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View Full Version : Trying to remember some old fashion remedies that worked... in the barn. :)



Horsecrazy27
Jan. 22, 2010, 03:03 AM
I swear that I remember using sugar and betadine to put on proud flesh, as well as "wonder dust". Bacon grease on something??? LOL

Anyone else remember some of those old tricks?

I remember a cowboy giving his horse 3 cans of copenhagan twice a year to "worm him". LOL

Just thought this would be fun.

Lulu
Jan. 22, 2010, 03:58 AM
Maxi-pads and Desitin for scratches.

CB/TB
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:05 AM
A friend used to get the used fryolator oil from a restaurant and used it as hoof dressing. Same as bacon grease. Bleach solution for thrush. Corn starch packed onto white socks and brushed out for that whiter chrome. Blueing in rinse water for grey/white horses. Desitin to keep flies away. I knew an old retired cavalry officer who kept a kerosene soaked piece of burlap in a coffee can and used it as fly repellant by rubbing the rag over the horse.

Tom Stovall
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:11 AM
Wet saddle pads still work. :)

Heart's Journey
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:16 AM
some of those sound pretty scary to me!

Claddagh
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:34 AM
I swear that I remember using sugar and betadine to put on proud flesh, as well as "wonder dust". ...



You're right - it's called Sugardine and is still used. I've used it for a hoof abscess - worked like a charm!

here is some information about Sugardine:

http://www.horses-and-ponies.com/health/sugardine.shtml

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Some of those *old time* remedies really do work. I remember an elderly friend once telling me about her old vet's homemade colic remedy. Don't know how well it worked but it was probably from way before any of the modern colic treatments were available (that vet practiced a long, long time ago). Anyway, his remedy was a mixture of instant coffee, baking soda, and ground ginger mixed into a paste and oral dosed by syringe. Actually I have read (on the web) about people still using this or something similar. I guess maybe it couldn't hurt if you don't have any Banamine on hand and your vet isn't right around the corner!

Unprovoked92
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:53 AM
I've heard of salted granny smith apples the day after gas colic. We've always made our sugardine with brown sugar because it supposedly has more antiinflammatory properties than white sugar. Equal parts furazone safeguard dewormer and DMSO for scratches. I've heard of a listerine Avon skin so soft and something else for skin "funk".

Carolinadreamin'
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:56 AM
Desitin or generic diaper rash ointment (40% zinc oxide) to protect pink noses in the summer.

egontoast
Jan. 22, 2010, 10:34 AM
My vet still likes 'sugardene' better then commercial alternatives for hoof abscesses.

We always used Pine tar and neatsfoot oil mixed together for hooves. Made it up in a can and applied with paint brush.

epsom salts for many things.


Old farmer when we were kids swore by kerosene mixed with pine tar for wounds. have no idea if it worked! I still remember seeing that smeared on a wound on one of his work horses.

There are many more. I have to think..:)

Lulu
Jan. 22, 2010, 11:48 AM
I've heard about Palmolive for gas colic, but never tried it myself. Two drops in the feed as a preventative. A syringeful to treat.

SmartAlex
Jan. 22, 2010, 12:20 PM
Wet saddle pads still work. :)

I don't have time for that... can't I get something to apply topically? Neatly packaged? That shows up as if by magic once a month? :winkgrin: I have a credit card :yes:

Jane Honda
Jan. 22, 2010, 12:44 PM
I remember my granny using old motor oil for hooves if they started cracking and not holding shoes. She also used tobacco to worm my pony.


I have heard of the kerosene for fly repellent as well.

hey101
Jan. 22, 2010, 12:56 PM
I love Wonder Dust. I use it all the time for minor scrapes and cuts. Helped a gal at the barn just the other week whose horse gave himself a pretty good scrape- one of those "not worth a vet call but still kinda ugly" things. Puffed it with Wonder Dust, I saw her just last night and she told me it healed perfectly. :yes:

sadlmakr
Jan. 22, 2010, 12:57 PM
My Grandfather used lindseed oil on the dry hoofs of his draft mules. But I used neats foot oil on my horses. Worked well.
Cowboys used bacon grease or lard on their horses wounds because that is all they had. It kept the flies off and kept the air off so the wounds could heal.
There are some old time recipes they still use in vet science.
Nice posts. sadlmakr




I remember my granny using old motor oil for hooves if they started cracking and not holding shoes. She also used tobacco to worm my pony.


I have heard of the kerosene for fly repellent as well.

Bells
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:22 PM
Sauerkraut for scratches. I've used it on a bad, long term case (after many other different remedies) and it really helped.

deltawave
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:30 PM
Didn't they used to "drench" horses with whiskey for colic? Might help a little with the spasmodic type, I guess. :)

LJ1972
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:36 PM
Who else can remember when worming your horse involved having a vet come out, insert a long rubber hose up the horse's nostril down into the stomach, and pour a liquid worm medicine through the tube directly into the stomach...

I also remember a man who used a rag soaked with kerosene to rub over a horse at a show to put a shine on the coat.

2DogsFarm
Jan. 22, 2010, 01:53 PM
Ivory soap flakes & corn syrup for deep wounds.
(home health agency I work for told me nurses still use this mixture for bedsores!)

LJ1972:
Not only do I recall "tube-worming" for parasites, but my own horses were wormed this way once a year until 2000!
(Ok - took a little time for me to catch up with technology...)

Equine chiropractor once advised me to use Palmolive to sweat a stifle.
Leave on overnight, then rinse off the next day. Darn stuff took the hair off down to the skin! :eek:

And who's calling WonderDust "old fashioned"??? :mad:

CB/TB
Jan. 22, 2010, 02:41 PM
I just remembered my Great Uncle used a blend of flowers of sulfur and lard as a wound salve. Some of these are pretty scary!!

deltawave
Jan. 22, 2010, 03:56 PM
a blend of flowers of sulfur and lard

Boy, I'd say that sounds an awful lot like that yucky "MTG" stuff! :dead:

DMK
Jan. 22, 2010, 03:57 PM
I just remembered my Great Uncle used a blend of flowers of sulfur and lard as a wound salve. Some of these are pretty scary!!

Sulfur and cod liver oil is useful stuff if not thoroughly vile, the modern variation on it is call "MTG". ;) Lard would just be a "salve" version instead of liquid.

I remember used motor oil for rain rot and feet, and of course I remember tube worming, along with that other tube worming we did for bots. I ALSO remember the first few times we tube wormed with that fancy new wonder drug called "ivermectin". Since I lived in SFL, landed of 24/7/365 worm infestation and multiple horses kept on small acreage, that made for some interesting reactions with ventral edema!

deltawave
Jan. 22, 2010, 04:01 PM
DMK, jinx! :)

texang73
Jan. 22, 2010, 04:09 PM
When I was a kid, I don't know if it was homemade (didn't have a label, so who knows?), but we had a very distinctive smelling purple liquid that we'd use for cuts and scrapes and "fly nests" on bellys...

The smell was quite pungent, but I liked it!

Ideas on what it might've been?

deltawave
Jan. 22, 2010, 04:31 PM
Gentian violet?

AnotherRound
Jan. 22, 2010, 04:49 PM
Yeah, I remember Gentian violet. Anyone remember a linement which was brown, came in a small octagon shapped tall thin bottle, old fasion black and white printed lable on it, very strong foul smelling stuff. I was told to dilute it, and that using it straight would blister the horse. I was told it was used to blister - they would blister the cannon to prevent soft tissue injuries, on the same premise they would pin fire to prevent splints?

I remember that this liniment was advertised in The Chronicle of the Horse!!

Zu Zu
Jan. 22, 2010, 05:29 PM
[quote=LJ1972;4635141]Who else can remember when worming your horse involved having a vet come out, insert a long rubber hose up the horse's nostril down into the stomach, and pour a liquid worm medicine through the tube directly into the stomach...
One of the old boarding barns where I boarded for awhile - did this - they withheld ~ food 24 hours in advance ~ no hay no grain sunday pm and Monday am - only water - and then tube wormed ~ Monday-- Lots of colic on Tuesday. I would have to sneek food into my older mare on Sunday (grain and hay) in order to prevent her Tuesday colic episode. Terrible :eek:practice in my opinion just too rough on their systems. I did not board there very long.

MassageLady
Jan. 22, 2010, 06:28 PM
marigold flowers for stomach problems-combine triple antibiotic, desnex and desitin for most any infection or wound

DMK
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:00 PM
Yeah, I remember Gentian violet. Anyone remember a linement which was brown, came in a small octagon shapped tall thin bottle, old fasion black and white printed lable on it, very strong foul smelling stuff. I was told to dilute it, and that using it straight would blister the horse. I was told it was used to blister - they would blister the cannon to prevent soft tissue injuries, on the same premise they would pin fire to prevent splints?

I remember that this liniment was advertised in The Chronicle of the Horse!!

Tuttles Elexer!

It was a body wash, not a blister. We had really powerful shit for that purpose. Ah yes, when selling ether and 10% iodine was legal... ;) But for a lightweight blister, Reducine was the first choice for most non-track people, or maybe Splintex. All of which are still out there today.

I never met a vet who did preemptive pin firing (and when I say I handled 100's of horses after pin fires and blisters I might be understating it), the only variation was when you had a horse who kept almost but not quite bucking his shins. Sooner or later the trainer would give up on trying to get them to buck and just get him fired and be done with it.

Lulu
Jan. 22, 2010, 09:52 PM
I remember my granny using old motor oil for hooves if they started cracking and not holding shoes.

This reminds me of the time I was at a hot summer show, circa 1982, and one of the grooms left some excess motor oil in a paper cup. Along comes a girl I rode with, parched from showing... Imagine her surprise when she realized (after slugging about half the cup) that it wasn't a Pepsi! I'll never forget it.

WW_Queen
Jan. 22, 2010, 11:10 PM
Seriously? Wonderdust is a thing of the past?! Oh boy...

Here are some (not necessarily health-related but...):

-Using straw to make a wisp (or put under a wool cooler to cool them out on the hot-walker)

-DMSO and/or furacin (aka furazone) cured EVERYTHING. Literally everything

-Vaseline. Used on the shoulders to prevent/heal blanket rubs. Used in the feet to prevent snowballs. Used on the face before showing to highlight dark features

-Gatorade (sometimes mixed with electrolytes) shot into the mouth with a syringe in the 10 minute box

...and wonderdust went on anything that didn't require stitches. :D

Go Fish
Jan. 23, 2010, 01:56 AM
Bag Balm

When I used to ride western, we had a silver polish that came in a baby blue spray can...best damn stuff ever made.

Horsecrazy27
Jan. 23, 2010, 06:05 PM
Bag Balm

When I used to ride western, we had a silver polish that came in a baby blue spray can...best damn stuff ever made.

I remember when a friend and I squirted some of that bluing stuff in a bucket, dipped our pinto's tail in it---the she wagged her tail and had blue dots all over her. (We used too much!)

Toothpaste for silver....

Babypowder on legs. (white)

pines4equines
Jan. 24, 2010, 04:49 PM
I worked for an elderly lady in the 70s who did black coffee and whiskey for colic.

Her horses were well cared for and many lived into their 30s which was not the norm in the 60s - 70s. She did not worm rather "A good grooming is worth two quarts of oats!" In the 80s when she was very old, we took over the care of her horses and I wanted to worm them and came up against a brick wall. Consequently, I had to worm them myself on my dime and it was the tube worming which we did twice a year.

scavenger
Jan. 24, 2010, 05:59 PM
turpintine and linseed oil 1/2 and 1/2 on sole and walls below coronet band as a toughener and hoof dressing my mother's old farriesrs receipe.Still use it great for toughing soles and puts abeautiful shine.
another one lead acetate and zinc sulfate ( forget amount) to 1 gallon of water called White Lotion. Used as leg tightener and and anyother swelling suspected to be soft tissue origin. Wrap leg and pour a slug of it in the bandage and the pour more in any time you go by the stall.
Also remember tube worming and flowers of sulfer with lard/

Gnalli
Jan. 24, 2010, 06:13 PM
some of those sound pretty scary to me!
They may, but they work.

Flour will clot up a cut.
Preperation H will pull the edges of a cut together (sounds gross, but works)
Oragel or Chloraseptic works as a qick topical pain killer

Daddy would give Redman tobacco to his mules to worm them, and sometimes to his show horses.

A tomato paste can of cotton seed meal added to feed adds protein to feed and makes them slick out (but no more than a paste can as it is potent)

Beer added to feed will add calories and make the coat shiny,helping to fatten a horse

I think it was pine tar/turpentine and something else was used as a hoof dressing-I ca't remember that one/

Knox gelatin (or just jello powder) helps with hoof growth.

kookicat
Jan. 24, 2010, 06:13 PM
Seriously? Wonderdust is a thing of the past?! Oh boy...

Here are some (not necessarily health-related but...):

-Using straw to make a wisp (or put under a wool cooler to cool them out on the hot-walker)

-DMSO and/or furacin (aka furazone) cured EVERYTHING. Literally everything

-Vaseline. Used on the shoulders to prevent/heal blanket rubs. Used in the feet to prevent snowballs. Used on the face before showing to highlight dark features

-Gatorade (sometimes mixed with electrolytes) shot into the mouth with a syringe in the 10 minute box

...and wonderdust went on anything that didn't require stitches. :D

Heh. I can still make wisps now. Learned from a scary old PC instructor as a kid.

Gnalli
Jan. 24, 2010, 06:17 PM
Who else can remember when worming your horse involved having a vet come out, insert a long rubber hose up the horse's nostril down into the stomach, and pour a liquid worm medicine through the tube directly into the stomach...

I also remember a man who used a rag soaked with kerosene to rub over a horse at a show to put a shine on the coat.

I've seen that done a time or 2 growing up. Works on black horses great, but the trick is that the rag is just barely damp.

Horsecrazy27
Jan. 24, 2010, 08:09 PM
So, I wasn't the only one to see someone using tobacco to worm a horse? LOL

howardh
Jan. 24, 2010, 08:25 PM
cider vinegar added to feed cures all ills or something like that....

Simbalism
Jan. 25, 2010, 02:39 AM
I still use wonder dust. My friend swears by Listerine and baby oil sprayed on for scratches.

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Jan. 25, 2010, 10:01 AM
The sauerkraut/scratches thing works because of the vinegar in sauerkraut. Diluted vinegar on scratches works incredibly, incredibly well. It also relieves the itching/discomfort associated with scratches. It's a great thing to add to a post-bath rinse, as it treats/relieves all kind of coat related ailments.

Liberty
Jan. 25, 2010, 10:35 AM
Oh yes, I remember tube worming. Had my horses done that way back in the early 70's. I was aghasted when I first witnessed the process as a newbie 14-yr-old horseowner.

My first horse had a mild colic (her one and only in 28 years I had her), and the vet tubed her with a bottle of Pepto Bismol (again, this was back in the 70's). Worked like a charm.

I do keep a couple bottles of Maalox (mint flavored) in the barn and give my horses 50cc or so whenever the weather starts making colic-type changes. It has also worked to give relief at the first sign of a gas colic in lieu of Banamine.

RE: sauerkraut for scratches - I do believe it can work, but if there are any open, raw areas, it will sting like a b*tch. My mare let me know that, loud and clear. If one is going to use it, DON'T pick off any scabs beforehand.

Someone mentioned Preparation H - it can also work to help relieve a mild case of scratches. I'll never forget the look on the cashier's face at the Dollar Store when I plunked down 4 large tubes of generic Prep H. "Seriously, it's not for me; it's for my horse. Oh wait, NO, not what you're thinking; it's for her LEGS." *yeah, sure*... :lol:

Been a Wonderdust user since the 70's, and will remain one. Great stuff!

suz
Jan. 25, 2010, 10:56 AM
these are great--keep 'em coming!
so, what about that tobacco worming techinque? given that we hear all the scary talk about worm resistance, i wonder if going back to tobacco just might be a reasonable addition to ivermectin and equi-max.
what do you think?

Bezysmom
Jan. 25, 2010, 11:48 AM
I remember tube worming. Scared me then and I was ever so glad to go to paste.

I had a mare years ago who got a fairly minor looking cut on her leg. I treated it with no results, then had the vet out. We gave her antiboitics with no improvement. My trainer said, "Well I knew an old mule skinner once who was getting ready to put lime on an ugly wound on one of his mules. When I saw the mule a week later it was all healed." We decided since nothing else was working I'd try it. Took a handful of the lime I used for stalls and globbed it on. (It stuck since the wound was still draining) The wound healed right up. I've never used it since (it was pretty much a last resort sort of thing) but I've often wondered if Wonder Dust doesn't have some lime in it. I does work.

Jane Honda
Jan. 25, 2010, 06:27 PM
This reminds me of the time I was at a hot summer show, circa 1982, and one of the grooms left some excess motor oil in a paper cup. Along comes a girl I rode with, parched from showing... Imagine her surprise when she realized (after slugging about half the cup) that it wasn't a Pepsi! I'll never forget it.



:eek:


We need a puke smilie!



What was her reaction?

WarHorse
Jan. 25, 2010, 07:58 PM
The wound healed right up. I've never used it since (it was pretty much a last resort sort of thing) but I've often wondered if Wonder Dust doesn't have some lime in it. I does work.

Bing-O! Seventy-one percent:

http://www.drugs.com/vet/wonder-dust-wound-powder.html

Great stuff. :cool:

DMK
Jan. 25, 2010, 08:06 PM
i wonder if going back to tobacco just might be a reasonable addition to ivermectin and equi-max.
what do you think?

I think some of the old time remedies are still useful, and new doesn't always equal better. However in this case, modern wormers vs. tobacco is most certainly NOT one of those cases.

DMSO+furacin - so very not just an old time treatment, just a treatment that has been around for a while and still going strong!

murphyluv
Jan. 25, 2010, 10:02 PM
had a vet tell me to use lime on a small wound that was getting proud flesh. Used it once and it healed right up.

Gnalli
Feb. 14, 2010, 09:35 PM
these are great--keep 'em coming!
so, what about that tobacco worming techinque? given that we hear all the scary talk about worm resistance, i wonder if going back to tobacco just might be a reasonable addition to ivermectin and equi-max.
what do you think?

I just can't see that it would hurt in addition to the normal rotation. I think I will try it again. Have not done it in years, and it would be a good experiment. Daddy had the prettiest bay molly mule that would just about mug him for a chew of tobacco, and she was never wormy. She was GORGEOUS.