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View Full Version : My horse was just diagnosed with restricted airway disease...



Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 18, 2010, 02:30 PM
We still have a long rode ahead seeing if we can get it under control or not, but either way, she can not go back to school with me because her being there is what caused it and I dont want to risk taking her back and making it worse... Where is this going to leave me in my and her training? I can still ride while I am at school (IHSA team), but she, if she gets better, will only be ridden two weekends a month until summer break (May) through september. I have two years of school left and she will almost be 10 when I graduate... How bad is this going to throw off my plans of being a trainer? I def dont want to take my other horse to school with me because I dont want her to end up with the same thing...
I am incredilby disappointed...

deltawave
Jan. 18, 2010, 02:34 PM
How bad is this going to throw off my plans of being a trainer?

Sorry to hear about your horse, but your plans of being a trainer are not subject to what happens with one animal. If that is your goal, you can make it happen with any horse and all horses that you have the chance to work with.

Does the vet think the other horse is very likely to develop the same problem if she's in the same environment? Is there anything you could change there to make it better? Are the other horses at school having breathing problems?

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 18, 2010, 02:40 PM
All the other horses are fine at school, but my other mare (sapphire) already has a history of respitory problems. I have never seen them, but her previous owner said she always had to wet down her hay... I cant chance it. I can compete in the summers, but it will be limited to that (when I start competing again. I am taking the year off to learn.. which will mostly come from books now!)

BigRuss1996
Jan. 18, 2010, 03:31 PM
So sorry to hear about your horse. I just lost one of mine to COPD this past fall it was heartbreaking watching his decline he was 13 and developed it after having to be on a years stall rest after getting cast and injuring his hock requiring major surgery. Don't chance it with your other horse if she has a prior breathing issue it isn't worth it.
As others have said it won't effect your ability to become a trainer but it will effect your future with that particular horse. The disease is not curable but can be very manageable depending on how advanced it is.
As far as options....you could 1) lease the horse out while you are at school so you both keep learning. 2) Just give her time off and she'll be rusty and not so fit but not anything you couldn't pick back up later. Also depending on what level you are competing 10 isn't that old. Only other option I can think of is can you find a barn near your school that might be a better environment so you can keep riding.

visorvet
Jan. 18, 2010, 03:57 PM
Assuming this is recurrent airway obstruction (heaves) and not restrictive lung disease (different animal), you may still have additional options. It is always best to take these horses out of the problematic environment, but when that is not possible or practical most can be treated very successfully with inhalant meds like those used to manage humans with asthma. Not cheap, but typically very effective. Another thing that works for many horses, whether or not the whole environment can be changed, is to eliminate hay from the diet. So if you were up to some added expense and your barn managers are up for some unique management strategies, she may still do well in that environment. Also, have you explored 24/7 turnout at school, just coming in for grooming/riding? Your vet may have already spoken with you about these options, or you may have tried them already, but I thought I would comment because I treat a lot of horses with this issue.

Best of luck to you both.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 18, 2010, 04:03 PM
Assuming this is recurrent airway obstruction (heaves) and not restrictive lung disease (different animal), you may still have additional options. It is always best to take these horses out of the problematic environment, but when that is not possible or practical most can be treated very successfully with inhalant meds like those used to manage humans with asthma. Not cheap, but typically very effective. Another thing that works for many horses, whether or not the whole environment can be changed, is to eliminate hay from the diet. So if you were up to some added expense and your barn managers are up for some unique management strategies, she may still do well in that environment. Also, have you explored 24/7 turnout at school, just coming in for grooming/riding? Your vet may have already spoken with you about these options, or you may have tried them already, but I thought I would comment because I treat a lot of horses with this issue.

Best of luck to you both.


She was on 24/7 turnout... her going back to school isnt an option. I want her to be happy and she is happy at home. Its a much safer environment for her.