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View Full Version : Here's one for the ethicists... found dog



ToTheNines
Feb. 4, 2010, 04:49 PM
About a week ago, a friend brought over a skinny miserable starving dog he found near his house. No collar. It is a tiny mini dachshund. Young but not a baby. Has grown up teeth. It is adorable and I will keep it if I cannot find its owner. That is my dilemna ... I have looked on Craigslist, petfinders, and all the websites for lost dogs. No "lost" ads that fit my pup. I am going to take her to vet and make sure there is no microchip. I think you can feel them at the withers, right? Other than this, how much more do I have to do? The longer I have her, the more attached I am getting.

I am updating this to try to ward off some of the hostile nasty replies I am getting. Thank you to those who gave good advice, and especially to the person who noted that not all persons are computer literate enough to use on-line resources. In light of the hostility here, I do not feel a need to list all the additional measures I have taken to see if this dog has an owner. I will only get criticized for not doing more or not doing things faster. It was in heat when I got it, and it needs to go back to the vet to make sure it is not pregnant, and to get spayed. I have already had it heartworm tested, and got it HW meds. It is not housebroken, and I am investing the time to train it. I have decided I can ethically do those things even though it is not my dog, and I hope I do not hear that it "just might be a champion and I have no right to abort her valuable babies". Honestly that is the sort of replies I am getting.

I realize my original post did sound blase about finding an owner, but I believed that if there were an owner, I would see some sort of effort. Some sort of "lost" posting, but there had been nothing. I also admit that I am a bit callous. "Lost" dogs around here are either dumped or belong to adjoining ranches who do not care for them. A collarless poor-condition unspayed unhousebroken unchipped dog does not spell out "find my owner" to me. She would probably not have survived another night in the sub-freezing cold spell when she was found.

I have lived in this area almost 20 years, and have done my share of trying to find homes. If they wander around long enough, they are shot or poisoned by the goat farmers. I know of ranchers around here who openly proclaim that they will shoot any dog on their property. A good friend had her dog poisoned. I find the whole goat ranching business appalling (they are too small to defend themselves), but I have seen pictures of a field full of dead and dying goats eviscerated by dog packs. You had better believe I keep an eagle eye on my own dogs. Their collars with tags (now both an ID and a chip tag) are never off. Each collar is adjusted so it can slip off if they need it to. They are bright red, and I make sure the neighbors know who my dogs are. Whatever happy endings I recall were for dogs with collars and tags.

My heart goes out to the person with the GP who is lost. I wish the little dog I have was hers. I hope she finds it. One difference between her an my situation is that I'm sure I would see or hear of her efforts by now. Years ago, there was a magnificant GP living feral in the woods behind my back pasture. I would see him once in a while in the distance like a ghost. He belonged to a neighbor who said she "couldn't catch him". That is the sort of "lost dog" situation that happens around here.

Oh yeah, I this little dog microchipped when I had her scanned. I have not sent the papers in yet and if an owner shows up, they can do so. I think I am within suitable ethics to do so, but I am sure I will hear otherwise. The main thing I am getting out of this experience (other than nastiness) is that it is simple and easy to microchip your dog. You get a bright yellow tag that shouts out "I have an owner who wants me back". The other overlying message seems to be that dog overpopulation is a huge problem. Look up a rescue for your breed. There will be hundreds. Both the "pets" and "lost and found" sections of craigslist are long and active (and full of the usual CL nuts). Cute litte Shozti goes in heat or starts yipping or is difficult to housetrain, and she gets ousted.

Another tip for people who lose dogs in rural areas. Teach your dog to "speak". I taught my corgi that as mostly a trick because she was always going into stalls to eat poop and getting shut in. Saved her life when a neighbor put out havaheart traps for coons. I could not find her and as I searched I yelled "speak" "speak". Heard her from at least 1/2 mile away and found her in a trap.

trubandloki
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:03 PM
I can not imagine having a stray dog for a week and it has not been scanned to see if it has a chip or not. Read the thread here about a COTH member who has been looking for her dog all this time. Why are you waiting?

If you are using miserable and starving as your excuse remember that if the dog ran off and has been missing for a time it could get miserable and starving even if it did not start that way.

A scared loose dog can run a lot further than we like to think they can. So make sure you are contacting the agencies in your surrounding areas also.

All three of my dogs have chips and I can not feel any of them. On a tiny dog I do not know since none of mine are tiny. But I would not assume that since you can not feel it there is no chip there.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:04 PM
I say no chip, no ads, he's yours, and VERY lucky!!!

ToTheNines
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:08 PM
That is part of my question, I read that you can feel a chip at the withers, and it seems like you should be able to on a dog that small and thin skinned. It is the size of a grain of rice. Also, she was weak and starving. I will take her to the vet in a day or two when she is stronger.

BLBGP
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:08 PM
Have you called your local shelter to report a found dog? Why do you have to wait until she is stronger to take her to the vet? If she was s bad off that you think she needs her strength back before going anywhere, then a vet would have been my first stop.

You can't always feel microchips. Also, a good percentage of people (especially little old ladies who often own that breed of dog) don't know how to post online, so they call or visit the local shelter.

I know you feel like you're doing best for this little dog, but by not looking for a microchip or calling your shelter, you're doing the potential owner a disservice.

joiedevie99
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:10 PM
You need to call the shelters in the area, and any local vets. Take her in ASAP for a micro chip scan- you can't always feel it. If no one knows anything about her, and you don't get any calls back from the shelters in the next few weeks- you probably have a new dog.

trubandloki
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:10 PM
The dog does not have to be strong to be scanned....Call the shelter, call the vet, and find out.

Try thinking about the shoe being on the other foot. What if you lost your dog? How would you feel if someone was harboring it and refusing to do their due diligence to find its owner. Checking out CL and Petfinder are not enough.

Alagirl
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:12 PM
That is part of my question, I read that you can feel a chip at the withers, and it seems like you should be able to on a dog that small and thin skinned. It is the size of a grain of rice. Also, she was weak and starving. I will take her to the vet in a day or two when she is stronger.


LOL, you are supposed to take a dog to the vet when he's weak and starved, just to make sure that groceries is all you need. :lol:

While the chips are rather larger, they can also wander a bit, so squishing around on a dog's neck would not me conclusive I'd think.

Considering the tards in my area, I would not be surprised if dog was thrown out once puppy hood was over and the novelty wore off, or the incoming adult teeth lay waste to some 'precious' possessions. :rolleyes:

didgery
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:22 PM
I had a situation last year that brought up some ethical questions. In that case, I found a nervous, emaciated dog in the road. I rang a couple of local doorbells and was told that the dog had been hanging around for a while, so I took her with me and gave her to this fabulous woman I knew. She took her straight to the vet and had her doctored (treated for worms and diarrhea) while I called the pound to ask whether she'd been reported as lost. The vet found a microchip that identified her address as RIGHT where I'd found her (a door I'd actually knocked at, but with no answer).

After agonizing for a day or so about what to do, my friend and I agreed that I would call the number on the microchip and find out the story. Was the dog neglected, starving, and left loose as a matter of course, or had she been lost in the wilds of somewhere else and made her way back home to her beloved masters just that morning??

I made the call, and framed it as, "we found this dog, we LOVE this dog, we can guarantee this dog a safe forever home if by any chance you don't want her, but we learned today that she belongs to you." They, it turns out, didn't give a $#!T about the dog one way or another and they were even so kind as to meet my friend and sign her microchip paperwork to transfer the file to new ownership.

I think my friend would have always lived with the twin fears of, "what if I've stolen someone's beloved dog?" and, "what if this dog is microchipped in the name of bad people—and what if she gets lost and is returned not to me, but to THEM?" had she not had the scan.

I would go ahead and prepare yourself to have a frank conversation with your little dog's owners if there IS a microchip. Just say that if there's any chance this dog will not be cherished in it's legal home, you would be more than happy to assume ownership. Don't accuse or blame, but just state your willingness to keep the foundling.

Otherwise, I believe that in our area the legal obligation is to notify the animal shelter, allow them to conduct a free scan for a microchip, and wait 30 days for owner claims. After that, the dog is yours.

Good luck with whatever shakes down . . .

MistyBlue
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:32 PM
My dogs ahve always been chipped. They're not always easy to find/feel by hand. Some wander, some just aren't easy to feel.
If you call the vet they'll most likely scan the dog for free, takes 2 seconds. But I would have a severely emaciated dog looked at anyways...just a wellness exam to see if any blood tests are warrented that might be a secondary reason for it's condition.

Trevelyan96
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:45 PM
My little guy was adopted from the local shelter, he had come in as a stray. He is now not only chipped, but he also wears a collar with the Home Again tag AND a brass tag with his name and my phone #, because he is a serial escapee. He was quite skinny when we first brought him home, but I would have been heartbroken if in those early days, before we learned how talened a jumper he was, he had gotten off and not been returned to me by someone who just saw a skinny stray with no collar and assumed he was neglected. There were actually quite a few phone calls from home again about a month after his arrival, because he was new to us so the neighbors didn't know who he belonged to.

Now that I've had him for a bit, and know how prone he is to running off when he has a chance, I often wonder if his former owner is still mourning the loss of this wonderful little guy. I can even understand why he was so skinny, as he's a picky eater and will not eat when he's alone and confined.

OP, please take your pup to the vet or shelter and have it scanned.

BuddyRoo
Feb. 4, 2010, 05:47 PM
A lost dog may not be a dumped dog. Maybe someone was house sitting, maybe the owner died...who knows...it could've been thin because it's been lost for so long.

You call the animal shelter/AC (most places require this by law!), you call local veterinarians, you put an ad in the paper (it's free in most places when you find a pet), you put up signs in your area.

It may well be a much loved and missed companion!

And no, you can't always feel a chip.

And yes, they sometimes migrate.

And no, not all chips can be read by the same reader so unless someone has a universal reader, that's no guarantee.

Look...please make every effort to find the dog's owner.

A few years ago, I was new to the area. I had let my dog out to pee and he didn't come back which was really odd. I called friends/coworkers. Had 30 people out canvassing the area, whistling, door knocking, calling my dog's name. I slept by the sliding door with it open all night...in DECEMBER.

No dog.

I called the sheriff's dept, AC, every vet in town, he had a collar and tags on him and everything.

Two days later as I left my driveway on my way to work, I saw in the distance a woman walking a dog. It was MY DOG.

I drove over. And the gal said, "Oh, are you sure we can't keep him? He's so great with the kids, blah blah blah"

Yeah. Her kids had been out the night my dog disappeared...eating pizza on the back porch. They took him in to their house. She acknowledged that he had been whining and crying to get out...that she heard people hollering and whistling. She admitted she'd seen my signs out. She admitted she hadn't reported it to the authorities. SHE WANTED MY DOG. And she continued to ask if I was sure I wanted him. HELL YES I WANTED MY DOG BACK.

It was freaking creepy.

Doodlebug1
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:05 PM
Sorry, I do my best to not write strongly worded messages on here - but WTF??? Why do you even think this is an ethical question? However attached you may be getting, she is not (yet) your dog to get attached to.

Do your best to find the owner. Yes that owner may not care, may have neglected the dog etc - but the outcome will surely be that you at worst pay a few bucks and keep the dog.

On the other hand there may be a sobbing child or distraught house-sitter, relative etc who had been caring for the dog in the owner's absence. Dachshund's may be small and cute but they are hunting dogs, she could easily have strayed. A caring owner will be having all sorts of scenarios running through their head, imagining their puppy hit by a car; imagining her stolen (which she has been if you want the ethical discussion..), imagining her not being loved; imagining her trapped somewhere; imagining her in a fight with a bigger, stronger dog.

Do the right thing. Your friend who brought the dog to you didn't. It's your turn to make amends. Be selfish about eating candy - not about a living creature. There may be someone devastated about losing her.

Sorry if this comes across as harsh - but just read some of the heartbreaking threads on here of people who loved their dogs very, very much and have lost them.

Oh, and as many people have said, you can't feel a chip - and if she has been so abused surely she needs worming and medical attention. Surely if you are a responsible, caring person you'd make sure she has all the vaccinations a puppy her age should have that her uncaring previous owners didn't give her - without them you'll kill her anyway by exposing her to fatal viruses.

I'm sorry, I should probably delete this, it is by far the strongest worded thread I've ever written, but I just can't rationalise your thought process at all; all I can see is someone saying they're responsible and being anything but.

Bogie
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:15 PM
It can be heartbreaking to lose a dog so you do need to see if someone is looking for it.

That said, sometimes people do just discard animals :no:. I found a siamese cat living at an apartment complex many years ago. When I finally was able to tempt her (with food) into being caught I discovered she'd been declawed front and back.

I posted some signs and got a call right away. Yeah, some guy said. It was my mother's cat and she didn't want it any more so she let it outside :mad:.

If this dog gets claimed there are so many dogs who DO need good homes. Get thee to a shelter! Both my dogs came from a local shelter and they are great (My westie was picked up by the dog control officer who brought him to a no-kill shelter. The shelter located his "family." They didn't want him because he would run out the front door and when he got picked up, cost them $$ in fines. Pure bred Westie! He was a year old and hadn't been neutered. that was 9 years ago and he's been a really great family dog for us since them!)

RHdobes563
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:17 PM
When I used to rescue dogs (by paying the "buy" fee at the animal shelter), I would put a "found" ad in our newspaper (free). There are people here who still would NOT think to call the shelter to ask if their dog had been picked up by them or found by a private person and reported.

I would put a general description, "Found, Doberman" or "Found, Sheltie" and then leave it up to the caller to tell me the color, sex, fixed or not, and any other identifying thing.

The only dog I can remember getting a call about was my red Doberman, Garnet. He had a tattoo (which I mentioned in the ad). Someone called (not the owner) wondering what king of tattoo a dog would have (think "Mom" or "Biker"). He wasn't the owner, just curious. Garnet's tattoo was actually a 3-digit number.

Garnet was starved and totally unsocialized when I "adopted" him. I have a feeling that someone was simply tired of him and let him loose. Thank God, the good Samaritans who saw him running loose on the highway stopped, coaxed him into their car, and took him to the animal shelter.

Good luck on the little guy. I hope it works out for the best for all.

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:24 PM
I wouldn't wait to take the pup to the vet. She needs medical attention now if she is weak and undernourished.

She could have a whole lot of things - Giardia, coccidia, parvo etc. - that will get worse if not treated and could kill her.

I used to pull pups from our local shelters for border collie rescue, and I have seen little pups with not much in reserve go down really fast. Like, overnight.

Not trying to be an alarmist. But really, she needs to see a vet immediately.

enjoytheride
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:29 PM
Someone on another BB found a pitbull. Scars around the face, back end full of scars and open wounds, lame behind, ears cut with scissors.

She did the good thing and looked for the owners.

Found the owners who picked the dog up. Said that it had gotten loose off its chain (where it LIVES FULL TIME). The injuries were from being attacked by another dog on the property several times.

Dog finder offered to purchase the dog, but the owners declined and said they planned to breed her so she could buy a puppy.

Lori B
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:34 PM
OP, please tell us you are off doing the right thing and getting this dog scanned, posting photos, calling the local shelters, and generally trying to help this dog find its home. Right?

You don't actually have an ethical dilemma. You are just getting attached to a dog that you KNOW isn't yet yours to get attached to. Right? Right?

If unclaimed, you may claim her. But not yet.

Gunnar
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:35 PM
Someone on another BB found a pitbull. Scars around the face, back end full of scars and open wounds, lame behind, ears cut with scissors.

She did the good thing and looked for the owners.

Found the owners who picked the dog up. Said that it had gotten loose off its chain (where it LIVES FULL TIME). The injuries were from being attacked by another dog on the property several times.

Dog finder offered to purchase the dog, but the owners declined and said they planned to breed her so she could buy a puppy.


Sicko I say!

Griffyn
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:39 PM
My Boston Terrier got out of his (fenced) back yard got spooked and was gone for 3 days. WE searched high and low, and did EVERYTHING right(postered, walked, called) He wasnt returned till someone who had him (in their house) called the local shelter and reported him. Yes, they wanted to keep him, and would have, except that he was on file. I went down immediately confirmed it was him and gave them 100$ for doing the right thing. Make the call.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:55 PM
1. VET immediately!
2. Flyer/notice at local PetSmart, Petco, etc.
3. Call to shelter
4. Check lost and found in paper

After exhausting these avenues, I think you can ethically keep the dog.

ToTheNines
Feb. 4, 2010, 06:57 PM
Geez, sorry I asked. She is going to the vet tomorrow to get scanned. She was found in an extremely rural area where dogs are dumped all the time. It is very sad, and I have lost count of the dogs for whom I have tried to find owners. There never are owners. I have a neighbor who has seven dogs, most of them he found wandering around. The nearest shelter from my friend who found the pup is at least 50 miles away. My friend knows his nearest neighbors and it is not any of theirs. Guess I should have explained this to the city folks. I will put out some signs though, on the chance there is someone out there looking for this dog whose own efforts are not working. The main difference with this dog and the normal dumped dog is that she is tiny and cute and I want to keep her. There is no way I could go through the effort you people are advising for every dog I found around here. Sad but true.

vacation1
Feb. 4, 2010, 08:01 PM
The dog has several possible origins:

1) Neighbor lost or evicted dog.
2) Resident who is not a neighbor who has lost or evicted dog.
3) Non-resident who passed through and lost or evicted dog.

You've ruled out #1. The dog's type and size make #2 less likely given the distance between very rural dwellings. #3 still appears to be on the table, but you seem to reject the idea that a non-resident could have lost the dog as opposed to abandoning it. I'm not quite sure I follow this reasoning, except that it does make the whole situation a lot easier for you.

Alagirl
Feb. 4, 2010, 09:01 PM
Geez, sorry I asked. She is going to the vet tomorrow to get scanned. She was found in an extremely rural area where dogs are dumped all the time. It is very sad, and I have lost count of the dogs for whom I have tried to find owners. There never are owners. I have a neighbor who has seven dogs, most of them he found wandering around. The nearest shelter from my friend who found the pup is at least 50 miles away. My friend knows his nearest neighbors and it is not any of theirs. Guess I should have explained this to the city folks. I will put out some signs though, on the chance there is someone out there looking for this dog whose own efforts are not working. The main difference with this dog and the normal dumped dog is that she is tiny and cute and I want to keep her. There is no way I could go through the effort you people are advising for every dog I found around here. Sad but true.


Yeah, would have helped to clarify.

JSwan
Feb. 4, 2010, 09:11 PM
Some states have regulations or statutes that establish how long an animal has to be held or fostered until it can be put up for adoption/considered abandoned.

When you report her to the shelter - ask them how long that period is.

It's nice that you're thinking of keeping her, and if her owner does not show up to claim her, I hope that's what you do. Just do your best to find the owner - I like to contact several shelters because animals can really travel far in a short period of time.

Good luck.

SmokenMirrors
Feb. 4, 2010, 09:19 PM
ToTheNines...I noticed you live in TX...I use to live in Copperas Cove...Let me tell you something...yes you CAN go to every county, animal control, SPCA, pizza delivery, post office, etc...it CAN be done and you know how I know? I had my registered Siberian Husky bitch stolen one afternoon out of my backyard along with my mixed Malamute/GSD. He came back 10hrs later but no Cheyenne, and believe me, I even went looking for her on horse back, I spent weeks searching, calling, walking, riding, and even answered the sicko's who felt they needed to call me to ask if the reward offered for my girl would be given if she was found dead....I never found her.

I am sure you also have a telephone, use it along with a telephone book. Yes, Texas is a big state, so are some of the towns and the little podunk towns as well. It rubbed me wrong you are so blase` about the whole thing, then assuming that were "city folk". I certainly am not, just a dog owner who lost a member of her family and will NEVER get closure because some person decided my girl was better suited for them....

Huntertwo
Feb. 4, 2010, 11:29 PM
The OP did state that her friend had the dog first. Give her a break as she might have just recently taken in the dog.

I personally feel if all the ads have been checked, the newspaper, pet finder, Vets, obviously the owner is not seriously looking for this dog.

No collar with a license is not very responsible either for a serious pet owner.

How far could a little Dachshund could have traveled anyway without falling prey to Coyotes or other predators?

Perhaps the owner is close by and just doesn't give a darn.

blueboo
Feb. 5, 2010, 12:38 AM
No collar with a license is not very responsible either for a serious pet owner.



Just have to chime in here - I have 2 Rat Terriers 2 Pyrs, and a lab/setter mix (think appaloosa labrador :D). They ALL have collars with tags, (and yes, chips). BUT. The collars are very loose. I want there to be absolutely no chance of one of them going into a brush pile, or under a fence, or wherever, and hanging themselves. If I walk them on a lead, they wear either a harness or a choke chain - that comes off the minute the walk is done.

So 'no collar' is NOT prima facie evidence of an uncaring owner. Believe me - you'd have to search far and wide to find 5 more loved, cared for and yes, spoiled, dogs.

jetsmom
Feb. 5, 2010, 02:15 AM
Get it scanned, and if it has an owner, call owner and ask if they own a dog like that. I'd also ask them to provide proof of dog's vaccinations/vet record to prove that the dog was cared for and not let to get in that condition during their ownership. If they can't prove the dog has been seen by a vet in the last year, then I would try to make them think that the dog will be being treated at the vet's for starvation, getting a checkup and vaccinations, and they'll just need to pay the vet to pick it up. If they care about their dog, they'll have vet records, and have no problem with getting the dog checked out due to it's condition. If they caused it to be in that condition, they'll probably tell you that you can pay the vet bill and keep it.

If there is no microchip, I'd post an ad in the paper, plus notify AC. I'd do the above if someone responds, plus require that they get a microchip in order to get the dog returned. (My city requires microchips, so I may have an easier time getting someone to agree to that, than you would).

I guess I'd just want to make sure that they didn't starve the dog, and will take care of him upon return. I know if one of mine ever got loose and starved for months before being found, I'd do anything to get them back...jump thru hoops, pay vet bills, etc. You do need to make a valid effort to find the owner.

EponaRoan
Feb. 5, 2010, 03:34 AM
Pets 911:

http://www.pets911.com/

IMO, you have to make an effort in good faith to find the owner. You never know what the backstory might be ...

elysian*fields*farm
Feb. 5, 2010, 03:35 AM
Take the dog to the vet ASAP-- like later this morning. Have her scanned, and if there is a microchip-- make the call. You find her adorable after just a week-- imagine how her owners probably feel about her.

If there is no microchip, call the local shelters or vets to see if a dog matching her description has been reported missing. If so, get the number and make the call. That is the least you should do.

If there is no mirochip, and if no dog matching her description is listed at the shelter or in the paper, then you can consider whether you have done enough, or whether you need to put up flyers etc.

a true story-- Once I found an English Bulldog sitting in the middle of the highway in the rain-- No collar. I got him out of the road, and took him to PetsMart where I was working the adoption tables for a cat rescue. He was dirty, wet and stinky so I had him bathed while I was there.

Several people wanted him, though one man said by this teeth, he seemed quite old. He offered to take as did a woman who had a bully with her, but I didn't give him away. Someone said that breeders often abandon old dogs. I had always wanted a bulldog, but could not afford one. I began to think about keeping him. After all, he had been in the rain in the middle of a state highway.

I took him back home and looked at the notice boards at the grocery and feed store-- no fliers listing a missing bulldog.

I took him home and settled him in a kennel in the house. I treid several names like "Winston" or "Churchie" or "Bubba" but got no noticable response. But he was just so cute. And he played fetch if I rolled a ball across the floor. And he was just so ugly, he was cute. He made all sorts of grunting and snuffling sounds that sounded cute, too. And he didn't pay any attention to the cats.

I made flyers and went to post them. While I was posting the flyer at the local grocery, one of the town police officers saw me. She said that one of the officers was away on vacation and that his brother-in-law was caring for his bulldog "Rebel", and that he had called the station to report the dog missing that morning.

She said she would call the man so he could identify the dog. I went home and called "Rebel" and the dog nearly turned the crate over trying to wag his almost non-existant tail -- he wagged his whole rear end-- and though short, he must have weighed 70 lbs.

Then I got the call -- the man described "Rebel" perfectly, and within twenty minutes he was at my house to pick him up.

Two days later, a police cruiser pulled up. It was Rebel's owner. His family had gotten home from a vacation to Disneyworld. His brother-in-law had just confessed about Rebel's adventure, and he had come to offer me a reward.

He explained that he ahd his wife had gotten Rebel and a girl bully as puppies when they were first married, and the dogs were like kids to them. the girl dog Dinah had passed away earlier that year. Rebel was indeed old for a bulldog-- he was nine.

He actually teared up when he told me that he didn't know what he would have done if he had gotten home to find out Rebel was missing, or even worse, had been killed on the highway. Rebel was an inside dog, but the brother-in-law hadn't fully closed the screen door when he had gone to feed him, and that is how Rebel had gotten out of the house in the first place.

When I would not take the reward, he insisted in paying me back for having Rebel bathed. (he hates baths) And he insisted in making a donation to the cat rescue I voluneered for.

Though he did live on the same highway outside of my small town (pop 1,200) I found Rebel a good 7 miles from his driveway-- and his house was a half mile back from the highway.

So take that little dog to the vet, have her scanned, look in the paper and call the vets' offices or shelters near you.

trubandloki
Feb. 5, 2010, 08:59 AM
No collar with a license is not very responsible either for a serious pet owner.



You are kidding, aren't you?

Oh please!

I am a very serious dog owner. None of my dogs wear their collars in the house. A collar is dangerous to leave on a dog when it is crated and unsupervised (think nylon halter in turn out). And in the case of two of my three causes irritation and a rash. Collars go on for walks and are promptly removed when we get back home.

I also do not like jingling tags (because I think it is bad for the dog). So their rabies tag and license tag are not on their collars. They do all have a tag riveted to their collar with the phone number on it (thank you smartpak).

All three dogs are microchipped. Though you can not feel the chip with your fingers so someone like the OP would assume there is not one. And you would assume my dogs are not owned by someone who cares about them because they are not wearing a collar with jingling tags.


OP, I know you are going to believe what you want to believe. But I will say it again. A loose scared dog can travel much further than you would imagine. Just because this cute little dog was found out in the middle of no where does not mean it did not get there on its own.

And what is so hard about calling or emailing all the shelters and vets in your area? I would think you would feel better in the end knowing you did everything you could to find this dogs owner than just sitting back and saying 'oh well, they must not have cared'.

People do not usually just dump small dogs. They are easy to place.

Great story Elysian!

moonriverfarm
Feb. 5, 2010, 10:56 AM
My two cents:
I have six chihuahuas. Not one wears a collar. Not one is microchipped. They are inside dogs who are never let out without me watching them. And we live a mile back in the woods, away from the road.
I take them with me to Starbucks and Tractor Supply once a week, when i get feed and lattes. It's the highlight of their week. One of the dogs, Daisy, is a rescue I got as an adult from a backyard breeder, and she has never been a pet. She is only bonded with me and is terrified of everyone else.
Somehow, without me knowing, she slipped out of the back of the truck when I was loading feed. I did not see her. i got down the road and realized there were only 5 in the car and went back. She had already disappeared. TS is on a busy 4 lane highway surrounded by a few warehouses and lots of hayfields. i searched for five hours until dark and cried all night. Before leaving to go home I wrote ONE note and left it on a warehouse door. Long shot, but I had a feeling. Well, at 7 the next morning i got a call from the warehouse folks that they saw her behind the building. I am 30 mins from there but raced over. i told them she would not come to anyone so just to try to watch where she went. It was pouring rain and i took my little male chi with me (he's brave). No Daisy anywhere. After 45 minutes I about gave up when she came out of the woods. That dog would have never come to anyone else and without a doubt would have died or been killed in short order.And i would have never ever ever forgiven myself.
So there are lots of ways dogs can get lost from their owners. All you can do is try as hard as you can, in good conscience, to let the public know you found a dog and see who comes forward - or doesn't. After exhausting all efforts, you can know you did all you could to find the owner. Because if they are out there missing their dog, it is hell.

Brookes
Feb. 5, 2010, 12:38 PM
No, no and oh hell no breeders don't just "dump older dogs". Where on God's green earth did you get that wild idea???? Now if you are talking about puppy mills those are not breeders, they are animal abusers. Huge difference.

My dogs also do not wear collars unless they are leaving the property. For all the reasons mentioned above and more.

For the person that basically suggested holding the dog hostage while a possibly distraught owner proves vet records etc. The op has no legal or moral right to hold this dog hostage while the owner proves their worth. If the dog has escaped and has been lost it is up to the op to turn over every single stone to find the owner. If the owner is a dirtbag then it is your moral responsibility to report them to animal control.

If you had my dog and I later found out that you had not done anything to try to reunite us I would be beyond pissed off as I would imagine most responsible dog owners would be. My dogs are worth a serious sum of money, I'm wondering if this would be considered theft if someone found my dog and did nothing to reunite us. I would be interested to know what others think of this. For all you know this (if it is intact) could be a very valuable animal in more ways than someone's beloved pet.

S*it happens and dogs get out, lost etc. You have zero right to keep a dog that you found without doing everything possible to find it's owner. Even if the owner is a dirtbag. It is their dog not yours.

You also have every right to ask the owner for costs incurred by you to be reimbursed for your care of their dog.

In the mean time please take that poor animal to the vet, have it scanned, and it's health checked. If the owners can be found and they are responsible they will reimburse you for this gladly and thank you profusely for helping their animal.

This is not your dog until you prove that it has no other owner PERIOD.

Mozart
Feb. 5, 2010, 12:58 PM
I think you have some more due diligence to do before you can ethically keep this dog.

Call all shelters/pounds within 20 mile radius and ask if anyone has reported this dog a missing.

Call all vets within similar radius and see if any owners have reported a missing dachsund.

Take to your local vet and have him scanned, check for tatoos. A big story in our local paper..someone recently got a cat returned to them on the basis of a tatoo.....14 YEARS after the cat went missing! They were thrilled to have the old cat back.

If all the above is negative...I say you can keep the dog. I would not go so far as putting up fliers or posting notices...I think that is the owner's responsibility.

And, I will admit to NOT having returned lost dogs in the past. A friend and I found two dogs trying to cross a busy highway. We stopped, picked up them up, took them home. Called shelters, local pound, humane society, etc. Nothing. Checked paper. Nothing. After a few days my friend noticed one of the dogs had a tatoo...way down in ear. Made some calls, dog's vet clinic was tracked down. Owner was contacted. He said he had the male dog neutered at that vet clinic to try to stop his roaming. Said this was the third time that month they had taken off. They were habitual roamers and he made no efforts to contain them. One was the sire of the unaltered female.

He wanted one back (the female) but was not interested in the pointer cross male as he was short coated and they were "sick of watching him shiver all winter". Oh, and could we hang onto the dogs for a week as he wasn't going to be in our area for a while (he lived maybe 25 minutes away).

Friend and I discussed situation and decided dogs would be entering the "Doggie Witness Protection Program".

Guy called back a week later to make arrangements to pick them up, he was told "oh we are so sorry, we let them out to pee and they ran away".

Yea, ran away to great new homes and I know both of them are currently living he life of Reilly.

So....you need to make inquiries but if the dog is going to go back to a bad situation...I would not lose any sleep about not returning the dog.

But you need to do your due diligence first.

AnotherRound
Feb. 5, 2010, 01:24 PM
Geez, sorry I asked. She is going to the vet tomorrow to get scanned.

Well she wasn't when you made the original post. You wanted people to tell you how you could find the chip yourself.

Alot about your original post shows a lack of ethics.

So. Ethics. Lets see, yes, hmmm. OK, so I have a nice miniature dachshund which I love enought to get microchipped. That way, I figure, if he ever gets lost or (horrors) stolen, he can be tracked, or I have a better chance of having him returned. Then, the unthinkable happens. He races out of the house one day, and chases something into the woods. Weeks go by. No Schatzi anywhere to be found!! I worry, is he starving, the whole schmeal. come to find out, he's been found by a person. Emaciated, frightened, and does she take him to the vet for worming and shots? No. Does she go to get him scanned? No. What do I think of this person, once I get my precious Schatzi back? I won't say it here. Suffice to say I don't think very much of that person's ethics.

I think its unethical of you not to take the dog to the vet to get wormed and checked out to make sure he's ok, and to find out what I should be feeding, or not feeding him. Emaciated is bad, his organs could be starting to fail, and food may kill him. But no, you don't take him to the vet.

I think its unethical of you to contemplate that he might have a chip, but you don't take him to get scanned. Why? You like him, you're getting attached to him, and you say he's too ill to go to eh vet.

Ethics? Yeah, you need some ethics. Ethically you found the dog and you're avoiding taking him to the vet because it might uncover the owner. Since you asked, you're ethics stink.

ToTheNines
Feb. 5, 2010, 02:19 PM
Took her to the vet, she is not chipped. I did not think she would be as she is not spayed either. I am trying to determine if it has an owner (I still think there is a good chance it was dumped), thanks for the suggestions to those of you that were helpful and not snarky.

MadeYaLook
Feb. 5, 2010, 02:47 PM
Jingling tags are bad for a dog??? WTF!!! I do agree that collars can be a concern- but that being said if it is loose enough it does somewhat lower the chances of something happening. Yes I have heard of nylon collars being irritating to some dogs if thats the case try a nice rolled leather one.
All that rant being said I have found numerous dogs that had they had a collar with some sort of ID I would have gladly taken said dog to his home and owners. Watching your dogs every minute sounds great , but as a previous poster said she did not realize that one of her dogs slipped away- it happens all the time to even the most responible owner.

midkniggit
Feb. 5, 2010, 03:10 PM
I'd also like to remind people to make certain their pets microchip registry has current contact info. Last summer I found a young cat wandering outside my apartment. He was very much a people cat, and definitely an indoor cat.

Since I already had two cats of my own, I took him first to the vet to get an FIV/FeLeuk test, and we found out he had a microchip. The vet told me the number and I called the microchip company. The company told me that the chip had never been registered, and that the cat had probably been chipped by a rescue or shelter that would have given the blank paperwork to the adopter, but could not give me any more information. I posted signs and a found ad on craigslist, called the shelters and animal control, and kept my eye out for signs and ads, but no luck. I kept him and love him to death, but if his owner had just registered the chip, he could have gone home. I did end up suspecting he was dumped, since I lived in the college student areas during move-out.

Kate66
Feb. 5, 2010, 03:57 PM
I googled "lost mini daschund texas" and found loads of sites that list lost dogs. You might want to take a look at some of these. This one had pages and pages of lost dogs in texas - sad.

http://www.flealess.org/lostpets/texas.html

A collar can come off, so just because she doesn't have one, doesn't mean that she didn't. I get so fed up with my guys suddenly showing up at the door with no collar and tags gone. I don't keep a stock of name tags in the house, so when they lose them it invariably takes me weeks to replace (the tags, not the collar).

wendy
Feb. 5, 2010, 04:30 PM
, she is not chipped. I did not think she would be as she is not spayed either.
that's an interesting "leap of logic". Lots of people own valuable show/sporting dogs who are not neutered and are definitely chipped. Plus how do you know she is not spayed? you can't tell by looking.
Collars get slipped, dogs get out of cars and fences, the only reason you think this dog is a deliberate dump is the location where she was found.

trubandloki
Feb. 5, 2010, 04:44 PM
On the jingling tag thing - tell me how you would like having something that makes that much noise next to your ears all day? Add that their ears are more sensitive than yours. Let me get you a nice big cow bell for you to wear around your neck all day and we can see how you like it.

You do not have to agree with me but it is not going to change my mind that it is not safe for a dog to wear a collar while caged during the day. No safer than I think it is for my horses to wear a nylon halter while turned out. And a collar that would break when my dog is caught will not something I want to use. It does not matter what kind of collar my dog wears, she gets a rash.

Are you saying that a dog with out a collar but with a microchip is not properly identified and you would not go thru the trouble of returning a dog with a microchip?

Not wearing a collar in the house does not make someone a bad pet owner. I can guarantee you that even my vet, let alone my friends and obedience training buddies, would laugh at you if you suggested I was not a good dog owner.

ToTheNines
Feb. 5, 2010, 05:22 PM
Just took my own dog to get chipped. Should have done it long ago, but this thread made me realize what a risk I was taking. Took 5 minutes at the vet. Did not even need an appointment. Cost $40. In this day and age, seems like not chipping is sort of dumb (easy for me to say, now that I got around to it). He came out from the chipping wagging and happy, so it did not seem painful to him.

citydog
Feb. 5, 2010, 05:52 PM
For the person that basically suggested holding the dog hostage while a possibly distraught owner proves vet records etc. The op has no legal or moral right to hold this dog hostage while the owner proves their worth. If the dog has escaped and has been lost it is up to the op

Not sure which post you're referring to, but a *lot* of people troll the "found" ads looking for free dogs. I'll post a generic "found" ad but no picture, but I'll make sure the people claiming it as theirs have either vet records to prove it or pictures of the dog.

As for the ethics involved, dogs can travel surprising distances when lost, dogs can jump out of cars during a stop, a dog might get picked up buy a less-than-ethical person, transported a distance and then dumped by that second party some distance from where it was found.

You frequently can't feel microchips, and you absolutely can't tell for certain just by looking that a dog has been spayed.

I'd implore anyone who finds a dog to contact all vets and shelters within a 25 mile radius as well as any applicable breed rescue for the region with a general description of the dog. If you aren't 100% positive of the breed or mix (and even the pros can only correctly ID a mix about one in four times) then stick to descriptors like "medium-sized black dog with some white, floppy ears, short coat, male". That way if someone calls looking for their Lab mix, the shelter worker doesn't skip the info for a "pit mix" or "smooth coat BC mix" or whatever.

Huntertwo
Feb. 5, 2010, 05:55 PM
You are kidding, aren't you?

Oh please!



Oh please, yourself...:rolleyes:

I have two Chihuahuas who always go outside with their collars on. Once they are in the house the collars come off.
Not too hard to bend down and take the collars off.

Jingling collars? Nope, not a problem. In order to get a license around here you need a rabies certificate.

So one tag is all you need on the collar.

EponaRoan
Feb. 5, 2010, 06:00 PM
Cute story about the Bulldog. I don't consider 9 terribly old - I had a few that lived to be about 12 and one who was almost 16 when I had to have him euthanized due to the infirmities of old age as they say. :(

As people have said, collars can come off, break or be taken off by other parties. Tags come off too. My dogs are microchipped and generally have their collars on unless I'm cleaning the dogs or collars. They actually like/seek out having collars or leashes put on - funny creatures!

While I can understand (and in some cases support) doggie/kitty witness relocation programs, imo it is stealing. Just depends on if you can live with the consequences and/or moral implications - it's sort of like the difference between stealing a loaf of bread to feed your starving child or yourself or stealing a carton of cigarettes ... I'd cut people some slack on the one and not on the other. :cool:

Huntertwo
Feb. 5, 2010, 06:04 PM
that's an interesting "leap of logic". Lots of people own valuable show/sporting dogs who are not neutered and are definitely chipped. Plus how do you know she is not spayed? you can't tell by looking.


Her Vet could have shaved the area and possibly didn't see a scar.

I had this happen to a stray I picked up once. Brought her to the Vet to have her spayed and was surprised when the Vet told me she already had a scar from a previous spaying.

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Feb. 5, 2010, 06:12 PM
I recently found a dog at the boarding barn- older, arthritic old lab, but clearly cared for. He was wearing a collar, but no tags. I called all the animal shelters in my county and surrounding counties, posted on craigslist, petfinder, etc, but no one called. Eventually, someone read the craigslist ad and friended me (somehow) on Facebook ranting and raving that I had "stolen" their dog. Turns out the dog lived on an adjoining property to the farm and had wandered over one day. He stuck around for 3 or 4 hours, so I assumed he didn't know where to go.

Owner came to get him from me the next day and explained to me that the children were so glad they'd found the dog. He told me a really long story about how the dog tends to wander and that someone always picks him up and they get reunited somehow. I really spent a long time scratching my head as to why this dog didn't have a tag or a microchip... some people amaze me.

Brookes
Feb. 5, 2010, 06:47 PM
citydog, the person who posted that was not concerned with the owner proving ownership but their worth. That is was peeved me off. I would also want a person to prove that the lost dog I found actually belonged to them. However I wouldn't insist that they prove that they deserve the dog back.

What if one of show dogs disappeared and was lost for 3 months. Was found and then the people that found her decided that I had to prove to them that I was deserving of my own property back? That is the jist of what was said. I would be at their house so fast with the sheriff they wouldn't know what hit them. You want to call animal control to meet me there, fine. Don't hold my animal hostage because you don't know the story of how that animal was loose to begin with. Assumptions can be very ugly and very expensive for all involved.

That is what I was having issues with.

Back to the OP; 3 weeks ago a friend and I picked up a purebred golden retriever and a purebred doxie. They were covered in mud, we grabbed them and threw them in the back seat of my car (ack!) took them back to her house and gave them water, checked them over for injury and immediately, IMMEDIATELY called animal control to see if anyone had reported them missing yet.

5 hours later we received a call from animal control that the owners had been found and could they please come get their dogs. They identified them to animal control and we agreed that yes those were the dogs. Turns out the son's friend came in through the gate and left it open. A simple screw up.

Now my friend had just lost her lab to old age. What if she had decided that this lovely golden was just what she was looking for??? Nope we did the ethical thing and did it immediately without making assumptions as to the reason that the dogs were loose on the road. A very happy ending for all. Had the dogs been in bad shape (they were not) we still would have done the same thing. Only insisting that animal control come and get them immediately as they obviously needed medical attention.

You have sat with this ill animal for how long now? Not ethical in the realm of dog care, not ethical in the realm of NOT YOUR DOG. For all you know that poor thing could require some type of daily medication, you not taking it to the vet or turning it over right away to animal control was not only unethical it was irresponsible.

My husband came home with a malamute years back, found him wandering the street. Called animal control. The dog was not only being looked for he was severely diabetic and needed immediate attention. He had slipped his collar and vamoosed. Thank goodness my husband did the ETHICAL thing and called, or we could have watched that lovely animal die in front of our eyes. The owner literally ran into our house and shoved a syringe into his dog. The poor man had tears running down his face thanking us for taking him in.

Think about that before you judge or assume why that purebred unspayed dog showed up at your house. I just don't see a whole lot of folks dumping young purebred dogs, at least not around here anyway. That little booger could have cost someone over $1000.

clairdelune
Feb. 5, 2010, 06:55 PM
My Dog has been missing now for 2 months and 5 days, so I know what the owners are going through (if of course they are trying to find the dog) Here are some things you could do as well as getting the dog checked out by a vet.
1.Call all vets in your area (first thing I did when Charlotte went missing)
2. take a photo with your cell phone and send to your contacts asking them to forward to their contacts.
3. Put a found ad on Petfinders.com.
4.Call the nearest Dachshund rescue, they are listed on Petfinders.
5. Get the dog to the vet, dog may be dehydrated, may need treatment for flee's ect.
6. put up flyers in supermarkets, bars, post office,cafe's ect.
Little dogs can escape through tiny holes in fences,his owners may not have internet access so flyers may be the only way they will know that the dog has been found.
Of course this poor little dog may have been a christmas gift and the children have lost interest or they couldnot house train the dog and do not care that the dog is missing.

All this is a lot of work for you but I can assure you if the owners are truly missing their dog you will be rewarded maybe not in cash but by knowing you helped them get their little dog home.

EponaRoan
Feb. 5, 2010, 06:59 PM
Remember the whippet that got lost after Westminster? They never found her. And there was a lot of publicity too. Now whether someone found her and kept her or she died and was never found or whatever - it's a mystery.

http://www.americanwhippetclub.net/awcpages/vivi.htm

My Two Cents
Feb. 5, 2010, 09:03 PM
Currently there is a dog missing in Iowa from a 40 car pile up on Interstate 35. The dogs family I believe is from Rochester Mn. There was a human fatality in that accident and the surviving family members would really like to get dog back. It dissappeared from the accident scene. The accident happened roughly 70 miles from the owners home. The owners neighbors and friends have been looking for days. It just goes to show how far a dog can be from home and that some circumstances could not be forseen. So not only do the people that are missing the dog need to be diligent in advertising and notifying the public, the people finding the dog need to be just as diligent in finding the dogs owners. I remember when I was about 10 my dog dissappeared. I looked and cryed for months. Never turned up. I can only imagine other owners hearts breaking when their furry friends are missing. If the owners really don't care it's one thing but if is someone out there looking for a lost dog that I found I try to make sure there is plenty of opportunity for them to be reunited.

Tivas_a_Diva
Feb. 5, 2010, 09:04 PM
My dog and one of my two cats are microchipped (working on getting the second kitty done). I can feel the microchip under the skin of my itty bitty kitty, but not on my dog. I called the vet to confirm if that was ok; they said sometimes you can feel it, sometimes you can (and of course it was ok if I did feel it).

I would be extremely heartbroken if one of my pets got lost and would be very grateful if someone had found them, that they contact the necessary people as soon as possible (vet, HomeAgain Company, etc). :)

jetsmom
Feb. 5, 2010, 09:55 PM
citydog, the person who posted that was not concerned with the owner proving ownership but their worth. That is was peeved me off. I would also want a person to prove that the lost dog I found actually belonged to them. However I wouldn't insist that they prove that they deserve the dog back.

What if one of show dogs disappeared and was lost for 3 months. Was found and then the people that found her decided that I had to prove to them that I was deserving of my own property back? That is the jist of what was said. I would be at their house so fast with the sheriff they wouldn't know what hit them. You want to call animal control to meet me there, fine. Don't hold my animal hostage because you don't know the story of how that animal was loose to begin with. Assumptions can be very ugly and very expensive for all involved.

That is what I was having issues with.




I think it was my post you didn't like.

I've found a lot of dogs, and advertise each as found in the newspaper, Petsmart Bulletin board, AC, Humane Society and the 3 rescue orgs in town, as well as flyers in the area found. I also check the lost ads in those places, as well as CL.
I take the dog to the vet w/in a day and get scanned for chip.
If someone calls within 3 days I tell them to bring me vet record/shot record to prove it is theirs. I usually will take the dog to the vet and get it's shots on the 3rd day, and schedule spay or neuter for the 7th day. I find homes for strays after 2 weeks, to give them time to recover from spay/neuter. I don't want to send an unaltered dog to a new home. And if it was loose, the owner obviously can't keep it contained to prevent unwanted litters.
If someone wants their dog back, they will need to pay for the shots/spay/neuter/microchip. If the dog had been vaccinated w/in the yr, I will eat the cost of that.
If the dog was in horrible condition, it will be taken directly to a vet, and checked out. If someone tries to claim it, they had better be able to tell me when it went missing and provide a vet reference, because if they were the ones to get the dog in that condition, they aren't getting it back. I'd be calling AC myself, to report abuse/neglect while they are there admitting it is their pet.
I have never had a problem reuniting a pet with it's owner and getting reimbursed for vet costs. The owners have been thrilled to have their dog found safe. I had one owner that didn't call me for 3 weeks in spite of all of my ads. When I asked her what she had done to find her pet (unneutered, no tags/no chip), she said she put a flier up at a mini-market ...ONE flyer. I told her what I had done to try to find it''s owner, and told her I gave the dog to someone who would actually give it a good home, and make a little effort to find iit if it went missing. She said "OK" and hung up. I didn't feel the least bit sorry for her.

JanM
Feb. 5, 2010, 10:54 PM
A friend had a cat show up at his home in the boonies, and they checked around but no one claimed the cat. A while later my friend took cat (who he called "free to" as in free to good home) to get spayed, and the vet called and said cat already had been spayed. He teased us he was changing the cat's name to "Already Been" for already been spayed.

Thomas_1
Feb. 5, 2010, 11:08 PM
You can't always feel a microchip at all.

Get the dog to the vets and have her scanned for a chip.

Get a notice up in the vet's surgery and at local dog wardens and police stations to say a dog has been found. If you're going to be really responsible, also get a small advert in the pets section of your local newspaper.

Personally speaking I think it's wrong of you not to have done all of that so far.

This could be someone's much loved pet that's been let out or escaped following a car accident or frightened off or something like that.

By all means look after the dog, that's great but be a little more active about trying to locate the owner.

If the owner doesn't turn up then you can keep the dog.

Over here there is actually a time limit. Don't know how it works there but you can't keep it just because you've grown fond of it!

pAin't_Misbehavin'
Feb. 5, 2010, 11:18 PM
Y'all leave halters on your horses? I never do, unless they're breakaways. You can get breakaway collars same as halters.

I've known a lot more dogs that have hanged themselves on a collar than horses that have done it with a halter.

But breakaway collars will do as it says on the tin and break. You need to chip or tattoo your dogs for ID purposes if you're using a breakaway collar.

As for jingly tags - I use boomerang tags. They're like a metal half-sleeve that fits over the collar. Working sheepdogs use them cause sheep don't like jangling tags.:)

Since the OP is sorry she asked, I won't burden her with any further advice.:lol: But I'm glad to read she's taking the dog to a vet, and hopefully the good doctor will do a health check while she's there for the scan.

Meredith Clark
Feb. 5, 2010, 11:46 PM
In the past when I've found dogs I do this (and I live in a town):

1) knock on a few doors where I found the door (unless i'm in a neighbor hood where I'm not comfortable knocking on doors..)

2) call a few vets and the SPCA to see if anyone has reported it

3) put an ad in the paper, it's free here. I put "found: dog on Whatever Stree".

I don't put a description anymore after a particular situation.. We found a puppy under our porch in a rain storm. We asked around and put an ad with a description. 3 months later (after we had already rehomed the pup) this women from a local trailer park started harassing us claiming it was her dog. Nothing about her story matched from the day it was found to the collar (it wasn't wearing...) she only knew the info we put in the ad (size, color, sex, etc).

After a few crazy messages my dad finally called the number back and her husband apologized and said that she's done this with 3 other dogs and that they never had a dog...

Good Luck!

headsupheelsdown
Feb. 6, 2010, 01:10 AM
Jingling tags: They can be silenced with those donut shaped colored rubber pieces you can buy to help you identify keys more easily on a keyring. Just go to any store that you can get a copy of a key made and you will see them near the key blanks. They will stretch to fit most shapes of tags. Kinda the same principle that people in the military use the rubber go-rounds to silence their dog tags.

As far as mini-doxies go.... man oh man, they can slip through the tiniest hole in a fenceline. A cousin-in-law in my family has one and it took a couple of weeks for them to locate everyplace that the dog was getting out of their yard and fix it. Maybe the dogs owners had moved recently and hadn't escaped-proofed their yard yet? Maybe the dog was new to them and they didn't yet realize how Those little buggers can squeeze through the tiniest of openings.

Either way... you need to go through all the proper motions to locate the dog's owner. It could be a kid's dog and they could be absolutely heartbroken. I don't really care that you are getting attached. Not your dog yet until you make some sort of good faith effort to locate the owner. Shame on you (and flaming explosive diarreah curse on you) if you don't.

citydog
Feb. 6, 2010, 02:15 AM
And if it was loose, the owner obviously can't keep it contained to prevent unwanted litters.

Often the case, but not always. Accidents happen. Had an acquaintance with a well-bred, much loved, multi-titled intact bitch. Her landlord came to make a repair to the kitchen sink and let the dog out (no fence) "because it wanted to go" and the left himself. She came home from work, and the dog had been gone for four hours already.

Some folks from out of state heading up to ski country had a rollover accident on the highway. The dog fled through the broken rear window. The humans were sent to the hospital. They couldn't exactly go looking for their dog right away, and when they did get out of the hospital, they had to try to find the dog from their home several states away.

Etc.

While lots of rotten, irresponsible owners allow their dogs to roam and don't neuter, it's not always the case.

Plus, a dog can lose condition *remarkably* quickly when it's lost and/or stressed. My dogs are lean and fit. When I was in an accident in October, my Terv bitch went to stay with dear friends who are experienced owners/trainers and whose lives revolve around their dogs. My girl lost five pounds the first week from stress despite an abundant, high quality diet, a warm house, etc. If she'd been lost along the highway she'd have been skeletal after a week. While I'd be overjoyed simply to get my dog back safely, and would reimburse for any necessary vet care, I'd be royally pissed if someone played judge and jury, decided I wasn't worthy of getting my friend/property back and refused to return my dog or essentially held it for ransom.

citydog
Feb. 6, 2010, 02:19 AM
Her Vet could have shaved the area and possibly didn't see a scar.

I had this happen to a stray I picked up once. Brought her to the Vet to have her spayed and was surprised when the Vet told me she already had a scar from a previous spaying.


Spay scars aren't always apparent, particularly if they were pediatric spays.

Huntertwo
Feb. 6, 2010, 11:54 AM
My dog and one of my two cats are microchipped (working on getting the second kitty done). I can feel the microchip under the skin of my itty bitty kitty, but not on my dog. I called the vet to confirm if that was ok; they said sometimes you can feel it, sometimes you can (and of course it was ok if I did feel it).

I would be extremely heartbroken if one of my pets got lost and would be very grateful if someone had found them, that they contact the necessary people as soon as possible (vet, HomeAgain Company, etc). :)

A bit off topic, but is there any link between the microchips and cancer?

BLBGP
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:01 PM
A bit off topic, but is there any link between the
microchips and cancer?

Only in lab mice predisposed to cancer.

There is no evidence to suggest that dogs, cats, rabbits or other domestic animals implanted with a microchip are at an increased risk of developing a tumor. According to Dr. Linda Lord at Ohio State University, “the mice used in the studies …. were genetically predisposed to cancer and do not represent the genetic diversity we see in our dogs and cats.” In addition, for the past 10 years the British Small Animal Veterinary Association has been collecting data to report any adverse effects related to implanted microchips. During this time, only two tumors were reported among the six million dogs in the registry.

BuddyRoo
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:01 PM
The microchips are encapsulated in a hypoallergenic capsule and do not give off any radio waves or anything that would cause cancer. Think of it as a piece of metal and the reader like a metal detector.

The microchips are about the size of a grain of rice and normally do not interfere. On some occasions (especially in obese pets) the chip can migrate. In other cases, sometimes scar tissue will form around the chip making it more noticeable to touch. Pretty rare though. They're not injected into the muscle, it's sub cutaneous.

BLBGP
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:01 PM
OP - was there a microchip?

RHdobes563
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:12 PM
Took her to the vet, she is not chipped.

Just a bump.

wendy
Feb. 6, 2010, 12:47 PM
I've known a lot more dogs that have hanged themselves on a collar than horses that have done it with a halter.

But breakaway collars will do as it says on the tin and break. You need to chip or tattoo your dogs for ID purposes if you're using a breakaway collar.


if you look at the number of dogs who get lost and never found and compare to the number of dogs hanging themselves on collars, I think you might decide visible ID at all times is safer. I think if you weigh the risks keeping a safety collar with an id on it on the dog at all times is much safer than not doing so. I also can't stand jingling tags, so I use riveted-on ID tags. Or you can get embroidered collars. No tags needed. I also don't use "breakaway" collars, I use hunting safety collars-they have a ring in the middle, so if the collar catches on something it can have "play" and release the dog without the dog losing the collar.
After having once spent several weeks helping someone (unsuccessfully) look for a beloved dog who slipped his collar and went off after a deer, never to be seen again, I also have a policy of microchip all dogs, and never attach the leash to the ID collar. If the dog "slips" the collar attached to the leash, at least he's still got ID.
Collarless in the house doesn't sound safe either- how many stories do you hear of dogs suddenly darting out the door and so forth?
but also assuming collarless= no owner is just not fair.

atlatl
Feb. 6, 2010, 01:37 PM
I once found a Weimaraner in the street with a chow around 8pm. I try to stop for loose dogs since I'd like someone to stop and try to help mine if they ever got out.

The chow wouldn't come near, but the weim was very happy to see me and even happier when I hoisted her fat self into the truck. My house was roughly 5 miles from where I found her. I kept her for a week, much to the consternation of the basenjis, since weim rescue was full and I didn't want her to go to the pound. No collar, as mentioned above very well fed, really bad teeth.

After the week, I was really attached to her, and she was overcoming her shyness which was probably exacerbated by our male basenji who is very bossy. I finally was able to hand her over to the weim rescue and they had to pry her away from me. There was a happy ending, she did have a chip and her elderly owners were thrilled to get Lilly back.

She had been gone several days when I picked her up and was already close to 15 miles from home and had somehow made it from the south side of the freeway to the north side alive.

dacasodivine
Feb. 6, 2010, 04:38 PM
Another thought. The dog could have been staying with someone in the area and escaped. I had my sister watch my dog when I was in the hospital having my first child. If my dog was easily stressed, he could have lost weight; and if he had somehow escaped, he might have been mistaken for a dumped dog.

Put up some flyers and call local vets and shelter with very basic information. "Found dauchaund" That's it. I did that once with a dog that wondered up to my house on Christmas day. Owners called not long after and came got their pet.

clairdelune
Feb. 6, 2010, 10:56 PM
OP if you found a lost child would you keep he/she and just presume that because the child was lost the parents did not want the child !!

My dog has been missing as I said in an earlier post to this thread for over 2 months, lasy month I travelled 1000 miles in a day in very bad weather because we thought we had found her.
Please call everywhere you can to find this dogs owner and if the owner never show's you have yourself a dog.

enjoytheride
Feb. 6, 2010, 11:48 PM
I think if I found a lost child that was starving and covered in bruises I would probably think twice about boldly looking for the parents and perhaps contact the police first.

JohnDeere
Feb. 6, 2010, 11:59 PM
I think if I found a lost child that was starving and covered in bruises I would probably think twice about boldly looking for the parents and perhaps contact the police first.

you would probbably take away 2 of my kids then.:lol: both looked starved (they arent air ferns :D) they east all the time and generally have bruises from playing some sport or other. I swear I havent beeten them in weeks! :winkgrin:

To the dog and OP I hope you find the owner if it wishes to be found. Otherwise enjoy your dog.

clairdelune
Feb. 7, 2010, 12:21 AM
I think if I found a lost child that was starving and covered in bruises I would probably think twice about boldly looking for the parents and perhaps contact the police first.
Yes, but you would contact somebody.
I should have given a better example than a child...If you found a purse with no ID in it you would not keep it you would take it to the police.
The Dog's owners could be heartbroken and searching for their little dog, you have been kind enough to take this dog in feed her and get her to the vet's. The next step is to try and find the owners ,a simple call to a local radio station could be all it takes to find them.
Dachshund's may have little legs but they can run fast:D

cssutton
Feb. 7, 2010, 12:41 AM
I wonder if it has ever occurred to all of the holier than thou more pure than Jesus posters on this thread that the OP may have never found a stray before and from lack of experience in that area, really had no idea how many ways there are to locate the owner?

Rather than the ruthless cut to shreds "what are you thinking", a few suggestions might be more helpful.

She might have a horse and might be knowledgeable about horses, but that does not help one work his way through the dog world.

My suggestion is that in addition to following the other suggestions, the OP should post a photo and description in every single local veterinarian clinic.

Almost every pet dog has been to the vet at sometime in his life and the veterinarian staff will remember a dog longer than the local pound will remember an inquiry for a lost dog.

CSSJR

slc2
Feb. 7, 2010, 11:16 AM
very few dogs are microchipped and lots of dogs are dumped off. it is not always possibele to find owner.

mustangtrailrider
Feb. 7, 2010, 11:19 AM
I live in an area where there aren't "lost" dogs. They are ferals or wild dogs. If I see a dog with a collar, I locate the owners. Some are local hunting dogs. Some live in the area and are returned home. Many dogs, if friendly enough, are taken immediately to the pound.

My dogs will KILL other dogs if given the chance. My dogs are not friendly with other dogs. I will not risk other dogs or mine.

I will not keep an unknown dog on my property and risk the health and safety of my other animals. I have no problem taking one to animal control. If someone has lost a dog, I do feel sorry for the dog. I feel sorry for the person.

I do truly admire all of the nice folks that would keep the dog until the owner is around. I am not able or willing to do that. I have 4 dogs, 3 indoor and 3 outdoor cats, guineas, chickens, and horses. I do not want other animals around that do not belong here!

If an animal is overly nice and small, I will try to find its people and will go to great lengths to do so.

I am just not able to help all lost animals. Sorry, but that is reality. There are a lot in my area. Most are strays and wild. They do not belong to anyone.

You can usually tell the ones that are lost, dumped, live in the area, or wild. It is usually easy to do so. Many are abandoned hunting dogs that got lost and the hunters don't care...

It is sad, but it is what it is!

shea'smom
Feb. 7, 2010, 11:43 AM
I have rescued many strays/lost dogs. I will call vets, check for microchip and check all the lost dogs sites, papers etc.
I will NOT put an ad out anywhere if the dog is not neutered, looks bad, etc.
I think if someone wants their dog back they can put the effort out to find it. Otherwise I will keep or place it.
In 30 years I have found the owner twice.
Once I called animal control and the owner had already called and came and got the dog.
Once, some busy body took it upon themselves to put a sign out where I had picked up an 8 week old puppy in the road. Owners called, I returned puppy. Her name was Cellar, because that is where they kept her :(.
I went back the next day and they gave her to me. They would not have made an effort to get her back if they hadn't seen the sign.
So, OP, if nobody can be bothered to loook for the dog so you can return it, keep it if you want.
Nobody claimed the clipped Shittzu with no teeth and a tatoo in her ear found in FEb. on the road, the two 4 week old puppies in a ditch, the two starving dogs that went into a grocery store loooking for food, the emaciated growling puppy in the highway median, the puppy in the middle of nowhere with no water, dumped on a back road in summer, the pregnant beagle on a busy bridge in the pouring rain.
You get a feel for the rescues as opposed to the lost ones.
I don't look for bad homes to return dogs to.

eventermomoh
Feb. 7, 2010, 01:37 PM
I'd contact my local and surrounding shelters and have the dog scanned for a chip, if no owner, I'd consider him mine and feel like I at least tried. If I was able to reunite a rightful owner, I'd be happy I was able to help. And if I had grown used to the idea of another dog in my life, I would go adopt one and feel even better for helping 2 dogs. GL!

stella3
Feb. 7, 2010, 02:57 PM
I have been following this thread for a few days now.
This morning I got an email from a neighbor whose dog was gone when they got home last night. The dog was in the house! Nothing in the house was missing or disturbed and they could only figure that the back door which doesn't always shut tight blew open and then blew closed again. Dog is 14yr old border collie that lives on epilepsy meds. Luckily another nieghbor of ours found the dog this morning while walking his dog.

It made me realize how easily a very loved dog could get lost.

Microchips are great. However, unless a person goes into a vet's office and says they found the dog as a stray, chances are the dog won't ever get scanned to see if in fact it was someone else's dog. They could pass the dog off as something they bought out of the newspaper. Dogs DO get stolen, too. Is there a protocol at vet's for this? I make mine scan my dog's every year to make sure it's working. But I have to ASK.

My dog has 6 tags on his collar. 3 different ID with name address phone numbers (in case 1-2 falls off, maybe overkill:yes:) then his microchip tag, his town license and his rabies cert. I would take his collar off in the house because the clanging would annoy me, and i hate the way it makes his fur grow. NEVER AGAIN! He is living in his collar from now on, and I went to Petsmart this morning to get the tag silencers.

I think it is wrong to assume that because a dog is skinny and has no collar that it isn't a loved pet. As others have said, it could have been missing long. In fact we had another dog in our neighborhood who jumped out a window on 4th of july (hated the fireworks) and was so spooked he wouldn't let anyone near him. He was wandering around for almost 2 months before he was finally able to be caught. Owner was leaving food out for him, but usually only saw racoons eating it. This man LOVED his dog. he was wearing a collar, but didn't do any good since he was so skittish.

I am glad this post is on here. Made me realize how quickly my baby could be gone. Even so, with all the precautions I have taken I would have to rely on someone else to do the "right thing" to get the dog back to me. :(

marta
Feb. 7, 2010, 09:26 PM
man, i can only imagine what hostile crap you've received in PM's to prompt this update, on the other hand, i'm not really surprised, i've been on the receiving end of the COTH wrath and it ain't pretty :(


i have no doubt that your assessment of the situation is correct and that you've taken steps necessary to ensure that if someone is looking for it, they can find it.

kudos to you for taking care of the little thing.

ESG
Feb. 8, 2010, 10:47 AM
Her Vet could have shaved the area and possibly didn't see a scar.

I had this happen to a stray I picked up once. Brought her to the Vet to have her spayed and was surprised when the Vet told me she already had a scar from a previous spaying.

Quite true. I once had a vet tell me our newly acquired stray had been spayed. That was six weeks before she presented us with five puppies. :rolleyes:

moonriverfarm
Feb. 8, 2010, 12:22 PM
shea'smom you hit the nail on the head. I was part of a COTH convoy that brought a starved chihuahua cross country to a new home. He was found wandering in a ratty sweater and nothing but mite infested skin and bones. After the wonderful people brought him here they noticed signs on telephone posts for a lost chihuahua. Too late. Any owner who would starve and allow a "pet" to get in the state this dog was in are not worthy. Since we got him here and to the vet we found he has heartworms and erlichia...google how THAT disease is caught. So I agree, a found dog in a state of starvation and illness does not need to go back from whence it came.
Hoping for an update on the OPs dog.
PS - a friend who works at the local Starbucks sent me a message this morning - for the SECOND TIME in 3 months someone has left a puppy in the bathroom there. She adopted this one and the manager adopted the last one. I guess there are worse ways to get rid of a puppy, but WTF?????????

trubandloki
Feb. 8, 2010, 12:41 PM
erlichia...google how THAT disease is caught.

Ticks.... Is that supposed to mean something? Ticks are a problem for even well kept animals.

wendy
Feb. 8, 2010, 12:46 PM
So I agree, a found dog in a state of starvation and illness does not need to go back from whence it came.

how exactly do you determine the dog's state was caused by the owner, and not by the situation of being lost/stolen? I can imagine some very glaring situations where it might be obvious, but say, my friend's dog. Slipped his collar in wilderness area and went after a deer. Probably ran for miles. We never found him, but after wandering around in the woods for a couple of weeks starving and getting covered with ticks, burrs, and mud, and picking up parasites, and possibly injuring himself, he could have been found several hundred miles away from any "lost" posters by someone who thought he was an escaped abuse case, rather than a pampered lost pet with a heart-broken owner.

sycamoreshowmom
Feb. 8, 2010, 12:54 PM
how exactly do you determine the dog's state was caused by the owner, and not by the situation of being lost/stolen? I can imagine some very glaring situations where it might be obvious, but say, my friend's dog. Slipped his collar in wilderness area and went after a deer. Probably ran for miles. We never found him, but after wandering around in the woods for a couple of weeks starving and getting covered with ticks, burrs, and mud, and picking up parasites, and possibly injuring himself, he could have been found several hundred miles away from any "lost" posters by someone who thought he was an escaped abuse case, rather than a pampered lost pet with a heart-broken owner.

I agree. You do not know unless you find the owner. I suppose if you want to keep the dog instead of looking for the owner this is a handy dandy excuse to use.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 8, 2010, 01:12 PM
In the case of the chihuahua, suffice it to say the dog had been "lost" for three days, and has other issues that point to negligence and abuse. Like fractures. Oh and the other disease, leptospirosis. This was a clear case of a neglected and mistreated dog.
I do not in any way advocate hoarding a found dog because you think it is cute. I am merely saying some dogs are better off not going back to where they were lost from. Like the strays I foster for our local HS. One totally starved rottie mom whose puppies were bagged and thrown over an overpass. We brought her in and had her for 6 weeks before somebody called and said "that's Bernie's ole dawg". Bernie did not live her enough to pay her vet bills which by that time were several hundred dollars. We would not have sent her back if he had. Sorry if that makes me a bad person. I see abuse every day and it really hardens my heart towards certain owners. We'd remove a kid who was neglected; why not do the same for an animal?

ToTheNines
Feb. 8, 2010, 01:20 PM
"he could have been found several hundred miles away from any "lost" posters by someone who thought he was an escaped abuse case, rather than a pampered lost pet with a heart-broken owner"

So what is the above person suggesting? Other than on-line resources, which are a great first line resource, that the FINDER NOT THE OWNER is supposed to cover a 300 mile radius with flyers and phone calls? For an owner that could not be bothered to chip the dog or provide it with a properly adjusted ID collar? For every dog that is found regardless of its condition?

IMO, a dog is more likely to get back to an owner who is making an effort. Reading on-line lost and founds has been extremely stressful for me. So many sad owners. So many found dogs who may or may not actually have owners who care. So many ads for placements from the rescues. And the story of the person who lost their GP breaks my heart. She is making an effort like no other. One person replied to my "found" ad still looking for a dog lost a year ago.

I am going to start a list of the more ridiculous responses. Like the people who cannot be bothered to keep an ID collar on because it musses the dog's hair or jangles a bit. Or to spend a few bucks chipping them. And then become hostile if finders do not bend over backwards, catching, exposing their own dogs, vetting, searching on-line, posting ads and fielding nutty responses, making futile calls and posting flyers for every collarless unchipped dog they find regardless of the dog's condition.

I am sorry for those who have lost their dogs. It is sounding like most of them have not been chipped or ID collared. It is sad that there are escapes and accidents with even careful owners. But the problem is overpopulation of dogs and too many unwanted ones.

To keep this on topic for Around the Farm, it is us farm owners who see so many lost/dumped dogs. Please please help us finders by collaring and/or chipping them, hopefully both. I just googled "breakaway dog collar" and there are many on the market.

trubandloki
Feb. 8, 2010, 02:22 PM
Like the people who cannot be bothered to keep an ID collar on because it musses the dog's hair or jangles a bit.

Sigh.

Do you keep a nylon halter on your horse at all times?
I am guessing no.

When you have met someone whose dog managed to strangle itself to death in its cage during the day then you will understand the desire to not leave collars on dogs inside the house.

And I guess a nasty yeasty rash is an OK thing to you? Or wait, you would find my dog with a collar on and a rash and you would say I am not a fit owner because of the rash, right?

Believe it or not, there have been studies on the jingling tags thing. And I think the riveted tag gives information, no? And again, all my dogs are chipped, as are my horses (who do not wear halters).

I do have to agree that a person who looses a dog does need to contact every place they can think of an report the dog lost. But that does no good if the person who finds it sits and home and does nothing because they like the dog they found.

trubandloki
Feb. 8, 2010, 02:45 PM
nm

Mara
Feb. 8, 2010, 03:10 PM
Sigh.

Do you keep a nylon halter on your horse at all times?
I am guessing no.

When you have met someone whose dog managed to strangle itself to death in its cage during the day then you will understand the desire to not leave collars on dogs inside the house.

And I guess a nasty yeasty rash is an OK thing to you? Or wait, you would find my dog with a collar on and a rash and you would say I am not a fit owner because of the rash, right?

Believe it or not, there have been studies on the jingling tags thing. And I think the riveted tag gives information, no? And again, all my dogs are chipped, as are my horses (who do not wear halters).

I do have to agree that a person who looses a dog does need to contact every place they can think of an report the dog lost. But that does no good if the person who finds it sits and home and does nothing because they like the dog they found.


I do not leave collars on my 2 during the day. They are out because they can be trusted to behave in the house, but they are young and play hard. After observing one dog getting his lower jaw caught in the other dog's collar, that was the "lightbulb moment". I do not want to come home and find one dog garrotted and the other with a dislocated jaw. I think I'd pretty much just lose it at that point - call the mental ward.

GallopHer
Feb. 8, 2010, 04:03 PM
Not only do I have my dogs microchipped, but they wear TWO ID tags. Just in case one tags falls off or the "finder" does not take the dog to be screened for chips, I want to make it easy to contact me. Paranoid??? Me???

kmw2707
Feb. 8, 2010, 05:05 PM
I do not leave collars on my 2 during the day. They are out because they can be trusted to behave in the house, but they are young and play hard. After observing one dog getting his lower jaw caught in the other dog's collar, that was the "lightbulb moment". I do not want to come home and find one dog garrotted and the other with a dislocated jaw. I think I'd pretty much just lose it at that point - call the mental ward.


I have had this happen. I have two yearling labs. Brother and Sister. They play hard and the male got his lower jaw through his sister's collar. She fought back and flipped him, so now the collar is twisted around his lower jaw and choking her. It was very scary and thankfully my DH was home and heard me screaming. The both ended up ok, but no more collars. (They are chipped, however).

Huntertwo
Feb. 8, 2010, 05:25 PM
Quite true. I once had a vet tell me our newly acquired stray had been spayed. That was six weeks before she presented us with five puppies. :rolleyes:

LOL... I guess I was lucky then...

Huntertwo
Feb. 8, 2010, 05:31 PM
"he could have been found several hundred miles away from any "lost" posters by someone who thought he was an escaped abuse case, rather than a pampered lost pet with a heart-broken owner"

So what is the above person suggesting? Other than on-line resources, which are a great first line resource, that the FINDER NOT THE OWNER is supposed to cover a 300 mile radius with flyers and phone calls? For an owner that could not be bothered to chip the dog or provide it with a properly adjusted ID collar? For every dog that is found regardless of its condition?

IMO, a dog is more likely to get back to an owner who is making an effort. Reading on-line lost and founds has been extremely stressful for me. So many sad owners. So many found dogs who may or may not actually have owners who care. So many ads for placements from the rescues. And the story of the person who lost their GP breaks my heart. She is making an effort like no other. One person replied to my "found" ad still looking for a dog lost a year ago.

I am going to start a list of the more ridiculous responses. Like the people who cannot be bothered to keep an ID collar on because it musses the dog's hair or jangles a bit. Or to spend a few bucks chipping them. And then become hostile if finders do not bend over backwards, catching, exposing their own dogs, vetting, searching on-line, posting ads and fielding nutty responses, making futile calls and posting flyers for every collarless unchipped dog they find regardless of the dog's condition.

I am sorry for those who have lost their dogs. It is sounding like most of them have not been chipped or ID collared. It is sad that there are escapes and accidents with even careful owners. But the problem is overpopulation of dogs and too many unwanted ones.

To keep this on topic for Around the Farm, it is us farm owners who see so many lost/dumped dogs. Please please help us finders by collaring and/or chipping them, hopefully both. I just googled "breakaway dog collar" and there are many on the market.

Agree!

mickeydoodle
Feb. 8, 2010, 06:23 PM
so it is now bad/abusive to put tags on a dog's collar?????????:eek:

moonriverfarm
Feb. 8, 2010, 06:27 PM
Bottom line: with or without collar or chip, if I lost one of my dogs i would go thru hell and high water to get the word out, call every establishment that had anything to do with dogs, go door to door, put out flyers, post it in craigslist, in local papers, you name it. I would NOT expect the finder to go to such lengths. It would be MY RESPONSIBLITY.

shea'smom
Feb. 8, 2010, 07:04 PM
I agree with MoonRiver. And as the the finder (?) my responsiblity is to check for a chip and look for the lost ads.
I too had two siblings get caught in the collars and even with me right there, the strangled one stopped breathing and another dog bit the one whose jaw was caught because he thought he was attacking his sister. Thanks to a level headed 12 year old with a knife, both dogs were ok. Talk about scarey!
So, what is new dogs name?

Brookes
Feb. 8, 2010, 08:16 PM
What I can't understand is if you found a starving beaten sick chihauhua why didn't you call animal control? You could have handed them the 3 day old lost notice along with the obviously abused animal. I can imagine that animal control would have a not so nice chat with the owners of that dog.

Instead the owners probably just went out and got themselves another animal to torture. Had animal control intervened they could have charged them with animal abuse and kept them from owning future animals. For all you know there were other animals at that home that needed help too.

Animal control would not hand them back an animal in that type of condition. They are trained (at least here in our area) to make sure that animals are not returned to abusive homes. I can't imagine them saying, 'sure here's your dog back, see ya!'.

You may have helped one dog, but you missed the opportunity to help future pets or current pets those folks might own. Tough being a hero isn't it?

vacation1
Feb. 8, 2010, 10:56 PM
I am merely saying some dogs are better off not going back to where they were lost from... We'd remove a kid who was neglected; why not do the same for an animal?

Well, there are legal systems in place for dealing with neglected kids and neglected animals. They don't always work, but that doesn't mean it's okay to kidnap neglected toddlers and give them away to infertile couples who would shower them with love. If your local system sucks, the appropriate thing to do is work to change it. Personally, I am not involved in either rescue or local politics because I lack the gene that says "I can change that!" but I recognize the value in making those with the power of life and death over others have to answer for their decision. It is not a good idea to have individuals answerable to no one but their own conscience deciding that an animal is better off away from its owner.

ToTheNines
Feb. 8, 2010, 11:28 PM
Well this latest exchange is going on my ridiculous list. Everyone seems to agree that a finder will not be able to tell a neglected dog from one that has been lost a while. Now I am hearing that I should send this dog to animal control. First, there is no animal control in the county where it was found. Second, the animal control in nearby counties is to a crowded filthy kill pound. They get 3 days -- that's 72 hours. Is this really what you owners want? I have thought about what I would want for my dog if it got lost. He is chipped and collared. I would turn the world upside down looking for him. But if I could not find him, I could only comfort myself by thinking no, he was not harmed, no he was not run over, no he did not fall between the cracks at some pound, but yes, he has found another person to snuggle up with.

mustangtrailrider
Feb. 8, 2010, 11:35 PM
After this amount of time, I would consider the dog yours. Enjoy your new snuggle bug! My two doxies are curled up beside me....now and every night!

Meredith Clark
Feb. 8, 2010, 11:41 PM
Why is it so hard to collar a dog???

I got Bella a thin leather collar from Pet Smart or Pet Co and went to my local tack shop and got a brass halter plate with her name and my contact info. They put it on just like a halter plate and it doesn't jingle or anything

As far as choking.. she's broken hers off before so it's safe
(and yes she's chipped in case she would get lost and it broke off)

MistyBlue
Feb. 9, 2010, 12:01 AM
Count me in with the crowd stating that if I find a lost/stray dog...I contact local vets and shelters, scan for a chip with my own vet during a wellness exam and check for online ads and local flyers. That's it.
Going nationwide and contacting Nancy Grace just ain't going to happen. If the owners cared that much, the dog would have a $30 chip...a collar...or there'd be flyers and ads all over the place for the dog.

And FWIW, my dog wears his collar 24/7 except for a bath. He hates being without it, if I take it off he's nervous unless I let him hold it in his mouth during his bath.
Okay, so my dog is weird.

mustangtrailrider
Feb. 9, 2010, 12:03 AM
I have had my dogs lose collars and tags. I do not have collars on any of my dogs but my male doxie. I expect him to get out of his collar if needed.

I live in an area, that if my dogs got lost, they may never come home. Coyotes are a huge problem! Packs of wild dogs as well. The chances of finding my dogs are rare. One is old. Two are very small, think owl or hawk bait. The other is a pit bull. She would be shot on sight by most.

I will go to great lengths to get my dogs back, but I would have to accept the fact that they are gone. I will contact the usual routes, but in all reality, I don't think my guys would or could be found.

We are very rural. More trees and squirrels than people.

My dogs have never gotten lost. They know the territory very well as we go on long hikes. They are always with us outside or they are inside.

We do love our dogs!

shea'smom
Feb. 9, 2010, 09:16 AM
Mistyblue, that is so funny! I guess his collar is like his blankie.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 9, 2010, 10:39 AM
I did not find the chihuahua. I am 400 miles from where he was picked up. i merely offered a home for him and the vet care he so desperately needed. you can go on and on about how it "should" have been handled, but the bottom line is that he is getting the care he desperately needs and he would most definitely be dead now had he not gotten "lost". IMO, an owner who cannot care for his /her pets does not deserve them, whether they "love" them or not.
As for the dog in the OP, well, suffice it to say all is well in its world.

Horsegal984
Feb. 9, 2010, 10:43 AM
Just a note on microchipping. Check the laws in your area, but for many states the only legal proof of ownership is a registered microchip. Which does mean that legally even if the owners of this lost doxie did show up, they have no way legal way to prove it is their dog. Not saying that it shouldn't be retuned because it didn't have a chip, but in court? Not their dog.

Also, microchips are permanent and easier to track than tattoos, as microchips are entered into a nationwide database and can be read by the scanners carried by animal control and almost every vet now. In some areas animal control even has the scanners on the truck, so if a dog is ever picked up near the home they may not even have to go down to the shelter before being returned.

As far as having collars on your dogs or not it's a personal choice. Mine both have collars with tags that they wear whenever they leave the yard, but they don't wear them most of the time. My female got her toe hooked through the ring of the male's collar and that started a fight that broke her tooth and he needed stitches above his eye. Most people who have med-long haired dogs and show conformation classes won't have collars on their dogs because it krinks the coat around the neck. However in almost every case they will be microchipped.

Katherine
Vet Tech

SonnysMom
Feb. 9, 2010, 02:05 PM
When I have recently found a stray dog I take to French Creek Vet to scan for microchip. (FC Vet isn't my vet but they are the closest and are nice enough to use their Universal Scanner wand thing to check)

If no microchip I check with 4 places:
1. the local Petsmart lost/found board
2. the local discount pet store- they have an extensive lost/found book
3. Chester County SPCA
4. Montgomery County SPCA

I check with both SPCA's since I am close to the line.
Both SPCA's do not require me to bring them the dog. They look at their list to see if the dog has been reported. They take my name/phone number and will give it to anybody with a missing dog that vaguely matches description. After 3 days the dog is mine to do as I want.
3 days is what they are required to hold the dog before being able to adopt out. As long as I report the dog to the SPCA I am holding up my end of the bargin.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 9, 2010, 04:52 PM
I agree that is it the burden of the owner who lost the dog to exhaust every option. To me the finder's responsibility is to alert whatever appropriate organization is near their area. If someone loves their dog they WILL go to great lengths to find it if at all possible. Common sense will tell them to contact the HS or ASPCA in the area as well as their vet, and flyers are cheap and easy to make.

Casey09
Feb. 9, 2010, 10:23 PM
I have to say . . .
I do understand some of the "collar debate." I know someone who came home to find his dog strangled by his collar in his fenced yard. Collars can be dangerous.
However, I know that a lot of people do not actually want to find and keep your dog (or mine). I have to admit that when I see a dog roaming without a collar and prepare to try to catch him (I am, after all, a dog lover), a part of me groans. I have dogs, and they are not all that elated when I bring different dogs home. It is a lot of extra trouble. As a finder, the best thing that I can see is a telephone number so that I can call someone, who will come and collect the dog. I think that a lot of people are like that: they have dogs, or they don't want or can't have a dog. They don't want to pick up a dog and drive it down to a city shelter or keep it for weeks. They want to call someone who will pick up the dog. Many are probably hoping for a reward (and I would happily hand one over to anyone who would help one of my big, imposing looking - but much loved - dogs find his or her way back home).
I would urge anyone concerned about strangulation (and we all should be, I agree) to check into breakaway collars. They have two little attachments, so you can hook the leash up to both and it won't break away when you are walking the dog, if you choose to use that collar to walk with. If you are concerned about tag noise, check out tag silencers or those little "Quiet Tag" pouches. Get your dog's name and phone number embroidered on the collar. Get a collar that you can put a little plate on. Boomerang tags has things that slide over a collar. There are a lot of products out there that can help us overcome the problems with pet id, but I would urge anyone to put id on their dog.
All of that said, I do take my dogs collars off when I put them in a crate in my house. They are microchipped, and let's face it: the possibilities for escape are low. Otherwise, though, they have id.

hb
Feb. 9, 2010, 11:00 PM
Count me in with the crowd stating that if I find a lost/stray dog...I contact local vets and shelters, scan for a chip with my own vet during a wellness exam and check for online ads and local flyers. That's it.
Going nationwide and contacting Nancy Grace just ain't going to happen. If the owners cared that much, the dog would have a $30 chip...a collar...or there'd be flyers and ads all over the place for the dog.

And FWIW, my dog wears his collar 24/7 except for a bath. He hates being without it, if I take it off he's nervous unless I let him hold it in his mouth during his bath.
Okay, so my dog is weird.


Absolutely agree. Keep the dog OP. PM me if you want to hear a story about found-dog thievery.

MistyBlue, I've known a few dogs that act different without their collars on. One of mine acts insecure, but not as bad as yours. My sister's old dog would be just down right NAUGHTY if he was nekkid. Obeyed beautifully with the collar on, take it off and he'd just do whatever he pleased, run off, chew stuff, nip. It was hilarious.

Maybe he's afraid if he doesn't have his collar then he isn't your dog anymore? I swear they know the collar is a sign of belonging to us.

lolalola
Feb. 10, 2010, 09:03 PM
My elderly poodle ran off in Oct - something she had never done before. She had a collar on with my info. I put up posters, had her listed on the town's website, called shelters and my friend who is an ACO helped me look for her. She was gone about 36 hours, and found 5 miles away, coincidentally by an old friend I hadn't seen in years. In that 36 hours, she became covered with ticks, stickers, etc., and generally looked like she had been missing for quite some time. It doesn't take long for a dog, especially a pampered one, to go downhill.

Elmstead
Feb. 10, 2010, 09:57 PM
Count me in with the crowd stating that if I find a lost/stray dog...I contact local vets and shelters, scan for a chip with my own vet during a wellness exam and check for online ads and local flyers. That's it.
Going nationwide and contacting Nancy Grace just ain't going to happen. If the owners cared that much, the dog would have a $30 chip...a collar...or there'd be flyers and ads all over the place for the dog.

And FWIW, my dog wears his collar 24/7 except for a bath. He hates being without it, if I take it off he's nervous unless I let him hold it in his mouth during his bath.
Okay, so my dog is weird.


This post is right on! A truly concerned owner would have spent the time and money on a collar and/or a micro-chip. These days the chips are just so easy and relatively affordable to get at your annual vet appointment. If someone can't afford to properly ID their dog, then they probably shouldn't own one at all. And I believe that a truly concerned owner would have immediately posted flyers and alerted all of the local area pet stores, vets, and shelters.

P.S. My dog also gets a little neurotic when I remove his collar. :-) My husband says it's because he's "special". I, of course, think he is just especially smart!

LaBonnieBon
Feb. 10, 2010, 10:07 PM
I think you have done your part.... and now I would say it is totally fair for you to go with your gut.

I'd go ahead and send those microchip papers in and call yourself the new owner!!

Congrats!

shea'smom
Feb. 10, 2010, 11:37 PM
LabonnieBon,
"They call it PMS because Mad Cow Disease was already taken..."
This will be my new tee shirt!

MistyBlue
Feb. 11, 2010, 10:25 AM
Maybe he's afraid if he doesn't have his collar then he isn't your dog anymore?

Could be, but I'm leaning more towards the "he's speshul" reason. :winkgrin:
I think he thinks it's a piece of him and I've removed a piece of him.
He acts the same way when I groom him and remove shedding hair. Being a GSD he loses his base coat in clumps, so I use a shedding comb to get it out or just use my hands and pluck him like a chicken. It's all loose hair, no pulling needed. And yet as I dehair the dog...he gets more and more worried acting. And when I'm done and there's a pile of undercoat clumps, he gently picks up the entire pile very slowly and walks away with it, finds an out of the way spot and lays down holding his hair in his mouth. Whilst giving me pained looks..."You TOOK this from me and it's part of me!" :lol: :rolleyes: So I have to stuff the removed hair into a bag as I remove it so he doesn't carry it around with him for an entire day...redistributing it all over the house again.
Yeah...speshul ain't he? :winkgrin:

LaBonnieBon
Feb. 11, 2010, 10:53 AM
LabonnieBon,
"They call it PMS because Mad Cow Disease was already taken..."
This will be my new tee shirt!

:winkgrin:

katarine
Feb. 11, 2010, 12:05 PM
Misty, your dog reminds me of my Noodle Dog. Under stress, she flops like an overcooked egg noodle. Grooming is a huge stressor for her. She likes to go the the groomer, she's happy about being there- but that whole you are taking me off of me, really trips her trigger.

99.9% of the found dogs at my house get taken to the county Humane Society with a few days at most. I am not set up to accommodate strange dogs hanging around and possibly eating a cat or chasing a horse. We deal with this 4-6 times a year.

Those who LOSE their dogs have to make SOME effort to find their lost dogs. One obese pr of dogs I found were obviously someone's dogs. I posted fliers, I called around to vets and shelters. Nothing. One month later I took the female to the shelter, as she was too dumb to keep. The male, we liked and planned to keep. A few days pass-and the owner's drove by and recognized the male. Folks, they don't live 3 miles from me through the woods. The dogs got out of their fenced yard when some workers left the gate open. They didn't do jack SQUAT to find those dogs. He took the male back and who knows about the female...well, we told him where to look. Dingdongs.

My2cents
Feb. 11, 2010, 01:11 PM
And FWIW, my dog wears his collar 24/7 except for a bath. He hates being without it, if I take it off he's nervous unless I let him hold it in his mouth during his bath.
Okay, so my dog is weird.

My rescue dog from Sunkissed Acres is VERY happy to wear his collar and tags. When I took it off to put on his new dog license tag, he got soo anxious that I had to keep letting him smell the collar. I'm pretty sure he knows he's 'someone' if he has his collar and tags on.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 12, 2010, 01:44 PM
Last summer three jack russels appeared at my gate. One VERY fat - so fat his collar was nearly choking him (obviously no one had noticed). One normal and the third a female SO eaten up with mange she was red and nearly hairless. And in heat. No ID on the collar (the collar that was so tight you could not get a finger under it). Ours is a foster based rescue so I coordinated with the HS and got a foster. Checked with all my neighbors (verrrry rural area) and nobody knew anything ab the dogs. They ended up being adopted and treated like they deserved.....but about a month later one of the shack-dwellers down the road saw me at the mailbox and said he'd "lost" his jack russels and had I seen them...I said "oh, the one with the CHOKE collar and the other with horrible mange? They went to the HS. Call them."
Come on people. Would you REALLY advocate the dogs going back to that owner?

Huntertwo
Feb. 12, 2010, 03:09 PM
What I can't understand is if you found a starving beaten sick chihauhua why didn't you call animal control? You could have handed them the 3 day old lost notice along with the obviously abused animal. I can imagine that animal control would have a not so nice chat with the owners of that dog.

Instead the owners probably just went out and got themselves another animal to torture. Had animal control intervened they could have charged them with animal abuse and kept them from owning future animals. For all you know there were other animals at that home that needed help too.

Animal control would not hand them back an animal in that type of condition. They are trained (at least here in our area) to make sure that animals are not returned to abusive homes. I can't imagine them saying, 'sure here's your dog back, see ya!'.



Sadly, sometimes those animals ARE handed back to the owners..:no:

Have you ever watched "Animal Cops" where only the worst animals are seized and the others are left with the owners?

I worked for a Vet many years ago. The Dog Warden brought in two obviously starved dogs - horrible condition. Ribs, hips sticking out..sickening. These were confiscated, not strays.

They had to be fed many times a day, but only a small amount each time.

These poor dogs could not devourer(sp) the food fast enough. It was heart wrenching to watch.

Guess what??? Soon as the dogs were fattened up, they were returned to the owner!!!! :mad::mad::mad: WHY????

Dog Warden said he would periodically check in on the dogs..unreal.

I do see what you are saying though... sadly, it just doesn't always work that way.

moonriverfarm
Feb. 15, 2010, 12:35 PM
Ownership, like marriage and parenthood, is MORE than what is written on a piece of paper. Sometimes you just have to let common decency prevail and do what is best for the animal. If you can live with the decision you make, and it is in the best interest of the dog/cat/horse, I think that IS the right thing.

Blueskidoo
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:47 AM
I just wanted to add, that both of our dogs are chipped. and instead of my name, or their name on the tag, they say REWARD followed by our contact info. We hope that will result in a call before someone figures out they are the best doggies in the world :)

wendy
Feb. 17, 2010, 11:56 AM
say REWARD followed by our contact info. We hope that will result in a call before someone figures out they are the best doggies in the world

other folks recommend NEVER putting the dogs name on the tags/collar, and putting something like "Dog is very ill and requires expensive daily medication CALL ...." so people don't feel tempted to steal your dogs just cause they "found" them and think they might be better off not being returned.

Corky
Feb. 20, 2010, 01:51 PM
I have not read all the posts here, but thought you might get a laugh from my good sumaritan story.

I was living about 10 miles out of town in a rural area with a lot of hiking trails. It was a very common dumping ground for unwanted animals, and my roomate and I had just been talking about how the local paper had run an article on how many animals get dumped in this area, who to call if you find a stray, and how fall was prime dumping season as we are in a cottage area and often people don't want to take Fido or Fluffy home to the city.

So I am driving and see a cat. It looks in pretty good shape, but clearly hanging around the road. Usually I would have driven on, but something tugged at me. So I stopped and called out to it, and it meowed back to me. So I go looking in the bushes for it. Sure enough, it hasn't taken off. Looks pretty good, friendly type, so I was wondering if it had been dropped that day and hadn't been jaded by life in the wild yet. It was easy to catch, so I thought I'd better not let it go, because if I saw it again in a few days and couldn't catch it then, I would never forgive myself. So off I go home, only around the corner luckily, with cat in the car, and not wanting him to interact with my cats, put him in an unfinished room in the basement. I had to get to work, so I gave him a simple litter pan, some dry food and water, and left. On the way to work I called my roomate and explained the situation, and why there was a cat in the basement. She asks what it looks like, and as I am telling her, she starts laughing her head off. Sure enough, I picked up the neighbour's cat Donkey. She had been over there a few times, enough to know what the cat looked like, that it was friendly, and that he let it outside all the time. So later that night he comes to pick up Donkey, and I am just mortified. But it was a great running joke for a while, I got labelled Cat Thief, but it was worth it. Just shows that sometimes you think you're saving a cat, sometimes you're stealing the neighbour's pet. Oh well.