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View Full Version : USDA killed NAIS?



Bluey
Feb. 5, 2010, 03:23 PM
No more NAIS, for now, anyway:

http://www.agweb.com/get_article.aspx?src=gennews&pageid=155857

Guess that all your protests helped.;)

tle
Feb. 5, 2010, 08:21 PM
WOOHOO!!!!

SLW
Feb. 5, 2010, 08:30 PM
:)

Chief2
Feb. 6, 2010, 08:52 AM
You mean instead of issuing commands they are actually going to LISTEN???
Wow. What a concept!

Equibrit
Feb. 6, 2010, 08:58 AM
The announcement; http://www.usda.gov/wps/portal/!ut/p/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB/.cmd/ad/.ar/sa.retrievecontent/.c/6_2_1UH/.ce/7_2_5JM/.p/5_2_4TQ/.d/1/_th/J_2_9D/_s.7_0_A/7_0_1OB?PC_7_2_5JM_contentid=2010%2F02%2F0053.xml&PC_7_2_5JM_parentnav=LATEST_RELEASES&PC_7_2_5JM_navid=NEWS_RELEASE#7_2_5JM

shawneeAcres
Feb. 6, 2010, 09:07 AM
that GOD that for once the government is going to stay out of our lives! This was the most ridiculous example of goverment intervention into private lives I have ever seen, and also would have been exhobitantly expensive to implement and monitor. Perhaps they realized that they were going to spend WAY too much money (for once!)

Equibrit
Feb. 6, 2010, 10:15 AM
It wasn't funded - was it?

JSwan
Feb. 6, 2010, 11:57 AM
Equibrit - portions of NAIS had been implemented in the states. I think Wisconsin (?) had some pretty draconian penalities if producers didn't sign up. Don't quote me on that though - not sure it was Wiconsin. Could have been some other state with lots of cows. :winkgrin:

It certainly was a clusterfu** wasn't it. But I think the premise is sound - traceback. Hopefully new measures will prove to be more workable.

Wonder how this is going to affect exports in the short term????? Bluey - do you know? I have no idea.

Equibrit
Feb. 6, 2010, 02:19 PM
If you read this; http://www.aphis.usda.gov/publications/animal_health/content/printable_version/faq_traceability.pdf
you will discover that it is not quite all over.
This appears to be the USDA shifting responsibility and financing to the States, using a "framework" designed by USDA. Sounds like an even bigger cluster***k.

JSwan
Feb. 6, 2010, 02:23 PM
Aha. That would make sense. Shift the requirement onto the states as an unfunded mandate. States have to figure out how to implement and pay for it (passing any costs onto the producer probably) then the program is off the USDA's budget. If a state refuses to cooperate, the feds just threaten to withdraw road money or something.

Well, it was kind of happening already - it was being implemented state by state.

SNAFU. 'Nuff said.

Adamantane
Feb. 9, 2010, 11:02 AM
Here's the message I received from Downsize DC about this:

For four years DC Downsizers joined with other organizations and countless farmers to oppose the National Animal Identification System (NAIS).

Finally, the USDA saw the writing on the wall. It is scrapping NAIS! The USDA still has plans for an animal tracing system, but it is to apply only to animals moving in interstate commerce, meaning . . .

* animal owners won't have to file a report every time an animal leaves their property, whereas under NAIS horseback riders, for instance, would have had to file a report every time they went for a ride]

* there will be no premise registration

* those who raise animals for personal consumption or to sell in local markets won't be part of the new regulatory systemMoreover, the new system promises . . .to focus entirely on animal disease traceability; bogus NAIS justifications such as "terrorism" have been scrapped"allow for maximum flexibility for states, tribal nations, and producers to work together to find identification solutions that meet their local needs"

* encourage low-cost technology; alternatives such as old-fashioned branding will most likely be accepted, instead of expensive RFID tags]

* local and organic farmers will be represented.

We at DownsizeDC.org are realists. We anticipate that as the new system takes shape, new concerns will arise. But think about what just happened . .

The government ended a program because the people did not tolerate it.

We the people DO have the power. We used this power to bring a significant victory for pet owners and livestock producers.

Equibrit
Feb. 9, 2010, 12:49 PM
You're never going to sell a horse across State lines ?

MSP
Feb. 9, 2010, 02:43 PM
I don't see where much has changed. Each state will still need to come up with some way of tracing animals they are just not dictating how.

Tracing still needs to be done when moving from state to state. The state you live in could decide to keep what ever NAIS structure they have in place.

I think they missed their traceability dead line so had to come up with a reason, excuse. It is definitely a wait and see situation.

Now that it doesn't have a name it may be harder to keep up with what is going on.

Equibrit
Feb. 9, 2010, 04:29 PM
It is called .........................tada................

Animal Disease Traceability Framework

JSwan
Feb. 9, 2010, 05:08 PM
S.N.A.F.U.

Equibrit
Feb. 9, 2010, 06:34 PM
... _. ._ .._. .._

That would make a neat signature.

Bluey
Feb. 9, 2010, 08:10 PM
... _. ._ .._. .._

That would make a neat signature.

.-.. --- .-..

That it would.;)

big horse rider
Feb. 10, 2010, 10:23 AM
Equibrit - portions of NAIS had been implemented in the states. I think Wisconsin (?) had some pretty draconian penalities if producers didn't sign up. Don't quote me on that though - not sure it was Wiconsin. Could have been some other state with lots of cows. :winkgrin:

It certainly was a clusterfu** wasn't it. But I think the premise is sound - traceback. Hopefully new measures will prove to be more workable.

Wonder how this is going to affect exports in the short term????? Bluey - do you know? I have no idea.


Wisconsin was the original testing grounds. They threatened us all with fines if we didn't sign up. I don't personally know a single soul who originally signed up. My husband signed us up the first time around because we had cattle to move but when the letter came around to re-sign up I threw it away and other than a couple notices hadn't heard back from them.

We had at the time five pet chickens. Several times we got notices of a chicken disease three hours away. I get the same information in the weekly farm paper.

NAIS was a serious waste of time, money and resources. I am sorry but a 10 cattle operation isn't going to want to microchip everything and then be forced to buy a 2K scanner to scan every time those cattle moved. And chickens? Please. They wanted us to report if number changes. Well, numbers can change overnight via Raccoon.

Also they wanted us to carry an ID card whenever we took a horse off the premises. So a ride to the neighbors, don't forget your card. I told them to tattoo the damn thing on my broad *** and if they want to scan it I'd gladly let them.

If they feel they need to crack down then go to the factory farms where the majority of the problems start and end.

Just my humble opinion.

Bluey
Feb. 10, 2010, 06:09 PM
The story made national news:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/05/business/05livestock.html

MSP
Feb. 11, 2010, 02:20 PM
http://www.thehorse.com/ViewArticle.aspx?ID=15808


In response to a statement by Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has reaffirmed its call for a strong, national animal disease traceability program to help maintain and improve the health of U.S. livestock.

Vilsack announced that the USDA is creating a new strategy for animal disease traceability. This comes in reaction to a public comment period in which the program in place was heavily criticized for being too stringent. (Read more: "USDA to Revise Animal Disease Traceability Approach")

"The USDA is planning to create a new, national animal disease traceability system that is administered by the states and tribal nations. If each state is allowed to develop and implement its own program, important questions arise concerning communication and coordination. Clearly, the USDA must create a system that allows for quick and accurate trace-back across state borders in an animal disease emergency, or there is no point in the new system," said Ron DeHaven, DVM, chief executive officer of the AVMA. "There are many unanswered questions that must be addressed as this new animal disease traceability program is being developed. For that reason, the AVMA cannot consider endorsing this concept at this time."

The AVMA advocates creation of an animal disease traceability program that would allow veterinarians to trace diseased animals back to specific farms or herds in cases of disease outbreaks. This would help identify potentially infected animals, quickly address the disease, and minimize harm other food animals, food producers, and the public.

"The government estimates that this new animal traceability program will take 18 months to two years to create and implement. We are concerned that, in fact, with a formal rulemaking process in place, implementation will be delayed for up to three or four years, and, during that time, the U.S. will continue without an animal disease traceability program," said Larry R. Corry, DVM, president of the AVMA. "Veterinarians are the foot soldiers in the war against livestock diseases, and it's a role that we take extremely seriously. It's critical that federal regulations on this new traceability program include input from the AVMA and veterinarians."


One can only hope we can delay it forever! So is the AVMA saying we have no tractability right now?