think I would contact to get a hold of some of the University of Kentucky research? Is there a specific person or department?

I don't know any recognized course designers, but the thought did cross my mind. Even if it wasn't for a project, I think it would be very interesting to hear from them, and all of the thought/physics that go into designing a course.

retreadeventer
Feb. 14, 2010, 10:57 AM
RnR, just call one.
If you look at the USEA site, they have a news clip up there about the newly formed committees for 2010. There's a committee for course design or designers, and their phone numbers and contact info should be listed. I don't know ANYBODY in eventing that isn't willing to talk extensively about courses and course design! (If you are polite, explain what you need, and call at a good time.) Best of luck and would you please let us know how you proceed, and how things came out! Thanks.
:)

RAyers
Feb. 14, 2010, 12:10 PM
Those are great suggestions guys! Thanks so much.

Whom do you think I would contact to get a hold of some of the University of Kentucky research? Is there a specific person or department?

I don't know any recognized course designers, but the thought did cross my mind. Even if it wasn't for a project, I think it would be very interesting to hear from them, and all of the thought/physics that go into designing a course.



The program is not fully formed as the funding is still being solidified (professors won't start work unless there is already money in the accounts to pay the students). The program is in Mechanical Engineering.

As ksbadger said, the program that is really up and running is at Bristol in the UK. BE funds this directly. They made the fully instrumented competition fence to measure forces in falls and hits. This data is going to the frangible pin work.

RunForIt
Feb. 14, 2010, 01:32 PM
The program is not fully formed as the funding is still being solidified (professors won't start work unless there is already money in the accounts to pay the students). The program is in Mechanical Engineering.

As ksbadger said, the program that is really up and running is at Bristol in the UK. BE funds this directly. They made the fully instrumented competition fence to measure forces in falls and hits. This data is going to the frangible pin work.

Will data from the Bristol/BE funded program likely be shared with international eventing and other similar projects?

ksbadger
Feb. 15, 2010, 12:40 AM
RunForIt,
My guess is that it will be eventually. The original Bristol study was also sent to the FEI (they do actually care) so USEF & thus USEA would have access. I also beleive there's reciprocal data sharing between Bristol, Kentucky and other researchers in, if memory serves from the USEA presentation, Sweden & Germany. Reed works within the scientific community so I'd bow to his superior knowledge if I'm wrong.

RAyers
Feb. 15, 2010, 11:13 AM
If you REALLY REALLY wanted to get into it, physics is involved at even the smallest level. Think of the Brownian motion (see Einstein's treaties on this subject) within and between the cells to maintain physiologic function, diffusion (Fick's Laws) for neural function and nutrient flow to cells. How about the conformal change in proteins in response to interactions with surrounding metabolites, ions or other molecules? They are all governed by the laws of physics. Admittedly these are more along the line of Physics III (quantum physics) or specialized sets of Phys. II (diffusion along a concentration gradient).

Reed