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View Full Version : N'east horse-friendly privacy fast growing hedge/bush/etc?



pintopiaffe
Feb. 5, 2010, 11:10 PM
I know, I know, ask the local Extension.

But it's Friday night. You're here, and they are NOT. :lol:

Any favorites?

Looking to block the view, mostly, more than anything.

Ajierene
Feb. 5, 2010, 11:18 PM
No actual specific advice other than to talk to some real experts about 'fast growing'.

I had a fast growing tree in my front yard. Apparently the previous owner was warned that this type of tree was fast growing with a more horizontal roots, which meant they grew into my sewer drain and I had some problems.

Other fast growing trees and bushes will grow more vertical roots. This helps with longevity and not getting into things they should not be getting into.

gloriginger
Feb. 5, 2010, 11:25 PM
bamboo is very fast growing and it grows tall and spreads...

Quin
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:05 AM
bamboo is very fast growing and it grows tall and spreads...


......but not so much in northern New England where PP lives.

Larksmom
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:17 AM
how about Black, blue or rasberry bushes? Have you got new fruitbat neighbors?:eek:
I 'been missin the smilies!

suz
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:18 AM
wait--i'm in vermont and have invasive bamboo. it grows crazy tall-say, ten feet high! and spreads like wildfire.
the only way to get rid of it seems to be goats--they like the young shoots.
my bamboo used to attract tiny wasps when in bloom, though give the goats access to it and there will be no blooms. ever!

AppJumpr08
Feb. 6, 2010, 01:01 AM
Jerusalem Artichokes "Sunchokes" (http://www.fedcoseeds.com/moose.htm) for a quick fix this summer.
I know the tubers are edible, but am not sure if the leaves are poisonous? They grow quite tall very quickly, and have pretty yellow flowers.

I had a big bamboo patch at the farm in NH... I'm sure it would grow up he'ah.

I bet Fedco might have some suggestions... 207-873-7333. Probably not open right now, but maybe tomorrow?

gloriginger
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:13 AM
......but not so much in northern New England where PP lives.

I live in Northern NE and we have bamboo. :)

Bluey
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:22 AM
Here, a friend planted "austrees" on a line to eventually protect his roping arena from the SW winds.
In five years they were TEN times larger, now a good 40-50 foot tall and definitely a great visual and wind barrier.
He said they grow as well as you may water them.
He watered them A LOT.:eek:

See if those may thive where you are.

Hilary
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:25 AM
How about arbor vitae - they are green and pretty and grow fast - they don't have nasty root systems and will not take over yours and your neighbors farm in 15 minutes when you are not looking. You can plant a line of them and they will look like a hedge in a couple of years.

There's also privet, but I think that takes more maintenence.

Equibrit
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:49 AM
Ditto privet - but you can leave it natural. It grows all over the place here.
http://www.fast-growing-trees.com/Privet.htm?gclid=COeVt9Ht3Z8CFRCenAoduwwyIw
Some folks say it is not suitable around horses - but mine never suffered from it.

pintopiaffe
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:24 PM
Thanks! This gives me a place to start research.

Neighbors are OK--but close, so that side is needing it, but mostly I need it along the road. People stopping to 'pat' and FEED the pretty horses (all of which are attention whores) is the bigger issue. :sigh:

DiablosHalo
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:39 PM
Not sure if it grows in your area- but I planted a row of rosa rogusa for the same reason. Old owners developed the farm except for our square. Neighbors are always walking down sidewalk in front of farm petting them.

They are supposed to grow into a symetrical hedge 6' high and 6' wide. They've been in 2 years and went from 6" to 18"- hopefully will get wider and start filling in this year. I planted them 2' apart so they would grow in quickly.

I ordered from greenview nursery in TN. Google for the site. They tell you all about them and which areas they grow in, etc. Oh- and they are very very low maintenance!

AppJumpr08
Feb. 6, 2010, 10:03 PM
Not sure if it grows in your area- but I planted a row of rosa rogusa for the same reason. Old owners developed the farm except for our square. Neighbors are always walking down sidewalk in front of farm petting them.

They are supposed to grow into a symetrical hedge 6' high and 6' wide. They've been in 2 years and went from 6" to 18"- hopefully will get wider and start filling in this year. I planted them 2' apart so they would grow in quickly.

I ordered from greenview nursery in TN. Google for the site. They tell you all about them and which areas they grow in, etc. Oh- and they are very very low maintenance!



GOOOD IDEA!! They grow like weeds around here. And are prickly. And not fun for climbing through.. .but they smell yummy, and you can make rosehip jam and rose petal syrup too.. :yes:

dmalbone
Feb. 6, 2010, 10:13 PM
Anyone know if the rosa rugosa are toxic to horses? I need something right up near the pasture until the teeny weenie spruces grow up. :p The fence will be hot, but just in case...

AppJumpr08
Feb. 6, 2010, 10:33 PM
I just did some Googling, and according to the ASPCA site, Rosa Species is not toxic to horses... sooo... I would assume Rosa Rugosa must not be toxic. Good to know. I love them, and we have some growing along the fence lines on our new farm...

Trevelyan96
Feb. 6, 2010, 10:38 PM
Do leyland cypress grow that far north? They grow incredibly fast and are quite attractive. Mine will take a bit of them occasionally, but I don't think they're harmful.

MsM
Feb. 7, 2010, 09:43 AM
Just remember the rugosa are deciduous so the privacy part isnt so great in the winter - which I think in your area is like 8 months! :winkgrin: They would be great for keeping people away from the horsies though and dont look like a blockade.
For privacy, I have gone with the abrovitae. Got a deal on some about 5 ft tall for $35 each. Didnt do much for my back but they are on year two and have grown at least a foot! Recently got a couple of smaller ones at the local Lowe's at the "end of season" sale and they were about $10 each for about 3' tall.

starkissed
Feb. 7, 2010, 10:24 AM
please don't plant bamboo. It's a horrible invasive species and basically destroys habitats.

the eastern red cedar is a good choice. They are evergreen and can be trimmed to a hedge. Plus they provide a lot of food for birds and are safe for horses. Grow pretty fast, might be slightly slower up in the NE. This is also a Juniper.

Any type of Ilex (Winterberry)- These grow at a pretty good rate but I don't know how tall they will get for privacy.

Folks around here have made hawethorn hedges- but they are fairly slow to grow- but very attractive finished product.

I would go with a type of ever green tree or shrub.

Ruth0552
Feb. 7, 2010, 11:09 AM
Ditto on the bamboo. Invasive foreign species are not great.

I had some kind of wild Rosa Rugosa at my parents place and I KNOW it is okay for horses. Once the pasture was pretty eaten down the pony started in on the rose bush and she made quite the dent in it. She would only eat the tender young leaves but she would get tiny little scratches on her nose getting to them. Hungry pony (not really hungry- just thought she was hungry).

AppJumpr08
Feb. 7, 2010, 12:17 PM
Do leyland cypress grow that far north? They grow incredibly fast and are quite attractive. Mine will take a bit of them occasionally, but I don't think they're harmful.

I googled them and it looks like they are for zone 6 and warmer... so... not hardy enough for us in the Frozen North :no:

kookicat
Feb. 7, 2010, 05:17 PM
Hawthorne? (http://www.gardenguides.com/462-hawthorne-tree.html)

I don't think that it grows all that fast (mine are mature hedges, so I can't say) but it's pretty to look at and safe for horses.

ReSomething
Feb. 7, 2010, 05:40 PM
What my dad told me years ago was that you have to plan to replace and remove to get a good privacy screen. You plant the fast growers, or something "weedy" in conjunction with something you prefer that is a slow grower with the expectation that a couple of years down the road you'll be ripping something out. What is tough is that some things really only have a three or four year period where they will be great screens, and then they start getting really big or wide or lose their lower branches etc.. Anyway I am afraid I'm down in zone 6b and really can't suggest much. We have Eastern red cedar here, which my DH refers to as somebody's hedge that got away - negatives are they harbor a gall that messes up apples and are not good for firewood. I am sure that other conifers would grow for you but don't forget you'll have to give up about 12 feet of pasture while they are getting established so the horses don't stomp or rub or nibble them to death.

Unprovoked92
Feb. 7, 2010, 06:28 PM
Ditto to the leyland cypress. I have a dozen or so planted along the road front and they grow very fast. Great windbreak as well. I know they need TONS of water when they are first transplanted. I live in the TN mountains and they do well. I grew up in Mass but I don't remember hearing much about them...but I would guess they would do fine up there as its not much warmer down here.

Wind
Feb. 10, 2010, 02:30 PM
How fast do the leyland cypress grow per year? I have a very nosey neighbor who loves to spy with her binoculars. Would like something about 30-40 feet tall. I live in NH.

ChocoMare
Feb. 10, 2010, 02:41 PM
Another vote for the Austree options. UBER fast growers ;)

sketcher
Feb. 10, 2010, 03:31 PM
Privet can be bought bare root in the spring It will take a few years to take off but when it does you will have a nice hedge. You can chop it in half if it is getting out of control and if you decide to get rid of it some day it is relatively easy to chop down and dig up. Ask me how I know. :)

anchodavis
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:00 PM
Try Mugo pines (not dwarf). We planted several little ones in front of our house about five years ago and they are about 4' or so now. Might be slower growing than what you want, but they top out at 6 or so feet, look nice, are easy to trim, and are bushy enough to provide distance between the fence and the people, and prickly enough that people won't want to wade through them. I don't think they are toxic to horses or other animals at all, but be sure to check, and stay away from yew bushes - they look similar and are VERY toxic to horses! While they're growing, a polite sign asking people not to feed or pet your horses may do wonders. :)
On bamboo - once that stuff is established, you can't kill it with a shotgun and you may be battling it forever. I'd avoid it. It's worse than kudzu!

Guin
Feb. 16, 2010, 08:10 PM
There's forsythia. It grows fast and ends up all brushy and bushy. Don't know if it's a problem if the horses eat it, though. Some sort of evergreen like a line of spruces would grow quickly (plus if you plant a couple off to the side, you'll have Christmas trees in a couple of years.)

Trevelyan96
Feb. 17, 2010, 07:28 PM
My Leyland Cypress grow about 3' ft./year I think. My oldest ones on the south side were put in 7 years ago. They were 4 ft trees and they are now up to about 35-40'. I put new 4' ones in last summer on the north fence and they are already up to around 5'. Lovely looking trees, and you can usually get the 4' ones for about $15 apeice, less if you are buying a bunch of them.

My horses do nibble a bit on them.

I also have hedge roses on one fence and those things are georgeous in the summer. They grow incredibly fast as well, but are a PITA to maintain because of the the thorns.

lorilu
Feb. 18, 2010, 09:54 AM
Roses are a nice idea - I have Knockouts and an old fashioned climber planted. BUT, the horses eat everything they can reach.....!


L