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View Full Version : F-150 and Bumper Pulls, also, I have a question



KingstonHill
Feb. 7, 2010, 01:47 PM
So I go to my local trailer shop to get my weight distribution hitch put on my trailer and they told me I didnt have enough truck!!!! I have the 5.7L, 4x4, crewcab, 2009 with towing package F-150 and my horse trailer is a alluminum (shadow) 2 horse, straight load bp, w small dressing room (weights around 2,500lbs) I only haul ponies usually around 800-900 each and mainly one at a time. I got the reese weight distribution hitch (used) for a great price..Now do you guys think I have a big enough truck? also...my new hitch is great but I went to take the bars off of it and one of clips were the bars goes in is loose now, like isn't tight against the metal(I may have to take a pic to explain.) Its kind of like its spring loaded and the other one is so tight is just closes tighter. But when I put the bar in, its not lose enough for the bar to come out. Does that make sense? Should I take it to the trailer place to have it looked at? Thanks in advance!

contesstant
Feb. 7, 2010, 02:12 PM
I tow a 2H BP extra tall Sundowner with a dressing room, with a 5.7L F-150 with a weight distributing hitch just fine. The only time it might be an issue is pulling up and down steep hills or mountains. We just towed the trailer loaded with 3000 lb. of household goods from VA to CA with not ONE issue. Now a live load is different, but also won't equal 3000 lb. Is it my IDEAL tow vehicle? No. But it is more than adequate. Especially with the weight-distributing hitch (which I won't tow without.) If you don't tow a lot and don't tow up and down lots of big hills or mountains, you should be fine. I'm assuming you bought the truck with the tow package which includes heavier-duty brakes and such?

pintopiaffe
Feb. 7, 2010, 03:45 PM
Most folks here will tell you the same thing.

I, OTOH, hauled my 1969 Stidham (no brakes, didn't have 'em back then) and then my S&S Custom Stock Combo (#2025 shipped weight) with my Dodge Dakota and with my 1996 big 6, F150 no problem.

The WD hitch did make a small difference handling, more for the Dakota.

I will put my kevlar flame suit on, and say that as long as the Tranny (HD cooler) and engine can do the job, and the electric brakes work, you are fine.

I live on a mountain, 850+ feet up. I have to go up or down it to get anywhere. Then, once I hit the highway, I have to climb a fairly significant ring of mountains to get out of my metro area.

I always figure if I MAKE it to Newport with no issues, the rest of the trip will be cake. :lol:

You can go a lot faster highway speeds with Big Trucks. But GOD FORBID you have to stop. Everyone talks about Big Trucks having more stopping power... I disagree. If you're going that fast, sure, the truck *will* stop the trailer, but you're going to have some damaged horses too. If you slow down to begin with, things end up better. I cringe when the Big Trucks with trailers go cruising by me at 75 or more.

And then people wonder why their horses don't load. :uhoh:

I simply don't haul above 55mph with horses. 60 if I'm coasting down the mountains. I slow down A LOT , and very early for hazards. I pay super attention.

I put 110k on the Dakota's first tranny, another 120k on the second, and I hauled 1600 +/- lbs of hay weekly, and USED 4WD a lot--can't really blame the trailer which I only use 7-10x a year. The Ford I've admittedly only put 80K on.

I currently have a bigger truck, a GMC 2500HD. I find little difference in towing the same S&S (except for driver comfort! :p) mileage is the same as the Ford F150. The biggest thing? Several times I've found myself going TOO FAST for conditions with the trailer becaus it's easier. I DO see that as a bad thing. I still have the Ford, and if I'm only hauling one horse, odds are I will use it, mileage is that much better.

I grew up in a time where we hauled all sorts of steel trailers with mostly 150's and 1500s. I've made several X-Country trips with v6 vehicles. I honestly, dont' think Big Trucks are all they are claimed to be.

And I know I'll get vehement opposition. ;)

monstrpony
Feb. 7, 2010, 04:06 PM
I would check the rating on your particular, individual truck. I know that the new F-150s can be set up to tow up to 9,000 lbs, but that does not mean that your particular truck is set up this way. It depends on engine, transmission, the weight of your truck's body style, plus a few extras that may or may not be on your particular truck. So it is possible that your truck is okay, but none of us can tell you for sure.

KingstonHill
Feb. 7, 2010, 06:40 PM
How do I check the towing capacity, I am pretty sure it is 8,500 according to the FORD book...but Im not positive

2bee
Feb. 7, 2010, 06:58 PM
I would check the rating on your particular, individual truck. I know that the new F-150s can be set up to tow up to 9,000 lbs, but that does not mean that your particular truck is set up this way. It depends on engine, transmission, the weight of your truck's body style, plus a few extras that may or may not be on your particular truck. So it is possible that your truck is okay, but none of us can tell you for sure.

I can.

That pickup will be fine. Ford did not make a F150 rated at less than 5000# in 2009. (https://www.fleet.ford.com/showroom/rv_trailer_towing/2009/F150ConvFifthTow.pdf)

2bee
Feb. 7, 2010, 07:03 PM
How do I check the towing capacity, I am pretty sure it is 8,500 according to the FORD book...but Im not positive

Click the "2009" link in the above post, need your wheelbase, engine size, and rear axle ratio. That will tell you what you're rated for.

As for your WDH, IF I understand the style of WDH you have, and IF I understand which clip your talking about, and IF I understand your complaint about it.......thats a lot if IF's......then you need someone capable to look at it. What you are describing could become a problem.

dressagetraks
Feb. 7, 2010, 07:27 PM
Coleridge the Wonder Truck (380,000, original engine) is an F150 and has done just fine for years hauling a steel 2h bumper pull, including loaded with 2 full size horses. I do have a weight distribution hitch. I replaced the transmission at 333,000. ;) That is the ONLY major repair.

Got called to brother's rescue yesterday. I was out doing chores when the dog went off and started barking, and here came brother WALKING into the driveway. He was several miles down the road and had had a nice unplanned morning walk in the cold. Hit black ice on a hill and completely lost it, buried little car about 25 feet off the road, nose down, nearly into a culvert. So he walked to my place for help.

Coleridge and I were game to try with no promises given. Awful location, and I had a bad feeling the minute I saw it. Very steep slope and drop off from road, sneet-slick footing, ground so soft you sank in several inches just people walking. Car WAY over there. I backed Coleridge down that slope catercornered to match car, until I had 3 of 4 tires off. The tow rope just BARELY reached at that point. Truck, bless him, would not pull it back out up the slick and steep and soft slope. That's probably the first thing in 12 years that I have asked of that truck where he refused, although he did try. Can't blame him. Awful spot. I called this game off and told my brother to call a tow truck, and with the car unhitched, Coleridge did promptly pull himself back up out of the ditch and onto the road, starting from 3 tires off, deep mud, sneet, steep downslope.

You won't break any speed records, but you didn't need to anyway. LOVE my F150. :yes: Will keep him forever and replace all parts as needed. Might get a bigger truck someday, but this one will never lose his usefulness, and I wouldn't hesitate to pull a bumper pull with him.

pintopiaffe
Feb. 7, 2010, 07:34 PM
Thank you DT. I was once again (while listening to CarTalk) contemplating the wisdom of putting the power steering pump, tires & gas tank onto Tess the Truck, or trading her for a car.

She's only got 120k on her. That's a BABY ford. ;)

SonnyandLacy
Feb. 7, 2010, 08:11 PM
That makes me giggle.
I pull one horse (maybe 1000lbs) in my cotner with my ford ranger. It came prehitched from the dealer, all I had to do was wire it for my electric brakes.

paintlady
Feb. 7, 2010, 08:31 PM
I pull a 2-horse Hawk trailer with dressing room with my Chevy Silverado 1500 Z-71. Our truck has the factory installed to package and the larger Vortec 5300 V8 4-speed automatic engine w/4WD. The Z71 also includes the off-road suspension system. I haven't hand any problems hauling 2 horses. I do use a weight distribution hitch at all times though - even when just hauling one horse.

weasel1088
Feb. 7, 2010, 08:34 PM
Most folks here will tell you the same thing.

I, OTOH, hauled my 1969 Stidham (no brakes, didn't have 'em back then) and then my S&S Custom Stock Combo (#2025 shipped weight) with my Dodge Dakota and with my 1996 big 6, F150 no problem.

The WD hitch did make a small difference handling, more for the Dakota.

I will put my kevlar flame suit on, and say that as long as the Tranny (HD cooler) and engine can do the job, and the electric brakes work, you are fine.

I live on a mountain, 850+ feet up. I have to go up or down it to get anywhere. Then, once I hit the highway, I have to climb a fairly significant ring of mountains to get out of my metro area.

I always figure if I MAKE it to Newport with no issues, the rest of the trip will be cake. :lol:

You can go a lot faster highway speeds with Big Trucks. But GOD FORBID you have to stop. Everyone talks about Big Trucks having more stopping power... I disagree. If you're going that fast, sure, the truck *will* stop the trailer, but you're going to have some damaged horses too. If you slow down to begin with, things end up better. I cringe when the Big Trucks with trailers go cruising by me at 75 or more.

And then people wonder why their horses don't load. :uhoh:

I simply don't haul above 55mph with horses. 60 if I'm coasting down the mountains. I slow down A LOT , and very early for hazards. I pay super attention.

I put 110k on the Dakota's first tranny, another 120k on the second, and I hauled 1600 +/- lbs of hay weekly, and USED 4WD a lot--can't really blame the trailer which I only use 7-10x a year. The Ford I've admittedly only put 80K on.

I currently have a bigger truck, a GMC 2500HD. I find little difference in towing the same S&S (except for driver comfort! :p) mileage is the same as the Ford F150. The biggest thing? Several times I've found myself going TOO FAST for conditions with the trailer becaus it's easier. I DO see that as a bad thing. I still have the Ford, and if I'm only hauling one horse, odds are I will use it, mileage is that much better.

I grew up in a time where we hauled all sorts of steel trailers with mostly 150's and 1500s. I've made several X-Country trips with v6 vehicles. I honestly, dont' think Big Trucks are all they are claimed to be.

And I know I'll get vehement opposition. ;)




you really get better mileage with the ford?? i believe you, im just surprised. i assume the chevy is a diesel? what kind of mileage with each do you get??

KingstonHill
Feb. 7, 2010, 08:55 PM
Can anyone post some pics of there weight distribution hitch? Now at the dealer they said I couldnt have sway bars and a WD hitch? Does that sounds right? I got the Reese Straightline WD Hitch

pintopiaffe
Feb. 7, 2010, 09:00 PM
I get better mileage with ONE horse in the trailer with the Ford, about 11-12mpg highway. 19-21 empty. (it's a standard, too)

With the GMC (gasoline :sigh: :no: ) I get 7-10 tops with trailer, with trailer with 1 horse, with trailer with 2 horses, with trailer, 2 horses, tack, hay etc. etc. etc. And a whopping 13 with no trailer. :dead:

It's not *that* MUCH I suppose but slightly, and when the routine lesson trip is 450 miles, it does add up. Also depends on whether I'm unhitching and travelling further (which I often do--leave horses overnight, go see parents, come back next day for another lesson, etc.)

It's probably in my mind though. The Ford has this foolish 15 gallon gas tank. Which means stopping a lot, but less $$ to fill. The GMC has a 30 gallon tank. Which I've only ever FILLED 2x since I"ve owned it. :lol:

weasel1088
Feb. 7, 2010, 09:20 PM
I get better mileage with ONE horse in the trailer with the Ford, about 11-12mpg highway. 19-21 empty. (it's a standard, too)

With the GMC (gasoline :sigh: :no: ) I get 7-10 tops with trailer, with trailer with 1 horse, with trailer with 2 horses, with trailer, 2 horses, tack, hay etc. etc. etc. And a whopping 13 with no trailer. :dead:

It's not *that* MUCH I suppose but slightly, and when the routine lesson trip is 450 miles, it does add up. Also depends on whether I'm unhitching and travelling further (which I often do--leave horses overnight, go see parents, come back next day for another lesson, etc.)

It's probably in my mind though. The Ford has this foolish 15 gallon gas tank. Which means stopping a lot, but less $$ to fill. The GMC has a 30 gallon tank. Which I've only ever FILLED 2x since I"ve owned it. :lol:



Ok i gotcha, makes much more sense now. it would make sense that the 2500HD gets less mpg than the smaller 1/2 ton ford. thats pretty good mileage with the ford, i havent been paying attention much to ford since i got rid of my mustang and picked up my dodge pickup. and i do like the 35 gallon tank my truck has! though when diesel was $5 a gallon out here in CA it was a nightmare


and to the OP, your fine with the trailer. and i would have someone look at the issue with the hitch you described, it is just too tough over the internet. better safe than sorry!

Puddin Pie
Feb. 7, 2010, 11:12 PM
You probably have what my trailer guys call tortion bars (not sure if I spelled that right). The "sway" bar as I understanding, is a separate option, in addition to the tortion bars. The said T bars help the hitch distribute the weight of the tow vehicle forwards on the truck. At least this is how I remembered it being explained to me. Tom King would be a could one to chime in on this.

svpmc
Feb. 8, 2010, 12:08 AM
We have a F-250 power stroke 6-speed that we use to haul a bumper pull two horse. Needless to say, it is more truck than is required, but there are many times we have been glad to have the extra power. Due to this we have not had to put stabilizers/equalizers/sway bars on (per mech. rec.). We routinely haul 8+ hours on highways w/ semis and high winds and had no problems with swaying. I have been in a truck pulling loaded four-horse goose neck over a pass and been worried about making it to the top. If its an option, always opt for more power than less, you will be glad to have it someday and have fewer problems. As a footnote: I prefer manual transmissions in case the brakes fail

2bee
Feb. 8, 2010, 08:12 AM
Can anyone post some pics of there weight distribution hitch? Now at the dealer they said I couldnt have sway bars and a WD hitch? Does that sounds right? I got the Reese Straightline WD Hitch

The Reese Strait-Line Hitch already has sway control built in. Take a look around etrailer's faq page. (http://www.etrailer.com/faq-weightdistribution.aspx)

Weight distribution and sway control are two seperate items. In the better WDH they are combined, the Equal-i-zer and the Reese Strait-line/Dual cam series are very popular examples of an 'all in one' type of hitch. You will be pleased with your hitch's performance.

MSP
Feb. 9, 2010, 03:56 PM
How do I check the towing capacity, I am pretty sure it is 8,500 according to the FORD book...but Im not positive

Try the driver side door, around the hinges.

The rear end makes a big difference in tow capacity. I was looking at a local dealers selection of F150s and out of all he had on the lot only one was configured the way I would consider to be a good towing truck (max tow capacity).

TrotTrotPumpkn
Feb. 11, 2010, 04:17 PM
Try the driver side door, around the hinges.

The rear end makes a big difference in tow capacity. I was looking at a local dealers selection of F150s and out of all he had on the lot only one was configured the way I would consider to be a good towing truck (max tow capacity).

I'm guessing you saw a lot of short boxes?

I think that's all our local dealer orders on the F-150's (although lots of super crew cabs or whatever the 4 door option is called).