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View Full Version : Introducing new dog....kenneled at AC since 12/30/09



pcwertb
Jan. 28, 2010, 02:57 PM
Any insightful suggestions on how to transition this dog? I am listed as the point of last resource for german shorthair pointers at my local AC. This guy is 2, not neutered (will be when I pick him up) and heartworm positive. I think I'm insane, but I just couldn't leave him there.

Tried to visit with him today and my other gsp's (I have 2 at home) are all into people. He was only interested in the other dogs, basically ignored me. This breed is typically very into people, not aloof with them. I wonder if this behavior is from almost 30 days in the kennel, or how he was raised.

He was owner surrendered because they didn't want to pay to treat the heartworms....wondering if they kept him crated most of the time.......

I have a crate, but also 25 acres that is fenced. My dogs don't dig out, but I'm not going to say it isn't possible. Also, not sure what he'll do with the horses (both of mine I got much younger, doing the horse introduction was so easy).

I'm hoping to crate him and run with him on the farm on a leash and maybe he'll settle? My girls are high energy, believe me, but they dart ahead, then come back, always checking my position. He seems oblivious to humans. Does not lead for crap......although that could be his ubber excitement.

I'll get him either Saturday or Tuesday, then have to start heartworm treatment. Vet thought she could do it for 300-400, based on his weight. I'll have to see if there are special considerations while he is being treated, I've never had to do that before.

Anyone adopted an adult dog that was in a kennel for 30 days and had any special ways they handled introducing the horses (and CATS!). My girls know the cats are off limits.

LAZ
Jan. 28, 2010, 03:26 PM
I have a shorthairs as well.

The breeder I got my first dog from gave me one of her dogs--at almost 2 he was intact, had been a kennel raised dog and never been kept in the house. I gave him to my parents, but took him with me to socialize him a bit. He took to my Jakey dog and I was able to take the two of them out for walks off the leash because Jake would always come when I called and Hank learned to come with him.

He ended up being a fabulous dog for my parents (in spite of losing his sight due to retinal issues). He was devoted to them until he died, and is the standard to which they compare all their dogs. He was also a very resourceful dog, he learned to open cabinets and would counter surf with the best of them in spite of being blind!

Good luck with your rescue, and I bet he quickly discovers which side his bread is buttered on and makes friends with you.

harveyhorses
Jan. 28, 2010, 03:31 PM
IWe tried to do that once, it did not end well. Beautifu choc. lab. Was o.k. with us at AC, and on the leash. He was 3 not fixed, had been there for two weeks. He was fine with our spayed female, but could NOT be trusted. He barrled over me in the gate, got loose and would not be caught. He finally came back to his girlfriend. Brought them in the house the first time, had him on a leash, he tried to eat one of the cats, and in the 'chase' dragged me into the edge of the woodstove. He had a choke chain on, it just had no effect on him. Still determined to give him a try, I had him on a short short lead and tried to teach him cats were not on the menu, when I stopped him and said "NO" he bit me. I am actully pretty good with dogs, have done obideince trainig with three of them. This one just did not give one fuzzy rats about interacting with humans.
Please please be careful.

Sorry for the spelling

pcwertb
Jan. 28, 2010, 03:41 PM
This guy was friendly. Not aggressive at all, just rather uncaring about humans. I do think I can get his attention on a leash, but it will take some work though.

I wonder how long before all the testosterone is out of his system.

CB/TB
Jan. 29, 2010, 09:00 AM
Shorthairs, as you probably know, can be tough! We're on our 5th (over the years) girl now. the rescue we adopted last spring is very old and arthritic, but we couldn't leave her at the shelter. That shelter would not release her to our local GSP rescue, so we had to grab her as her adoption chances were pretty slim at her age and health. We have a fenced back yard, but take them out to the pasture 3-4 times a day. The old one, arthritic as she was( is) chased the goats for a few days until they bowled her over a few times. The horse tried to corner her at first, but she soon learned and now they ignore each other. Our younger girl chased the goats at first, but after she was put in her place, no problem. You hate to have them hurt, but sometimes a good scare gets the point across. You could always attach a check cord to the new guy until you felt he could be trusted. It might takea while for him to come out of his shell. I'm sure he has energy to spare after being kenneled for so long, but all you can do is try. You have experience with teh breed, so that will help. Good luck.

LauraKY
Jan. 29, 2010, 09:03 AM
IWe tried to do that once, it did not end well. Beautifu choc. lab. Was o.k. with us at AC, and on the leash. He was 3 not fixed, had been there for two weeks. He was fine with our spayed female, but could NOT be trusted. He barrled over me in the gate, got loose and would not be caught. He finally came back to his girlfriend. Brought them in the house the first time, had him on a leash, he tried to eat one of the cats, and in the 'chase' dragged me into the edge of the woodstove. He had a choke chain on, it just had no effect on him. Still determined to give him a try, I had him on a short short lead and tried to teach him cats were not on the menu, when I stopped him and said "NO" he bit me. I am actully pretty good with dogs, have done obideince trainig with three of them. This one just did not give one fuzzy rats about interacting with humans.
Please please be careful.

Sorry for the spelling

Whew. Sounds like the poor lab needed some intensive training! Of course he went after the cats, even with a choke collar, it's instinct. Took ours about 6 months to not chase the barn cats and one of the cats still hates him. BUT, we didn't put him in a position where he was able to chase them. If you don't know how to train a high energy dog i.e. a lab, especially from the pound, don't try!

I've rarely met a lab that is impossible to train. We just treat them like horses...it takes time, consistency and patience!

swmorse
Jan. 29, 2010, 12:39 PM
I can tell you a bit about the heartworm treatment. Years ago I adopted a dog from my vet that they had caught running down the highway. She had heartworms and they treated her (and I didn't have to pay for the treatment).

due to the medication, though, she was to be kept quiet and on a leash outside because if she got to running around something about the dead heartworms could kill her. I didn't keep her on the leash at first because they didn't tell me that part, and she wasn't really running about. But, I did notice she coughed and when I brought her back for a check-up, that's when they told me about the keep her on a leash because ... don't know if that's still the case or not, but...

So, maybe by the time you can let him off leash, he'll be attached to you.

By the way, Lucy lived a long life, unfortunately dying of cancer of the throat long after the heartworm incident.

vineyridge
Jan. 29, 2010, 06:54 PM
Personally, I'm attached to prong collars rather than choke chains for tough dogs. They will not injure themselves straining against the prongs as they will if they ignore a choke chain. You can get little plastic covers for the prongs or you can get a plastic version that has v's instead of prongs. You can also now get the metal ones that have a snap fastener for ease in putting on the dog. :)

Of course, you have to be there when the collar is on the dog, but the same is true of a chain collar.

They really work well with tough dogs with coats--or without coats.

pcwertb
Jan. 29, 2010, 07:13 PM
I did hear that heartworm treatment means keeping them pretty inactive. Sigh, he's been cooped up for a month. I guess walking him on lead is ok.

I have a prong collar of sorts. Don Sullivan's collar, I really like it. Plastic prongs but worked well with my girls :)

My husband really is going to murder me over this one. But I couldn't leave him at the shelter!

EventerAJ
Jan. 29, 2010, 07:17 PM
It's hard to really assess a dog's temperament at a shelter. The environment is so confined, most of them are just HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY to be out of the cage, seeing other dogs, new smells, etc. They do tend to be oblivious to people-- happy to be let out, but then dragging you around as they explore the world outside of the pen.

I volunteered at a shelter once a week for over a year before I adopted a dog of my own. I took lots of them out for walks in the fenced yard; almost all of them ignored me most of the time, looking to play with other dogs or just run around. Most of them seem VERY hyper, but they settle down once they get a good home. Sort of like racehorses at the track...they are excited to go out and it takes a little time to adjust back to "real life." It's easy to think that "All these dogs are crazy!!" just like "All these racehorses are crazy!" when it is mostly due to confinement and limited exercise. It may take a lot of work retraining the dog (just as an OTTB), but it's usually worth the effort. :)

My girl was at the shelter for about 3 weeks, as an Owner Gave Up (unknown why?). She was hyper, happy, and distracted at the shelter-- but I could tell she had the ability to focus (the Tennis Ball Stare) and was not aggressive or fearful. I took her on not knowing if she'd chase horses-- thankfully she doesn't. She bonded to me immediately on the car ride home, and settled in well after about 3 days. Lots of running on the farm, and she sleeps like a rock inside, quiet and calm as you please. MUCH different from the uppity shelter dog she once was. :)

cloudy18
Jan. 30, 2010, 10:57 AM
Just give the poor dog time. There's no telling what his personality will be once he is feeling better, neutered, and hopefully bonded to you.

Google NILIF (Nothing In Life Is Free), it's a great way to get a dog to realize where all the good stuff in life comes from-you. And hopefully avoid any aggression that might happen bc he isn't sure who's boss.

I prefer prong collars over chokes too, and the prong collars can also be put on backwards, so you have a choke type collar without the prongs if you really don't need them. Used this way they are less likely to pinch a dog than choke collars, and are probably more comfortable bc they have more surface area than those skinny links on a choke collar.

cheval convert
Jan. 30, 2010, 11:12 AM
IWe tried to do that once, it did not end well. Beautifu choc. lab. Was o.k. with us at AC, and on the leash. He was 3 not fixed, had been there for two weeks. He was fine with our spayed female, but could NOT be trusted. He barrled over me in the gate, got loose and would not be caught. He finally came back to his girlfriend. Brought them in the house the first time, had him on a leash, he tried to eat one of the cats, and in the 'chase' dragged me into the edge of the woodstove. He had a choke chain on, it just had no effect on him. Still determined to give him a try, I had him on a short short lead and tried to teach him cats were not on the menu, when I stopped him and said "NO" he bit me. I am actully pretty good with dogs, have done obideince trainig with three of them. This one just did not give one fuzzy rats about interacting with humans.
Please please be careful.

Sorry for the spelling

These type of dogs take a lot of work but the end result is so worth it.

When I adopted my third aussie, he was a rescue. I had done obedience with my other 2 and "thought" I knew how to deal with an aussie. Well Shea quickly helped me shed that illusion! I made a lot of progress with him even though he preferred fetching over petting and definitely lived to please himself, not me. I left him with a trainer for a month and that took care of his basic issues, although training continues to this day (1.5 years later). It was not until the last 6 months that Shea figured out that he likes being petted and just hanging out with us. He still likes to fetch (that's just his OCD kicking in) but he is contented now to lie down with us and cuddle. His behaviour has improved tremendously and he is truly bonded to us. He ignores horses when on leash, but I still don't trust him off leash - one more issue to deal with. Instead of the bad boy of the neighborhood that he used to be he is now a favorite for the kids to come over to the yard to throw the frisbee for him.

OP, take a chance on this dog. If you find you are over your head find a trainer to help you. Make sure the trainer's methods fit your dog's temperament. (Shea needed a trainer that would give him a "come to Jesus" session if he needed it.) And give it a lot of time. (We are at almost 2 years and are still a work in progress.) You will not regret it.

pcwertb
Jan. 30, 2010, 06:40 PM
I have him at home. He is much more personable! Was great off leash, barked at the horses at first but a bit intimidated by their size. Is great with my kids and wants to play with my girls but so far they are standoffish. Don't know they have met a boy dog before, all girls!

He seems to have been owned by a man, he is all into my hubby. And I have to say the only real problem I see is that when I crate him (he needs to be crated in the house, I don't know him well enough otherwise) he barks non-stop. So I temporarily moved his crate the garage...well lit but my toddler had to sleep this afternoon. I've had him out on three occasions for a total of three hours but he is in over drive mode when we try to take him inside. That may take a bit more work. He was content on a long leash to hang with me for 20 minutes on the playground (on our own farm) and I even let him off leash for some long romps and he was very good.

How do I convince him to quit barking? My other shorthairs rarely bark.

JanM
Jan. 30, 2010, 08:09 PM
He might not have been crated before, and maybe the barking is his way of celebrating his new home, making his mark? Maybe he needs a lot more exercise since he's been cooped up at the pound (maybe lunging?). Is he neutered? I'm sure he'll settle down and the girls will get used to him. After I brought my unneutered Mini Schnauzer home (I couldn't get this done for a week-long damn week too) the neighbors probably got tired of me yelling at him to stop trying to hump his 'sister' (my older dog) and it took a while for him to settle down after his snipping.

appytoo
Jan. 30, 2010, 11:55 PM
When he is in his crate, try covering it with a light sheet or blanket. If you are using an airline style crate, you don't need to worry about him pulling the sheet through the wire spacing. If you are using a wire crate, check on him from time to time to make sure he is not pulling the cover into the crate and shredding it. Many will quiet down when the crate is covered. I would do my best to let him be in the house in his crate if your other dogs are inside though.

Heartworm treatment is tough. He will have to be crated and the only walking those first few weeks will be simply on leash to potty. Nothing more. No playing, no romping, no running - crated and hand walked to potty only. He may feel really lousy and he may cough up yucky yellow and white crud through both his nose and his mouth the first couple weeks. The first injection can be quite painful and some dogs are really really miserable. After the first month, he will get a second injection and should have the all clear to resume exercise and activity.

CB/TB
Jan. 31, 2010, 11:04 AM
Our GSP rescue was/is a barker. When I'd take her out to the pasture she'd bark and bark and bark- about nothing in particular. I figured I had to stop it before the neighbors complained, not to mention it was driving me nuts whenever we went out. Wanting to start with the least expensive and not wanting anything that could bother the other dog, I ordered the Citronella spray collar from Smartpak. About $60. It's battery operated and emits a ( refillable) citronella spray whenever the dog barks. You have to turn it on/off, so I guess the dog could wear it all day or night. It's not meant to be THE collar. It worked with the first bark on Lola. I have seen them at Petsmart/Petco, etc. It would be worth a try with your guy. Good for you for adopting him.

jetsmom
Jan. 31, 2010, 11:30 AM
I used a Citronella (although mine was lemon scented) collar with a dog that barked, and he learned to quit barking when I told him within a day. I had the kind that I would activate after first having it make a beep. So the dog would learn that if I said that's enough, and he kept barking, it beeped, and after the beep he would get a spray. I had to spray twice. Then I just needed to beep and he'd quit. Then just telling him that's enough, and he'd stop.

Do ask your vet about limits of exercise when on heartworm treatment. My understanding was that they are crated always, and walked on a leash just a short ways to potty, then back in the crate. I think they can get an embolism or clot from the dying off worms if their heart pumps too hard. So no excitement/physical exercise.

harveyhorses
Feb. 1, 2010, 09:06 AM
Glad it's working for you.
25 years ago I had never heard of a prong collar. I was not prepared to deal with a dog who BIT ME when corrected. He was not the first lab I'd had, mostly they are a bit hyper, but really willing to please, this one just flat did not care about pats, or lap, or human contact. If I had the choice again, I would never have picked him. I am willing to put in the work, but I am not willing to be bitten. A case of 'if I knew now'.
We had one that needed to go through heartworm treatment and the hard part was keeping him quiet. He was so bored, and felt rotten, I spent a lot of time sitting on the floor, with his head in my lap.

witherbee
Feb. 1, 2010, 09:43 AM
My lab/hound mix was at the shelter for over 4 months. She just wasn't the type of dog that said "take me" - very cowed (tail between the legs and lots of white to her eyes) and sad looking and is black with some white on her chest and a very gray muzzle. She was only 3 years old when I got her (2 years ago), and so I think people thought she was an old scared dog. I actually went looking to give an old dog a home, and when they told me how long she had been there,, my heart broke for her. Tried her with the "test cat" at the shelter and she had no interest and was good with my dogs (not totally interested in them either at the time).

Took her home and we have the Dogwatch Hidden Fence system, which oddly she seemed familiar with/trained to, and she was very nervous around people. I was afraid that she might be a fear biter - barked even in the house and even after being introduced (my poor Dad was visiting and every time he stood up she'd bark with that big hound bark). I just kept things quiet with her and worked with her. She gets very nervous if I try to teach her to sit or lay down, so I just taught her to come and she's fine on a leash, so that is enough for me.

She's turned out to be a fabulous dog - sweet, quiet and kind and now very confident.

Here is her shelter picture:
http://s74.photobucket.com/albums/i245/wtryan/Our%20Pets/Shadow/?action=view&current=ShadowsHumaneSocietypicture.jpg

Here she is now:
http://s74.photobucket.com/albums/i245/wtryan/Our%20Pets/Shadow/?start=all

and recent pro photos I had taken:
http://www.naturalpetphotography.com/clients/thumbnails.php?album=35
password is ry3n

pcwertb
Feb. 2, 2010, 02:23 PM
Charlie goes to the vet today but wow, he has really settled in to be a nice dog. He's now in the house with mine at night, crated, no barking. WOO HOO!

Loves men, just adores them. Driving my hubby nuts, following him around. Must have been owned by a guy. Great with my kids. A bit keen on my cats, so far they haven't let him get close on the porch.

Let's see if I can upload a pic.

CB/TB
Feb. 2, 2010, 03:18 PM
See, we TOLD ya! He is cute and looks happy to have a home. You never know how the GSPs will behave with cats. Our last dearly departed GSP had cats in the breeder's home, but ended up a cat chaser. She was very "cat sharp", they call it. Bella , the coming 3 yo sleeps on the couch with our cat, they nuzzle each other and every so often will do a half hearted chase to the cat door. Lola, the rescue will chase sometimes, but mainly pretends she doesn't exist. the cat does stay away from her, but will saunter by on the way to the water dish stopping just out of range , just to be sure Lola sees her. We had no idea how she'd be with cats. She ignored the cats at the shelter, but until we got her home - anyone's guess. Charlie and the cats will just have to work it out, but I'm sure things will fall into place.

pcwertb
Feb. 2, 2010, 08:29 PM
My pony stomped him :( He's fine, surprised as he was just trotting through the pasture to go potty and she got him from behind. Luckily I was right there and she was more of afraid of me then continuing her attack. My neighbors must think I am the crazy lady, 7am and screaming "You bit.... as I throw an empty muck bucket at her!".

Guess he'll be more careful now, but sheesh!

exie4me
Feb. 2, 2010, 10:26 PM
I don't believe you dogs behavior is a result 30 days in a kennel. We had a boarding kennel for 18 yrs and found at least a third of the med/lg dogs had no manners or training. They were just exuberant, pull you around, knock you over happy kids. Before we built our exercise yard we walked the dogs no matter what the weather. When it was icy I was afraid of being pulled down so I used halti collars. They work like a horse halter. So you take their head away and they can't run. They didn't like them at first but, got used to them and it trained them not to pull. Also used a harness that opened like a butterfly put 2 front legs through the wings and pulled it up tight on the back it worked pretty well too. I used it on eng pointer that was quite a hunter, that was all that was on his mind when we went out. He would put his nose to the ground and pull like a sled dog. It was hard to get it on a spinning, jumping happy dog. So I used the halti more. I bet once your new dog gets to know you and realizes he's been castrated he will be a different dog. Kudos's to you.