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View Full Version : What information is on a medical armband?



JLK
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:29 PM
The thread on Darren Chiacchia's current problems has some comments on whether HIV status should be on the medical armband. I'm not an eventer, so I've never looked at the armband. What information is on there?

Phaxxton
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:31 PM
See here: http://useventing.com/resources/files/docs/c-f-1004-USEAMedicalCards.pdf

ETA -- FTR, it does ask if you have any "serious illnesses."

AppJumpr08
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:31 PM
Medical Armband PDF (http://useventing.com/resources/files/docs/c-f-1004-USEAMedicalCards.pdf)

bip
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:41 PM
EMTs and other medical workers are taught to treat all bodily fluids as if they were positive for a blood-borne disease. In fact, I thought it was just general common practice - I learned it in high school more than 15 years ago.

HIV isn't the only thing blood and other bodily fluids carry, and people can have contagious things without even knowing it.

There is no reason to treat a known HIV positive person any different than a person whose status is unknown or even tested negative.

Don't touch blood, semen, or vaginal fluids. It is just common sense.

Phaxxton
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:56 PM
EMTs and other medical workers are taught to treat all bodily fluids as if they were positive for a blood-borne disease. In fact, I thought it was just general common practice - I learned it in high school more than 15 years ago.

HIV isn't the only thing blood and other bodily fluids carry, and people can have contagious things without even knowing it.

There is no reason to treat a known HIV positive person any different than a person whose status is unknown or even tested negative.

Don't touch blood, semen, or vaginal fluids. It is just common sense.

Agreed, especially since there are also often greater chances of contracting something other than HIV from bodily fluids.

cnvh
Jan. 22, 2010, 02:10 PM
EMTs and other medical workers are taught to treat all bodily fluids as if they were positive for a blood-borne disease. In fact, I thought it was just general common practice - I learned it in high school more than 15 years ago.

HIV isn't the only thing blood and other bodily fluids carry, and people can have contagious things without even knowing it.

There is no reason to treat a known HIV positive person any different than a person whose status is unknown or even tested negative.

Don't touch blood, semen, or vaginal fluids. It is just common sense.

So agree with this... it would seem like a no-brainer. Heck, a negative HIV test (or any test, for that matter) is only effective up until the moment the blood sample was taken, so a negative test result certainly shouldn't be treated as gospel either.

Universal precautions, people-- universal precautions.