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forestergirl99
Jan. 13, 2010, 10:46 AM
I've been trying to find information on how to get an equestrian scholarship and what scholarships are available, but I can't find anything really useful. Do you guys know where I could find some information? :confused:

forestergirl99
Jan. 14, 2010, 09:26 AM
bump

heartinrye
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:41 AM
The NCAA offers scholarships for D1 Varsity Equestrian. Visit varsityequestrian.com to see which schools offer scholarships, but to get one now you really need to be competing at or above 3'6 and doing very well in tough competition.

loshad
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:51 AM
You can also check out your show association. I know VHSA offers a scholarship for members.

Google is definitely your friend (and would have been my first stop) -- varsityscholarships.com was the first thing that popped up when I did a search. The first three sites all looked quite good and reputable with a ton of pertinent information.

Good luck!

forestergirl99
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:57 AM
You can also check out your show association. I know VHSA offers a scholarship for members.

Google is definitely your friend (and would have been my first stop) -- varsityscholarships.com was the first thing that popped up when I did a search. The first three sites all looked quite good and reputable with a ton of pertinent information.

Good luck!

What did u google? I googled a bunch of different things and couldn't find much.

loshad
Jan. 14, 2010, 11:06 AM
Equestrian scholarships.

Hot Soup
Jan. 14, 2010, 12:07 PM
The NCAA offers scholarships for D1 Varsity Equestrian. Visit varsityequestrian.com to see which schools offer scholarships, but to get one now you really need to be competing at or above 3'6 and doing very well in tough competition.

This kills me. If you are in a position where you have had opportunity to prove you are very competitive at 3'6 or above, I'm thinking you don't need that scholarship money.

slp
Jan. 14, 2010, 12:14 PM
This kills me. If you are in a position where you have had opportunity to prove you are very competitive at 3'6 or above, I'm thinking you don't need that scholarship money.

Athletic scholarships and need based scholarships are two totally different things.
To the original poster; do a search here on COTH about varsity equestrian, NCAA equestrian, etc. and you will find out a lot of information that has been discussed extensively.

KnKShowmom
Jan. 14, 2010, 12:36 PM
You also might want to check out the Equestrian Talent Searches:

http://beckettrunriding.com/equestrian_talent_search

SaturdayNightLive
Jan. 14, 2010, 12:37 PM
This kills me. If you are in a position where you have had opportunity to prove you are very competitive at 3'6 or above, I'm thinking you don't need that scholarship money.

Division 1 athletics is supposed to be about the best of the best. It isn't a charity. The fact that our sport requires a certain amount of money to be successful is of no interest to the NCAA.

chunky munky
Jan. 14, 2010, 12:55 PM
There are many scholarships offered from many smaller organizations. Some go unclaimed. Many of the breed organizations ofer scholarship $ as well as regional horse show groups and PHA's. Do some sleuthing and you can find way more than you think.

chunky munky
Jan. 14, 2010, 01:00 PM
Another site you may find some info is www.equestriancollegerecruiter.com They seem to be doing a pretty good job as an information source.

PineTreeFarm
Jan. 14, 2010, 01:08 PM
Take a look at the National PHA website.
http://www.nationalpha.com/purpose.html
They have a scholarship fund as do some of the local chapters.
http://www.nationalpha.com/chapters.html

Here is some information from a local chapter
http://www.lipha.org/scholarshipprogr.html

The LIPHA awarded 5 scholarships last year

Hot Soup
Jan. 14, 2010, 03:04 PM
Division 1 athletics is supposed to be about the best of the best. It isn't a charity. The fact that our sport requires a certain amount of money to be successful is of no interest to the NCAA.

How about the riders who have the talent to be very successful but not the financial means to compete at those levels. By limiting the pool to those with both the talent & big money combo, they are excluding a heck of a lot of talented riders.

Anyways, I still think the fundamental purpose of any scholarship (merit-based, need-based, etc.) is about opportunity for education. In this case, the pool for a free college education is being limited to students who already have finances in place (an assumption I'm making based on what I know of the costs associated with being a top junior rider in this sport); I just think a huge opportunity like that could be better appointed.

chunky munky
Jan. 14, 2010, 03:54 PM
I know plenty of young riders that have gotten on NCAA teams without being heiresses or natonal champions. But yes, you must ride well. Stop whining and go out and promote yourself to the teams.

Tollriffic
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:33 PM
How about the riders who have the talent to be very successful but not the financial means to compete at those levels. By limiting the pool to those with both the talent & big money combo, they are excluding a heck of a lot of talented riders.

Anyways, I still think the fundamental purpose of any scholarship (merit-based, need-based, etc.) is about opportunity for education. In this case, the pool for a free college education is being limited to students who already have finances in place (an assumption I'm making based on what I know of the costs associated with being a top junior rider in this sport); I just think a huge opportunity like that could be better appointed.

When a school is funding a D1 Equestrian Team they expect results and many times the coaches are under a lot of pressure to produce said results. Just because a rider has been lucky enough to have the funds to compete at the 3'6" level should in no way make them less deserving of a scholarship. Talented riders without a long show record can still get on the teams as walk ons or through open try outs with the opportunity for scholarship money in later years.

I was recruited and am on a partial scholarship as a freshman at a D1 school. While I was fortunate enough to have a lot of opportunities as a junior I also worked my butt off riding everything I could and helping my trainers on the ground to get here. In no way do I think those opportunities should exclude me from being able to earn a scholarship for something I happen to have some talent at. It just happens to be that an extensive show record proves how useful you could be to the team and gives the coach an idea of what you're capable of under pressure in competition.

superpony123
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:37 PM
This kills me. If you are in a position where you have had opportunity to prove you are very competitive at 3'6 or above, I'm thinking you don't need that scholarship money.

that's where it gets tricky, because MOST well-known medal riders/jr hunter riders are NOT interested in NCAA because that means they cant do ANY money classes the year before they start riding for NCAA and they cant while they do NCAA. thats the killer for most well known/well funded jr riding stars.

so, it does root out a lot of kids who do alright and dont have tons of money. chances are, those kids dont have the funds for a fancy schmancy jr hunter that is worth putting in a money class -- these are the kids theyre getting on these teams.

Woodsperson
Jan. 14, 2010, 04:56 PM
NCAA equestrian is like any other NCAA sport; it is about recruiting the best-not about being fair to everyone. The football team is out recruiting top high school football players. You can try-out as a walk-on without that high school experience but you have to show an extraordinary talent to be selected for a team. It just makes sense that if the equestrian team is competing at 3'/3'6" that would recruit riders that have shown they have that ability. (That being said the NCAA teams recruit western and english flat riders).

Tollriffic
Jan. 14, 2010, 06:51 PM
that's where it gets tricky, because MOST well-known medal riders/jr hunter riders are NOT interested in NCAA because that means they cant do ANY money classes the year before they start riding for NCAA and they cant while they do NCAA. thats the killer for most well known/well funded jr riding stars.

so, it does root out a lot of kids who do alright and dont have tons of money. chances are, those kids dont have the funds for a fancy schmancy jr hunter that is worth putting in a money class -- these are the kids theyre getting on these teams.

That information is incorrect. There is no limit on money classes before they start riding for NCAA. Just that the money won cannot exceed the expenses. While they are on a team money can be won during the "off-season" which is usually the summer so long as it once again does not exceed expenses.

Tha Ridge
Jan. 14, 2010, 08:30 PM
How about the riders who have the talent to be very successful but not the financial means to compete at those levels. By limiting the pool to those with both the talent & big money combo, they are excluding a heck of a lot of talented riders.

Anyways, I still think the fundamental purpose of any scholarship (merit-based, need-based, etc.) is about opportunity for education. In this case, the pool for a free college education is being limited to students who already have finances in place (an assumption I'm making based on what I know of the costs associated with being a top junior rider in this sport); I just think a huge opportunity like that could be better appointed.

So, should a D1 football team choose a player who has the build and desire to play football but came from a school without a football program over a talented football player? Uh, no. :no:

Sorry, but a truly talented rider can make it without being a millionaire. Sounds like you're a lot of sour grapes.

mvp
Jan. 14, 2010, 09:30 PM
Equestrian scholarship strikes me that way.

Unlike the money it costs to "make" a recruitable football player, the funds spent on making the scholarship winning show rider could have just about paid for the four years at college.

Perhaps that family might have paid their kid's way to college the old fashioned way, by saving for it? And does this constitute sour grapes?

I'll show you sour grapes!

All you whippersnappers who want scholarships because you worked damned hard showing, I believe you! You *did* work hard, whatever financial support your parents contributed to your success. But the kid with the job whose paycheck helps cover his momma's rent worked hard, too. By what measure would you compare your "results" and consider yourself more deserving?

Tha Ridge
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:23 PM
Equestrian scholarship strikes me that way.

Unlike the money it costs to "make" a recruitable football player, the funds spent on making the scholarship winning show rider could have just about paid for the four years at college.

Perhaps that family might have paid their kid's way to college the old fashioned way, by saving for it? And does this constitute sour grapes?

I'll show you sour grapes!

All you whippersnappers who want scholarships because you worked damned hard showing, I believe you! You *did* work hard, whatever financial support your parents contributed to your success. But the kid with the job whose paycheck helps cover his momma's rent worked hard, too. By what measure would you compare your "results" and consider yourself more deserving?

No wonder people think equestrian is a joke as a sport. I love how equestrians complain that we're not respected as real athletes - this is exactly why.

So, because I ride well and my parents had money both a) pay for me to show, and b) pay for me to go to the college of my choice, I shouldn't have been eligible for an NCAA athletic scholarship based solely upon my riding abilities?

Note that a school's endowment for merit and academic scholarships is a very separate thing from the money they receive for athletic scholarships.

justathought
Jan. 14, 2010, 10:45 PM
that's where it gets tricky, because MOST well-known medal riders/jr hunter riders are NOT interested in NCAA because that means they cant do ANY money classes the year before they start riding for NCAA and they cant while they do NCAA. thats the killer for most well known/well funded jr riding stars.

so, it does root out a lot of kids who do alright and dont have tons of money. chances are, those kids dont have the funds for a fancy schmancy jr hunter that is worth putting in a money class -- these are the kids theyre getting on these teams.

Not so sure that this is accurate - look at the names on some of the top NCAA teams and you will see a number of the top medal/jr. hunter riders - Perhaps some of the top juniors with really substantial funds are passing it up, but just under that tier a lot are going NCAA. A full ride at college is still a significant incentive for a number of well off riders

Hot Soup
Jan. 15, 2010, 12:13 AM
So, because I ride well and my parents had money both a) pay for me to show, and b) pay for me to go to the college of my choice, I shouldn't have been eligible for an NCAA athletic scholarship based solely upon my riding abilities?


Right, that's what I said :rolleyes:

I just think the scholarship award criteria could use some reworking if it is true that you need a highly successful 3'6+ show career to be considered. I don't know if this is true or not, but sounds like it is. It would be nice if the criteria were not so financial dependent. Realistic? Maybe not.

forestergirl99
Jan. 15, 2010, 12:58 AM
Another site you may find some info is www.equestriancollegerecruiter.com They seem to be doing a pretty good job as an information source.

Thank you so much! This website was great! :)

JumpRoo
Jan. 16, 2010, 10:55 PM
1

LeeB10
Jan. 17, 2010, 02:17 PM
I am sure getting an equestrian scholarship from any school will also involve that school looking at your gpa, how rigorous your academic career has been, and community involvement. A good equestrian record is important but so is everything else. Say you want to go to Brown and be on their team - a good equestrian record is important but so will the other things be important as well. If you have a 4.0 unweighted, a 4.4 weighted, (thru junior year) did AP Chem, AP Physics, Trig, Calc, etc. etc., worked as a docent at a local museum, held a summer job, went to the local JC and did some classes, volunteered at a local animal shelter, and were competitive at equestrian sports some school is going to offer you a scholarship.

Tha Ridge
Jan. 17, 2010, 02:48 PM
I am sure getting an equestrian scholarship from any school will also involve that school looking at your gpa, how rigorous your academic career has been, and community involvement. A good equestrian record is important but so is everything else. Say you want to go to Brown and be on their team - a good equestrian record is important but so will the other things be important as well. If you have a 4.0 unweighted, a 4.4 weighted, (thru junior year) did AP Chem, AP Physics, Trig, Calc, etc. etc., worked as a docent at a local museum, held a summer job, went to the local JC and did some classes, volunteered at a local animal shelter, and were competitive at equestrian sports some school is going to offer you a scholarship.

Brown, like all Ivies, does not offer athletic scholarships.

mvp
Jan. 17, 2010, 03:14 PM
Not so sure that this is accurate - look at the names on some of the top NCAA teams and you will see a number of the top medal/jr. hunter riders - Perhaps some of the top juniors with really substantial funds are passing it up, but just under that tier a lot are going NCAA. A full ride at college is still a significant incentive for a number of well off riders

Well, I don't think the awarding of NCAA scholarships is what gives equestrians sports "joke status" in the collective public mind. The common misperception that "the horse does all the work" probably plays a larger part. The slightly more truthful notion that riders can buy their way to glory by putting the right horse underneath them contributes, too.

Insofar as they exist, of course you CAN get an NCAA scholarship, whatever your ability to pay. My point was that looking at why someone might wish that the well-heeled horsie set simply put some of their showing budget into a savings account ear-marked for college has to do with how much closer that family (as opposed to that of the poor but talented basketball player) might come to paying their own way.

In short, and perhaps something we gain from a college education, is the ability to look beyond our own situation and to feel some responsibility toward how things go for everyone.

My alma mater admitted Tiger Woods who stayed for a year before bailing and turning pro. The cost of bringing him or someone else to The Farm aside, that spot in his incoming class could have been used by someone else who was actually there for the education.

I suppose this is a larger complaint with the awarding of NCAA scholarships for reasons beyond an ability and desire to get a college education. I understand why universities offer them. My point is that if you can pay, why not? It seems the right thing to do.

chunky munky
Jan. 17, 2010, 03:59 PM
Thank you so much! This website was great! :)

You are welcome. I believe they will be participating in our College Night Recruiting Dinner @ the Old Dominion Horse Show this year.

LeeB10
Jan. 17, 2010, 04:10 PM
http://www.collegescholarships.org/scholarships/sports/equestrian.htm


Brown is listed on this site as giving either full or partial NCAA scholarships - don't know about the other ivies as my daughter isn't going to an ivy.

Tollriffic
Jan. 17, 2010, 04:19 PM
http://www.collegescholarships.org/scholarships/sports/equestrian.htm


Brown is listed on this site as giving either full or partial NCAA scholarships - don't know about the other ivies.

Equestrian has varsity status at Brown but they compete in IHSA

Tha Ridge
Jan. 17, 2010, 04:20 PM
http://www.collegescholarships.org/scholarships/sports/equestrian.htm


Brown is listed on this site as giving either full or partial NCAA scholarships - don't know about the other ivies.

They are a Divison I program, yes, but they do not give athletic scholarships.

From the Ivy Group Agreement:
"The Ivy Group Agreement established the core tenet that an applicant's ability to play on a team would not influence admissions decisions: The members of the Group reaffirm their prohibition of athletic scholarships. Athletes shall be admitted as students and awarded financial aid only on the basis of the same academic standards and economic need as are applied to all other students."

Albion
Jan. 17, 2010, 05:11 PM
They are a Divison I program, yes, but they do not give athletic scholarships.

From the Ivy Group Agreement:
"The Ivy Group Agreement established the core tenet that an applicant's ability to play on a team would not influence admissions decisions: The members of the Group reaffirm their prohibition of athletic scholarships. Athletes shall be admitted as students and awarded financial aid only on the basis of the same academic standards and economic need as are applied to all other students."

They don't OFFICIALLY give athletic scholarships, but the various students I knew who were recruited for their athletic skills certainly were not given scholarships because of (a) economic need or (b) because they were going to set academia aflame with their brilliant (academic) work.

Tha Ridge
Jan. 17, 2010, 05:23 PM
They don't OFFICIALLY give athletic scholarships, but the various students I knew who were recruited for their athletic skills certainly were not given scholarships because of (a) economic need or (b) because they were going to set academia aflame with their brilliant (academic) work.

Right, but, they were also not given an official NCAA statement of athletic financial aid like I was given, or athletes at other universities are given.

RoyalTRider
Jan. 17, 2010, 06:18 PM
Also, just because a rider has the funds to be a top junior, it does not mean the family has $40,000+ for the student PLUS the means to finance the horse and riding career through college. In many sports, the top schools are also the top overall schools nationwide. These are very expensive educations. Despite riding for most of my life, I took out loans for college when I choose an expensive one. Because of that, I passed on riding for or at the school and committed my time to a sport that could give me some money.

mvp
Jan. 17, 2010, 10:21 PM
Also, just because a rider has the funds to be a top junior, it does not mean the family has $40,000+ for the student PLUS the means to finance the horse and riding career through college. In many sports, the top schools are also the top overall schools nationwide. These are very expensive educations. Despite riding for most of my life, I took out loans for college when I choose an expensive one. Because of that, I passed on riding for or at the school and committed my time to a sport that could give me some money.

I'm not sure you were arguing hardship for the family who can't afford both tuition and continued riding at a top level. Is that right?

The problem is that the first $40K a year must go to riding, with college tuition taking a back seat? The "solution," therefore is to make sure this well-off family can continue as they were, thanks to a scholarship?

I truly don't get the bit about the loans. This doesn't mean borrowing to finance a riding career while in school right? If you mean, instead, that you chose an expensive school, had to curtail your riding and pursue another sport, then all I can say is "welcome to how the other half lives."

hype
Jan. 19, 2010, 01:00 PM
My alma mater admitted Tiger Woods who stayed for a year before bailing and turning pro. The cost of bringing him or someone else to The Farm aside, that spot in his incoming class could have been used by someone else who was actually there for the education.

Your alma mater got enough publicity etc from having Tiger there one year to further endow a lot of other things on campus and probably helped the golf program more than you realize.

Sports are big business. Having the premier athletes AT your school whether or not they actually graduate or stay four years is a big deal.

If it was truly a huge deal to have athletes for four years then the schools would be pushing harder to keep the athletes there AND make sure that they left with a diploma.

For example in basketball, Greg Oden was always going to be a "one and done" player. He had to pass time for a year before he could play in the NBA. This is a law with the NBA, the NFL requires two years after high school before you may be drafted.

There were schools lined up all over the nation to have the opportunity to have Greg play for them. He chose Ohio State and led them to their first NCAA finals in decades.

Studies have shown that when a school has a strong athletic program and are winning national championships, alumni giving increases, applications increase (resulting in a student body with higher GPA's, and test scores), positive feelings about the school increase and national ranking increase as a direct result of the national championship.

If equestrian sports wants to get on the map, then we have to have our best of the best going to college and riding. Yes, that will mean that those who can't afford to go the best shows might not be chosen but the same can be said for other costly sports like tennis and golf as well.

JAGold
Jan. 20, 2010, 07:41 AM
Athletic scholarships in all sports are awarded to students who have the potential to help the team win. Of course, there's some judgement involved in that -- coaches have to make sure that they develop younger athletes, fill all positions, and create a successful team chemistry. That means that raw achievement in competitive sports might not be the only criteria -- in soccer, they might look beyond goals and assists, a quarterback might be evaluated on more than his passer rating. But ultimately, what matters is the athlete's ability to contribute to the team's competitive success. Can you imagine a D1 school giving a scholarship to a kid who was a really hard worker, had been teaching swimming lessons at the local YMCA for years, but had never had the opportunity to swim competitively?

I don't think that standard should be any different for equestrian scholarships than those in any other sport. That's not to say I only value achievement, not effort or talent. It's also not to say that I don't recognize that different students have different opportunities to demonstrate proficiency before college. But I think athletic scholarships should be awarded for demonstrated athletic proficiency. There should be other mechanisms for recognizing extraordinary effort, overcoming obstacles, and off-field mastery of a sport, and I think it's reasonable to debate whether the amount of money that colleges (especially public institutions) put into athletics. In the end, though, I want to see NCAA equestrian treated as a sport, which includes a focus on elite competitors and high level accomplishments that may limit opportunities for participation.

With that said, I hope that colleges with varsity programs also have club or recreational programs that enable students who don't make the varsity cut to participate. I hope that the growth and success of varsity horseback riding will make it possible for schools to increase funding for all who want to ride. However, I don't have a problem with making varsity spots, and scholarships for those spots, contingent on achievement. But there should be other funding opportunities that reward achievement of other sorts, including pursuit of excellence without much financial support.

Also, you are kidding yourself if you think that riding is the only sport where money plays a role. Parents spend thousands and thousands of dollars for soccer camps and swimming club fees and private tennis coaching and travel for tournaments in all competitive sports.

forestergirl99
Jan. 20, 2010, 10:47 AM
Also, you are kidding yourself if you think that riding is the only sport where money plays a role. Parents spend thousands and thousands of dollars for soccer camps and swimming club fees and private tennis coaching and travel for tournaments in all competitive sports.

I don't think that. This thread was about where to find information about equestrian scholarships, and it has kind of gotten off that topic. This thread is not about the money, ect of some kids that get scholarships. It's about where to find information about how to possibly get a scholarship, and what they are looking for in an applicant.