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Phaxxton
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:42 AM
Can anyone give me an approximate cost of having a covered round pen built? I know it depends on location, materials, design, whether the ground needs to be leveled and prepared, etc. I'm looking for ball park figures. If anyone could share what they paid to put up a covered round pen and what that included, I'd be grateful.

I'm also curious if people did any or all of the work themselves.

shortbusgeek
Jan. 14, 2010, 11:53 AM
As you said, there's quite a few factors involved. I haven't put one up yet, but I'm researching options. One I found on FarmTek is $22,665, though I would think I could find something similar cheaper. Of course that doesn't include the footing or anything. I'm assuming you're wanting to start from scratch, right? How big are you wanting to go? 40, 50, 60 feet? What part of the country are you in? (How much prep work is going to need to go into putting in a good footing... can you just lay M10 on top of hard red clay that's just beneath the topsoil, or are you going to need to put some larger crushed stone down first?)

http://www.farmtek.com/farm/supplies/prod1;ft1_tension_fabric_buildings-ft1_horse_arenas_1;pg106659_106659W.html

Phaxxton
Jan. 14, 2010, 01:35 PM
Thanks. I thought I put it in the OP, but apparently I was dreaming that. Ideally, I'm looking for a 60' round pen.

It will be for a farm in the southeast, but exact area is not yet decided. I am trying to get ballpark figures on various improvements we may need to make so we can better budget when we start looking at farms in the next 12 - 14 months.

I know it's nearly impossible to answer such a general question, so any experiences people have would be greatly appreciated.

MistyBlue
Jan. 14, 2010, 03:06 PM
I'm guessing that building one is a helluva lot cheaper than buying one.
I checked out those Merry Go Round Pens...a cute company name that's very apt since they do look like a carousel when finished.
Got a quote from them...prices start at $35k for a 60'...site work and footing not included! :eek:
I'm no contractor, but how expensive can it be to put up 4' kick walls in a circle, extend posts higher and add a roof? I know wood isn't cheap, but there's isn't close to $35k of wood in a 60' round pen. Not even if the wood was teak.

shortbusgeek
Jan. 14, 2010, 03:19 PM
My thoughts exactly Misty. That's probably the route we'll end up going is building our own. It really just depends on how creative we want to get. My wife left her engineering job to start the farm, so I'll leave the design totally up to her if we do build it ourselves. But my preliminary thoughts have even tossed around the idea of using bamboo poles for the trusses, as my dad has a big growth of bamboo that we can cut from any time we want.

As for covering the bamboo or wood or whatever we build the trusses out of, being in the Atlanta area of Georgia we don't have really all that much snow to deal with... a couple inches a year at most. The main things we have to worry about are wind (depending on location), falling pine trees and hail. I've seen golf ball size hail plenty of times from spring through fall. I certainly don't want a big piece ripping through a fabric roof and hitting a horse or person on the head. Same goes with any thin metals or fiberglass based roofs like ondura. Whatever the roofing material is, it has to stand up to hail.

MistyBlue
Jan. 14, 2010, 03:24 PM
I'd think 1/2" plywood with asphalt roof shingles would hold up fine to most hail. (again, I'm not contractor though) I'd think with fabric roof and enclosed sides it might get pretty hot in there in your climate? Maybe not with above the kick walls open though. And maybe it situated under trees...it's a lot smaller than a full sized indoor.

Phaxxton
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:09 PM
I'm guessing that building one is a helluva lot cheaper than buying one.
I checked out those Merry Go Round Pens...a cute company name that's very apt since they do look like a carousel when finished.
Got a quote from them...prices start at $35k for a 60'...site work and footing not included! :eek:
I'm no contractor, but how expensive can it be to put up 4' kick walls in a circle, extend posts higher and add a roof? I know wood isn't cheap, but there's isn't close to $35k of wood in a 60' round pen. Not even if the wood was teak.

I was thinking the exact same thing.

Even if we didn't do it ourselves (which is still a possibility), I do think we could probably pay a carpenter a lot less than $35k to build one... DH is more than capable of designing one.

Phaxxton
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:12 PM
it's a lot smaller than a full sized indoor.

I'm looking at it as just a place for longeing that is completely separate from the indoor and outdoor arenas. I want to avoid longeing in the riding arenas.

MistyBlue
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:23 PM
There are ways to figure out exactly how much wood/supplies are necessary to complete the structure...I think there's a few online sites that help with that. Then you can price that out and see what the material cost is. Then figure out if the budget works with hiring full time builders, a subcontractor or two or doing it yourself.
If you can do some or all of it yourself that has to be a big savings. I know my hubby and I aren't handy at all with stuff like that...I wouldn't feel safe inside any building that I built, LOL! But if we *were* handy at building...well, we could save a buttload of money! :yes:
It has to be more convenient to have a separate covered lungeing place.
I had seen that the commercial builders for these had 80' round pens and I was thinking that might be a decent size for some light winter/icy weather riding. But after seeing the cost of the 60' basic model...I figured I could stick with grippy shoes on the horses, extra layers on me and just not riding during downpours or sleet. :winkgrin:
Maybe it would be easier to design, build and put a roof on a 60x60square building and just add interior kickboards to the corners to make the interior open area round? And if enclosed...those closed off corners might make decent small extra storage spots for stuff? One can never have too much storage. ;)

shortbusgeek
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:24 PM
Yep, the plywood and asphalt shingles is what most people use on their houses around here. But being that we're trying to be as eco friendly about it as possible, I'm not sure that's the route we want to go. There's a lot of chemicals and petroleum products in asphalt shingles. If we end up going the shingle route, it'll probably be cedar shake shingles or something along those lines... something that's renewable and can be sustainably harvested. :-)

Phaxxton
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:28 PM
MistyBlue -- great thought on seeing if a square structure would be easier / cheaper to have built than a round one. It doesn't need to be fully enclosed, and I think I'd prefer some daylight between the kickboards and the roof. I did want a roof to make it somewhat all-weather, though.

I'm not sure we'd do the roof building part ourselves, though DH is more than qualified to design it. I'm certain we could do the kick boards, though.

FWIW, I absolutely love this one: http://www.lorandstables.com/roundpen.jpg

crosscreeksh
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:36 PM
Another approach to consider. A 60x60 pole barn - roof only if you are in the right place and put up your half walls and round the corners with boards or gate panels. Square is always cheaper to build than round!! We added a 24x72 loafing shed to our broodmare motel for around $5,000!! Look in a farm magazine for builder "specials". We get one monthly.

Rabtfarm
Jan. 14, 2010, 05:32 PM
I am a builder and I agree with Crosscreek that you would want to look at a square building rather than a round one if you are looking to save money. Most buildings will be fairly strong if you can build a triangle: 2 rafters and a collar tie..it gets harder when you try to frame that in a circle. Look closely at the roof framing of those round pens like the Merry Go Round...some engineering was needed and used there or you will have something that will fall down when the snow load or wind load hits. Also bear in mind that you all will of course want 60 feet of clear span(or you wouldn't be doing too much longeing in amongst the forest of support posts) so that adds to your truss costs. And only if I take the labor out of my 24X46 barn with a metal roof would I get down to $5000 cost...

MistyBlue
Jan. 14, 2010, 05:51 PM
Oh I like that covered pen Phaxxton. :yes: With something like that you can maybe add some tarp or canvas rolls as "shades" in case you have windy and rainy days...keep the water from blowing in on your footing when rolled down.
I like the observation deck on it. Love a metal roof, but that looks difficult and expensive to try doing.
Here's the type I had priced out a few years back:
http://www.merrygoroundpens.com/
Haven't looked at the site in ages, and have to say that boy howdy did they go way up in price! Now their standard 62' covered round pen starts at $78,500!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :eek:
IMO that's absolutely insane! Their roof is more steep...but still a ridiculous price. :no:

rideagoldenpony
Jan. 14, 2010, 09:44 PM
My husband REALLY wants a cover for our round pen, and just got a price on materials for a 50' one* -- approximately $9k. I didn't think that was too bad. We'll probably do that over the summer.

*That's roofing, trusses and supports -- not sides. We would use panels and keep the sides open.

DLee
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:28 PM
I know someone who did this, I believe it cost them between 15 and 20k doing a lot of work themselves. The major cost was having to span that distance.