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View Full Version : Spinoff: Please share your LSD training tips



jenm
Jan. 20, 2010, 02:32 PM
My horse and I will be competing in our first year of recognized events this year at BN. With our background, this will be a huge accomplishment for us and I'm very excited.

Even though we are competing at a low level, I want to keep my horse as healthy and strong as possible and am looking for more words of wisdom and advice on LSD training. I did a search and it seems there are bits and pieces of information on different threads, but I could not find one thread that only addresses this topic. If there is one, I would appreciate it if someone could point it out to me. If not, please share your training tips.

My horse is currently boarded at a facility that only has arenas with no trail access, but I can trailer out.

Thank you!

P.S. I got the idea here:


I think it is most liklely due to insufficient LSD, rather than footing or turnout.

No, not THAT kind of LSD, even if you are in CA.

LSD = Long Slow Distance, done to build up bone, muscle, ligament and tendon BEFORE you start interval training for heart and lungs.

scubed
Jan. 20, 2010, 02:40 PM
I run as well as ride so (other than drugs) the only thing that comes to mind when you say LSD is long-slow-distance, something I do when marathon training. I assume you mean something else.

clivers
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:02 PM
OMG I just had the most unusual image of LSD training...or was that a flashback...;)

jenm
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:04 PM
the only thing that comes to mind when you say LSD is long-slow-distance, something I do when marathon training. I assume you mean something else.

That is what I meant.

Janet
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:29 PM
First, look in Jimmy's book.

Ideally, you want to do a lot of long (over an hour) viogorous/forward walks on both soft and hard footing.

Then you want to build up to long trots, on both hard and soft footing.

The point is to strengthen the bones and joints (hard footing) and the soft tissues (soft footing). But you need to build up to it GRADUALLY.

If your only choice is arena work or trailering out, I would probably compromise on doing a lot of cavaletti work (especially at the walk). But you need to be REALLY careful not to do too much too soon.

If there are farm roads or driveways (or quiet public roads) I'd do a lot of walking (and later trotting) on them too.

The thing to remember is that small amounts of work on hard footing strengthen bones and joints. But too much work on hard footing damages bones and joints.

Similarly, small amounts of work on soft footing strengthen tendons and ligaments. But too much work on softfooting damages tendons and ligaments.

jenm
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:39 PM
First, look in Jimmy's book.


Which book?


Thank you Janet!!

rizzodm
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:45 PM
OMG I just had the most unusual image of LSD training...or was that a flashback...;)

LOL, make sure it's in a sugar cube for horse:lol:

Dawn

Zephyr
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:50 PM
Which book?


Thank you Janet!!

I'm guessing she meant "Training the Three-Day Event Horse and Rider," by James C. Wofford. It's a classic, must-have for any eventer's shelf! I think I heard you can get the best deals on Amazon. It may be out of print and very expensive in some places.

RunForIt
Jan. 20, 2010, 03:52 PM
small amounts of work on soft footing strengthen tendons and ligaments. But too much work on softfooting damages tendons and ligaments.

could you say more about "small amount of work", Janet, in terms of time? Many thanks! :cool:

Janet
Jan. 20, 2010, 04:05 PM
could you say more about "small amount of work", Janet, in terms of time? Many thanks! :cool:
It all depends on how fit the bones, joints, ligaments and tendons are to start with. And you need to check them after every ride. And you need to be paying attention to your horse as you ride, so you notice when he gets tired. When you get to speed work, you need to "push through" "tired". But with LSD you need ot stop before "tired" or "uncomfortable"".
Tired" is when injuries happen.

It also depends on how soft (sand vs deep mud) or how hard (dirt/gravel driveway vs asphalt vs concrete).

But to be conservative, with an uninjured horse coming back from complete layoff, I'd start with 15 min.

LaraNSpeedy
Jan. 20, 2010, 09:53 PM
Actually, when eventing, I prefer a shot of vodka.

=)

Kairoshorses
Jan. 20, 2010, 10:28 PM
I spoke to Mary D'Arcy about this at our last adult clinic. In Ireland, says she, they ride on the roads 40+ minutes about 3-5 times a week, and add a 20 minute dressage/jumping/flat/whatever to that. So if the horse is hot, they walk (45min) then ride (20 min); if the horse is sluggy, they ride for 20 mins. then walk on the roads.

They start out walking on the roads, and later might do some trotting. It's a good, "going home" walk the whole time, though you can do some long and low, too.

I THINK she said that we should be doing that for three months before an event. But I would need to check my notes.

I love Jimmy Wofford's book, but do note that it's for a TB. Someone posted a version here for WB's. I bet we could find it in the archives.

Shrunk "N" Da Wash
Jan. 20, 2010, 10:37 PM
Two words... Trot + Hills :)

Meredith Clark
Jan. 20, 2010, 10:46 PM
No help on training but your pictures are SO cute!

You got a mare from auction and she turned out to be preggers?

too cute

edited to ad: I see from your other posts that he is a mule! I didn't want to assume that if he wasn't and offend :)

clivers
Jan. 21, 2010, 06:36 AM
What a great story!!!! Adorable pics!

In_
Jan. 21, 2010, 07:03 AM
Hi Jenm - how exciting! Welcome to the recognized dark side : )

To be honest, chances are that your horse will be fit enough for BN with typical riding, especially is she is not a cold blooded type (Draft, halfy etc). I think you should start some conditioning work, if for nothing else to start getting your 'legs' for higher levels - but - you also need to be careful not to make your horse too fit! " I want to keep my horse as healthy and strong as possible" and *within reason!* A TB that is competitively fit for training or prelim will not be a fun ride for beginner novice.

So my suggestions are as follows: Lots and lots of walking. Some trotting. Find hills. Go out and actively trail ride (even if you trailer out) at least once a week. Enjoy!

Ajierene
Jan. 21, 2010, 08:52 AM
So, here is a specific question:

Last weekend the weather was really nice so I went out to Fair Hill and rode along the red trail. This is a 2.5 mile trail with hills, some stream crossings, etc. No major slopes, but up and down. We mostly walked, but did some trotting - very little because the trail was mostly muddy.

Would that be the type of start to a long slow distance training regime? Would you walk that once a week for four weeks, then add in more trotting and more times a week or would you start with two or three times a week at a walk or do something completely different?

Eventer55
Jan. 21, 2010, 09:07 AM
OMG I just had the most unusual image of LSD training...or was that a flashback...;)

Is part of the training "tune in, turn on and drop out?"

RIP Timothy. . .:D

jenm
Jan. 21, 2010, 03:53 PM
No help on training but your pictures are SO cute!

You got a mare from auction and she turned out to be preggers?

too cute

edited to ad: I see from your other posts that he is a mule! I didn't want to assume that if he wasn't and offend :)

Haha, thanks! My mare was on a feedlot in Washington and I am in CA. I found her while I was browsing classifieds and looking for a gelding who had "been there done that" and would safely pack me around while I got back into eventing after a 15 year break. However, my heart ruled over my head when I saw this photo and learned she would be headed to slaughter in Canada, and the rest is history:

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/linda.jpg

Don't worry about offending me, Meredith, I didn't realize he was a mule when he was born, I thought he was a horse foal with unusually long ears! :yes: :eek: :D

Here is what he looks like now, as a 3 year old:

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/HunterringposeCR-1-1.jpg

Someday he will be taking me around a x-country course as well but sadly, we can only run in un-recognized events.

If I had known this horse was with child, I would not have taken her, so I guess some things happen for a reason!

dixiedolphin
Jan. 21, 2010, 04:16 PM
Is part of the training "tune in, turn on and drop out?"

RIP Timothy. . .:D

I think it also involved Kool-Aid. And the Grateful Dead. :lol:

Bobthehorse
Jan. 21, 2010, 05:10 PM
The point is to strengthen the bones and joints (hard footing) and the soft tissues (soft footing).

See, I have always been taught that hard footing increases tendons and ligament strength, not soft. And I have never gone out of my way to train on soft footing, but hacking out 3-5 times a week usually gets me on a wide variety. I think riding in the arena is probably enough soft footing work.

We spend our winters roading once a week for an hour to an hour and a half (for the hard to fit N horses and the T and up horses). The ratio of walk to trot depends on the horse and its fitness needs. It works out well to do it over the winter when we dont have a place for speed training or hill work. Also, working in the deep snow is gold. By the time the snow is gone and we can use the fields, they are nicely legged up and ready for the speed. We then stop the roading when the fields dry up (we have clay) because they spend all day on fairly hard ground. Plus then add long walks and trots in the fields/woods and hillwork.

wolfmare
Jan. 22, 2010, 04:58 AM
That baby at three is truly one of the nicest looking mules I have seen. His daddy musta been a rock star!