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myalter1
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:15 AM
I am an amateur who works a full time job and gets to the barn about 3-4 days a week, sometimes 5 days. After work, when I ride, I am EXHAUSTED. I mean, out of breath, tired. I trot around and then have to walk. I canter and have to walk. My horse is really quiet and I have to work hard to keep him engaged so that doesn't help. Man, I feel like a loser! It's like my muscles don't want to work when it is late in the evening and cold and there is no one at the barn but me!
Anyone else have this problem?

Lexus
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:22 AM
I'm tired!!! I work a demanding full time job and take care of the horses at home. My daughter rides but isn't quite old enough to be able to do everything herself. We have 3 showing so it's alot of work and motivation, especially in the winter. Sometimes I wonder if it's fun or not, but I love my horses.

caradino
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:27 AM
do you do any other exercise aside from riding?

it sounds like you could just be a bit out of shape. perhaps try taking up jogging, swimming, or biking on your non-riding days to help improve your cardio and leg strength. i noticed my riding stamina improve by leaps and bounds after i started running a few times a week.

and stopping for a coffee on the way to the barn helps, too! :winkgrin:

hasahorse
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:36 AM
Yes! I recently went back to being an amateur after working as a professional for a number of years. I am back at an office job plus I have two other part-time businesses, I work out 4 to 5 days a week, and get to the barn 3 days. I am tired all of the time! I am blissfully happy when I get to the barn, but the rest of the time, I just want to sleep! I know the seasons do have an effect on me, so I do have a Seasonal Affective Disorder light that I use. I swear, though, there are days that it just doesn't feel like it does anything!

Lkramer
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:37 AM
Caradino is right. That sounds like the last thing you want to do when you are exhausted, but from experience, it is true! Winter's short days, cold weather making us snuggle up by the fire, abundance of food over the holidays, etc. play into a depressed/hibernation mode. I was drinking coffee ALL DAY but never got going, so my doctor recommended I begin exercising in addition to riding. By running just for an hour a day, I sleep better at night, have more energy, and am drinking about 7 cups less coffee per day! My kidneys are thanking me.

ParadoxFarm
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:41 AM
Sometimes I wish I could just hibernate through winter. I hate it. And I tend to throw my diet out the window about Halloween, and don't start thinking about healthy eating until spring! That certainly doesn't help. Combine that with not doing my 4 to 5 days a week of walking 3 miles, and it's just bad. I can't wait for spring.

kellyb
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:41 AM
You sound like me - just out of shape. I need to start doing some kind of cardio but I really hate most things (home workout tapes, running, etc). I know working out isn't supposed to be fun but I don't think I should dread it either. :)

SaddleFitterVA
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:50 AM
If the tiredness is new, you might want to talk to your doctor about it. The only time I suffered from that sort of "out of breath" from riding was when I had an unknown bleeding ulcer and I was so severely anemic that I am lucky I didn't have a stroke or heart attack.

If it is not something new and just seasonal winter blahs, I was feeling exhausted in December and my chiro (who I see about 2x a year) recommended I take vitamin D. 5000 iu a day. I did a quick bit of research and found that it is not considered dangerous at that level if only taken for a couple of months (winter in my case) and so I started taking it, and that was amazing. If it was a placebo effect, I'll take it. Cheap and easy and it seems to be working.

Otherwise, you might want to integrate some cardio workouts into your week. I try to run 3x a week, usually only get in 2x. I also try to get in some weight lifting, but that is even less likely to happen than the running. If I cannot jog for 20 minutes, I figure my cardio needs work. I use a heart rate monitor to make sure I'm not cheating and my heart rate is usually in the 150-160 range during the hard parts. Walking won't do it for me.

Oh, I'm an adult amateur w/ a full time job, a barn with 6 horses (some boarders), but I currently have one horse boarded at an indoor, so only 5 at home, but I've realized it is more work to have one horse somewhere else because I have to pack all my clothes to ride on the way to or from work. I'll be riding 5x a week on the boarded one, and should be getting in at least 5 rides on the others at home, if the deep freeze would ever let up.

myalter1
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:08 PM
I KNOW i need to workout in between rides. But it's hard to find the time. I have a 6yr old daughter who rides, so some days when i don't ride, she does. She's tiny so i have to help her. When I get home i have to help her w/homework, etc. and never get to bed before 10PM. I don't ever recall feeling this winded and tired before, but maybe it's because I am 34 now. LOL
Do those of you who do cardio go the gym, or do something at home? I HATE working out at the gym and the closest one that is worth being a member at is 1/2 hr away. It just won't fit into my day.
I think i will call the dr. and get checked out just to be sure!
Glad I am not alone!

JumpWithPanache
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:26 PM
I can certainly empathize. I work for the DoD and many days are 9-10 hours at the office with another hour or two of work to be done at home. I'm at the barn seven days a week to clean my stall and before her injury layup, was riding at least 5x a week with one of those weekdays hauling down to a lesson and about half the weekends hauling to a show. On top of that I have three cats at home, a (now) husband and stepkids, which all adds up to plenty of laundry, dishes, grooming Himmies, litter boxes, feeding, cooking, etc before I ever get to sit down. Being on the go from 5 am to 10 pm is depressing and exhausting. So, with said horse being on layup, I've picked up a new activity. I am definintely NOT a gym girl... have tried many times before but I just don't like it. Instead I'm doing mixed martial arts. There's a fantastic combination of strength, coordination, and flexibility exercises built into their program. The exercises do bring my heart rate up without totally exhausting me. Since starting, I've found that I regain some energy, have a better outlook, and am happier. Another thing that's helped me perk up is drinking more water. I got a great little camel-back water bottle and I try to drink thorugh at least two bottles of water (which equals six glasses). I can definitely tell when I haven't been drinking water beause I feel totally parched and lethargic.

So that's what has helped me start to combat the winter blues and overall exhaustion. Hope you find something that works for you!

acking01
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:31 PM
Oh yeah, I am tired as well!! I work a 9-5 full time job and have a 3 hour commute (round trip) thanks to wonderful Houston traffic.

By the time I get to the barn, the lessons are finishing up and everyone is leaving. I don't feel comfortable being at the barn ALONE that late and having to lock up by myself. I have basically not ridden my horse in 3 weeks and I am feeling extremely guilty about it!!! UGH, I hate winter.

caradino
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:33 PM
I KNOW i need to workout in between rides. But it's hard to find the time. I have a 6yr old daughter who rides, so some days when i don't ride, she does. She's tiny so i have to help her. When I get home i have to help her w/homework, etc. and never get to bed before 10PM. I don't ever recall feeling this winded and tired before, but maybe it's because I am 34 now. LOL
Do those of you who do cardio go the gym, or do something at home? I HATE working out at the gym and the closest one that is worth being a member at is 1/2 hr away. It just won't fit into my day.
I think i will call the dr. and get checked out just to be sure!
Glad I am not alone!

i am also NOT a gym girl at all!! i cannot run on a treadmill for the life of me, it bores me to tears. i just take a run around my neighborhood or down into town... i love being outside and GOING somewhere, and i can just put on my ipod and shut out the world for a little while. i used to think i could "never" be a runner, but now that i've been doing it for 9 months or so, i really love it. it relaxes me and gives me more energy, improves my riding, there really is no downside! another thing i do is work on ab/core strengthening exercises in the evenings after work for about 20-30 min at least 3x a week during my 'de-tune' tv time. i feel fit and happy, depression is kept at bay, and i never have to set foot in a gym! :)

Go Fish
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:59 PM
You ARE tired. It DOES affect your riding, no two ways about it. When I was working 60+ hours a week I was tired when I rode, particularly during the week. Weekends were better, but not great.

I'm semi-retired now and the difference is amazing. Don't discount your level of stress and the affect it has on your body. Manage what you can...the horse doesn't care.

Save your best rides for the weekend and don't try to accomplish world peace during the week. Worked for me.

rugbygirl
Jan. 12, 2010, 01:17 PM
I am also tired.

Exercise helps. Nintendo Wii Fit is pretty awesome. I run on our treadmill with the "running" game, which makes it more fun, and then I do all the balance exercises. It berates you if you don't work out for a few days too, good motivation.

I used to love going to the gym, and I was a Jazzercise FIEND! But no Jazzercise here, and once we moved out to the acreage, I don't have time to go into town for a workout. My home program is going pretty well though.

Even brisk walking is good for cardiovascular health, if you really hate running. The Wii Fit has a Yoga training thing too, which I enjoy (and I HATED Yoga classes.) Running a full hour at a stretch (as someone above posted) is a big commitment, but even 20 minutes a day will make a significant difference in your overall health.

SaddleFitterVA
Jan. 12, 2010, 01:30 PM
A kiddo is a huge time suck. Although if you get dealt a good hand, there is a lovely period where they are ever-so-useful and helpful ... and then they go to college.

I had four years where I never had to mow my farm, because my son would take care of it! I would drag the fields and ring, but my son did almost all the mowing, in summer I paid him to do the barn too, my husband does the garden beds, and that was so nice. Then, my son left for college, and I had to remember how to WORK the mower! :lol:

The vitamin D was surprising at how much it energized me. I was seriously dragging in December. And started D and it was a fast improvement.

WB Mom
Jan. 12, 2010, 01:55 PM
I third the vitamin D! I take 4000 IU a day and it has really helped, and it's cheap! By the way, according to Merck, it would take 50,000 IU a day for a few months to cause toxicity in an adult.

farmgirl88
Jan. 12, 2010, 01:55 PM
im always the same way. i'm a full time college student who runs back and forth 20-30 min from school to work in between classes. i rarely have time to ride much at all when im in school. i've been riding since i was six and i've never taken a hiatus from riding like this. i've gained about 20-25 pounds and i've lost all of my muscle tone. i'm extremely depressed over it all. :(

FlashGordon
Jan. 12, 2010, 03:40 PM
If the tiredness is new, you might want to talk to your doctor about it. The only time I suffered from that sort of "out of breath" from riding was when I had an unknown bleeding ulcer and I was so severely anemic that I am lucky I didn't have a stroke or heart attack.

If it is not something new and just seasonal winter blahs, I was feeling exhausted in December and my chiro (who I see about 2x a year) recommended I take vitamin D. 5000 iu a day. I did a quick bit of research and found that it is not considered dangerous at that level if only taken for a couple of months (winter in my case) and so I started taking it, and that was amazing. If it was a placebo effect, I'll take it. Cheap and easy and it seems to be working.


Totally agree... if this is something new, it may be worth discussing with your doc. I was exhausted for several months-- chores like cleaning stalls and riding even for a short time were leaving me absolutely knackered. Kept pushing through it and eventually ended up in the hospital, with severe GI bleeding.

Ditto the Vitamin D as well, amazing how much better you feel on it. That and B12. If you are deficient, your doc can even give you B12 shots which I find much more effective than oral B12 vitamins.

Aside from that, make sure you are taking downtime for yourself! With a kid, a job, a life etc. sometimes we need some time to decompress.... don't pressure yourself to ride if you aren't feeling up to it. A few days OFF of riding here and there may be what you need, as opposed to trying to ride more.

myalter1
Jan. 12, 2010, 04:42 PM
Thanks guys. I do have a stressful job- hubby is an attorney and i do all of his paralegal/office stuff. Working for yourself has perks, but has stress too!!

I am going to try the vitamin D and make an appt. w/ the doc.

Also, i think Flashgordon reminded me of a great point - if i don't feel up to it, don't push it. The horse i lease is about 16 yrs old, has done IT ALL and packs my butt around the 3 foot (he's not easy, just very safe!)

The tiredness is kind of new. I don't know whether the stress of life has caught up w/me or what. I also don't sleep at night.I toss and turn, no room for me in the bed w/ the dogs etc. sleep deprivation sucks!

horselesswonder
Jan. 12, 2010, 10:15 PM
I don't ever recall feeling this winded and tired before, but maybe it's because I am 34 now.

I had the same problem several years ago. I had no strength and would feel very winded even with little exertion. It turns out I have a heart murmer. It's very slight and it took a specialist to pick it up (my regular doctor couldn't hear it), but it's there. Taking a beta blocker helps, except in the coldest weather, when I actually find it counterproductive. I do find that my energy is lowest in the late afternoon/early evening hours, which is apparently pretty common. So definitely get checked out by your doc, who if nothing else might be able to suggest some lifestyle adjustments and/or strategies for upping your energy.

ReSomething
Jan. 12, 2010, 10:32 PM
Well, I'm older now, and that is part of my problem. Holidays are very busy at my work and if I don't watch out I turn into the queen of procrastination - then I end up looking remarkably like a hoarder at home, and certainly can't find time to use the Gazelle or do my Yoga. Took a lesson after three weeks off, on a very very nice easy to ride horse, and yesterday I was panting and today I am saddlesore.

If you are only 34 though, I would go get a checkup. You might need lifestyle adjustments, as someone said.

rockfordbuckeye
Jan. 13, 2010, 05:40 AM
Not sure how Vitamin D gives more energy? It's a supplement to help your body lay down more calcium in bone. Not that I'm saying taking it's a bad idea. Most people above the Mason Dixon line need at least 1000 units a day in the winter but I'm not sure why it would make anyone feel peppier? The symptom of weakness is unusual and generally only if your levels are really low. If you think you might be really low, you should talk to a doctor and have Vitamin D blood levels drawn before starting high dose (> 400 units/day) treatment. Over treatment is quite serious. Also, replacement takes months to occur. So, taking it for a few days or even a couple weeks is usually not affecting your blood level enough that you would feel "pepped up" per sae..?

Now iron if you're anemic...that might help with the energy thing because anemia for sure causes you to be out of breath because you're not getting good oxygen delivery to tissue, etc. But iron also usually takes at least a month of consistent intake before you see a change in hemoglobin, etc. and in many people it may take longer.

2LeftHooves
Jan. 13, 2010, 06:08 AM
I am always tired, including the horses I now work 5 jobs. I find getting up a little earlier (5 instead of 5:30) and working out either at home or at my gym helps me keep going. On long work days (6am till 7pm including my commute and riding time if I am fast enough at barn work) I only work out for 15 mins. Just enough to get the blood pumping If I can't go in the am (like today for instance my car pool buddy called in sick so I decided to relax a little) I'll go after work. I'm very fit but the little bit of exercise keeps my energy up!

JumpWithPanache
Jan. 13, 2010, 01:07 PM
I also don't sleep at night.I toss and turn, no room for me in the bed w/ the dogs etc. sleep deprivation sucks!

My two Himalayans had always slept in bed with me, one around my head and one behind my knees. However, they got kicked out of the bedroom when my (now) DH came into the picture. He gave it a few months to see if the sleeping arrangement would work out, but there wasn't enough room to sleep and breather for two very long haired cats to stay in bed. So now they, and the kitten, now curl up on the couch downstairs an meow loudly if we sleep in too late. They adjusted, so I'm sure your dogs could adjust too. We keep a baby gate at the stairs so the cats can't come upstairs at all.

Callison
Jan. 13, 2010, 03:32 PM
Thank goodness I'm not the only one! haha. I work a full time job, part time job and I self care board. So I'm up in the morning ever day to do AM chores and then nights I don't work I'm at the barn doing PM chores. I don't get to ride all that much during the winter but man am I EXHAUSTED!

KateKat
Jan. 13, 2010, 03:34 PM
Doesn't sound like you're getting enough sleep. If you're not giving your body the chance to get into REM cycles, you are going to feel tired all the time. Definitely talk to your doc and explore sleep issues.

In addition to exercise, you didn't mention anything about your diet. I've found that what I eat and at what time has a big impact on my performance. Try to eat a balanced snack 1-1.5 hrs prior to riding, like an apple with peanut butter. You want something with the proper balance of complex carbs and protein. If you're just grabbing bagged snacks on the go or not eating for hours and then riding, you will be tired!

myalter1
Jan. 13, 2010, 03:39 PM
Ha ha. We need to start a new group! It's the "I'm perpetually tired and need a vacation group"

OH btw, i mentioned that I am 34 yrs.. what i didn't mention is that i am 5'8 and 140 lbs...it's not like i am grossly overweight or anything.

I actually got a little sleep last night (only tossed and turned a little) and I feel sort of human. But, i am off to Schutzhund training w/ my german shepherd tonight, so i will def. be tired tomorrow (don't get home til about 10PM.) I guess i need less hobbies?

myalter1
Jan. 13, 2010, 03:41 PM
I do not have the best eating habits...maybe some cereal or a bagel for breakfast....whatever for lunch and if i am lucky a snack before I ride...oh, and whatever candy bar i grab about 3 PM...and the coffee i love so much....

KateKat
Jan. 13, 2010, 03:50 PM
I do not have the best eating habits...maybe some cereal or a bagel for breakfast....whatever for lunch and if i am lucky a snack before I ride...oh, and whatever candy bar i grab about 3 PM...and the coffee i love so much....

I think thats definitely contributing to the problem! :)

Too much sugar will cause insulin spikes, which equal one tired person! Definitely make sure you are eating breakfast, try to add more protein (like eggs), have a balanced lunch and skip the candy bar as a snack! Coffee is ok just don't load it up with sugar. Aim for 5 small meals a day to help keep you going.

Oh, and I'm not a nutritionist but I've done lots of eating LOL. Trust me when I say I feel a bazillion times better when I am watching what food I put in my mouth. After all, we don't feed our animals fast food or junk and then expect them to perform!

imnotclever
Jan. 13, 2010, 04:39 PM
I highly recommend indoor rowers to anyone who struggles with getting enough exercise in between rides. I do 10 minute sprints on the rower and combine with lunges and squats for a total of 20 minutes. I work full time and ride at night after work, but wanted to do some exercise that would help my riding fitness.

The indoor rowers are great and so easy to use at home. I have a Concept 2 rower (or something close to that) and I just love it. The sprints on the rower seem to really help keep my cardio up. I have exercise induced asthma and really notice a huge difference when I'm doing the rower regularly.

I'm as lazy as they come, but I have a hard time convincing myself that I don't have 10-15 minutes each night to do a quick workout with the rower.

myalter1
Jan. 13, 2010, 04:46 PM
Katekat,
i used to keep granola and dried fruit/nuts in my desk drawer for a little snack...but of course i have not replenished my stash. i LOVE eggs (and fresh ones - we have chickens at home) but I have high cholesterol (hereditary) so i am afraid to eat them. I guess i should start getting more disciplined about my diet. My husband is 12 yrs older than i am and he is VERY disciplined. I, on the other hand, not so much.

Thanks for the advice! I appreciate it!

KateKat
Jan. 13, 2010, 05:31 PM
Katekat,
i used to keep granola and dried fruit/nuts in my desk drawer for a little snack...but of course i have not replenished my stash. i LOVE eggs (and fresh ones - we have chickens at home) but I have high cholesterol (hereditary) so i am afraid to eat them. I guess i should start getting more disciplined about my diet. My husband is 12 yrs older than i am and he is VERY disciplined. I, on the other hand, not so much.

Thanks for the advice! I appreciate it!

I've read new research that dietary cholesterol may not necessarily be a contributor. Thats not to say get out there and eat 5 eggs every day, but I think a lot of health sources are changing their tune about them and high cholesterol. You can always try egg beaters, which although not the same do serve the same purpose. And if your husband is disciplined, he's got to have some great tips too!

And I forgot to add...drink a ton of water. I feel super lethargic when I don't get at least 90 oz a day.

Ok, I'm done now I promise! :)

EquineRacers
Jan. 13, 2010, 05:35 PM
You might have some other issue going on with your body you should NOT be tired.

I get up at 5am, ride 8-10 horses are the racetrack from 6am to 10pm, then go work at a hospital job from 11am - 5pm, then head off to my stable to see my own horses and ride 1 or 2 of them from 5:30pm - 7pm and that is 6 days a week! I am tired, but not completely out of breath crazy tired such as you describe!

SaddleFitterVA
Jan. 13, 2010, 05:58 PM
Not sure how Vitamin D gives more energy? It's a supplement to help your body lay down more calcium in bone. Not that I'm saying taking it's a bad idea. Most people above the Mason Dixon line need at least 1000 units a day in the winter but I'm not sure why it would make anyone feel peppier? The symptom of weakness is unusual and generally only if your levels are really low. If you think you might be really low, you should talk to a doctor and have Vitamin D blood levels drawn before starting high dose (> 400 units/day) treatment. Over treatment is quite serious. Also, replacement takes months to occur. So, taking it for a few days or even a couple weeks is usually not affecting your blood level enough that you would feel "pepped up" per sae..?

Now iron if you're anemic...that might help with the energy thing because anemia for sure causes you to be out of breath because you're not getting good oxygen delivery to tissue, etc. But iron also usually takes at least a month of consistent intake before you see a change in hemoglobin, etc. and in many people it may take longer.

What, no worries about iron overdose?

From
http://www.ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/vitamind.asp a nice safe government website. Very long, but I used this to decide 2 winter months of the 5000 iu my chiro recommended wouldn't be toxic.


Several nutrition scientists recently challenged these ULs, first published in 1997. They point to newer clinical trials conducted in healthy adults and conclude that the data support a UL as high as 10,000 IU/day. Although vitamin D supplements above recommended levels given in clinical trials have not shown harm, most trials were not adequately designed to assess harm. Evidence is not sufficient to determine the potential risks of excess vitamin D in infants, children, and women of reproductive age.

And if you want to read the entire LONG page on vitamin D, you'll see that the 400 iu RDA is only sufficient to prevent diseases like Ricketts.

It is a fat soluble vitamin, so I won't take it all year at that level. I'm not a big supplement/vitamin consumer, but it was cheap and easy. And my energy level increased.

vacation1
Jan. 13, 2010, 06:30 PM
If you have trouble sleeping or find yourself exhausted beyond what seems reasonable, you might look into sleep apnea and see if you have any symptoms. Despite the popular misconception, it's common and the people who have it aren't all obese. I'm just throwing this out there because I know someone who was recently diagnosed with this. She works long hours and is always 'lazy' on the weekends, but she was constantly tired, easily exhausted and generally just didn't have any energy.

Gry2Yng
Jan. 13, 2010, 09:49 PM
Exhausted. :D

lyndaelyzoo
Jan. 14, 2010, 06:04 PM
I used to feel exhausted all of the time and tried to start taking riding lessons again after a ten-year break from riding . I would make it once around the ring before I would have to stop and catch my breath. I was literally breathing harder than the horse. I saw several doctors, including a sleep specialist and a cardiologist. I literally would come home from work at 3:00 and sleep for three hours and wake up tired. I was sleeping about eleven hours a day and was taking prescribed stimulants and energy pills just to make it through the day. I was suspected to have narcolepsy and was supposed to undergo a sleep test. The doctor suggested that I may need to take ritalin or amphetamine-type drug. Whenever I discussed my lethargy to anyone, they would ask if I was taking vitamins. I never realized that it was the vitamins I was taking that were making me exhausted. I was taking the GNC active women multiplex vitamins and was under the assumption that they would give me energy not take it away. However, since I stopped taking them about a week ago, I have literally become a different person. I am actually alive and energetic!!! I don't feel the chronic need for sleep.!! I cannot believe I was almost prescribed amphetamine-like drugs when all I needed to do was stop taking my vitamins!!!!!! :winkgrin:

meupatdoes
Jan. 14, 2010, 08:08 PM
A couple people I know SWEAR BY CoQ10.

It is (if I am remembering this anecdotal evidence correctly) apparently in every muscle in the body and is vital to energy creation and somehow additionally makes the joints less stiff.
Or something.


However based on what you said about your diet that seems to be the first thing to overhaul.

I am not a nutritionist, so I can only share what works for me, but I AM the LAZIEST most CONVENIENCE-OBSESSED possible "cook" so if perhaps not nutritionally *perfect* this is at the very least an easy way to get some fruits and veggies in...

My main rule is I always try to make sure I am eating enough fat, carbs and protein.

Breakfast is mini-wheats or something equally fiber-inclusive, whole milk, a piece of fruit/glass of juice, a little yogurt drink and if the day is going to be physically tough a PBJ with extra peanut butter and an extra glass of whole milk.

Lunch is some sort of pasta salad which can be made ahead of time and stored in serving size tupperwares. Things I add to the pasta include cherry tomatoes (no need to slice), pre-sliced mushrooms (who would EVER buy non-sliced mushrooms when the sliced ones are right next to it??), red/navy/garbanzo/green beans from a can, and always ALWAYS some mozarella cubes for the fat and protein.

Dinner is a green salad which can be made 'hearty', with beans/avocado/tomato/cucumber/mushrooms/etc or 'sweet' with craisins/orange slices/apples/pears/ricotta cheese.
If I am hungry after a long day I will have another bowl of cereal for desert.

A good quick snack is an avocado; keep a little squirt bottle of lemon juice in the fridge for it, add a dash of salt, and voila.
Other heathful and easily portable snacks are apples and bananas.

None of these meals take longer than 10 minutes to prepare and consume, unless you count cooking the pasta for the pasta salad which can be done in advance and will average out to less than 10 minutes per serving.

Good luck with getting more energy; I think it is probably the boring stuff like eat your veggies and get your beauty sleep that will do the trick.

FineAlready
Jan. 14, 2010, 09:55 PM
I highly recommend indoor rowers to anyone who struggles with getting enough exercise in between rides. I do 10 minute sprints on the rower and combine with lunges and squats for a total of 20 minutes. I work full time and ride at night after work, but wanted to do some exercise that would help my riding fitness.

The indoor rowers are great and so easy to use at home. I have a Concept 2 rower (or something close to that) and I just love it. The sprints on the rower seem to really help keep my cardio up. I have exercise induced asthma and really notice a huge difference when I'm doing the rower regularly.

I'm as lazy as they come, but I have a hard time convincing myself that I don't have 10-15 minutes each night to do a quick workout with the rower.

I would just note that if you start using a rowing machine, please make sure someone teaches you how to use it properly and also make sure you do not overdo it. I injured my back on a rowing machine about 5 years ago, and it has never been the same. At least two or three times a year, I get a flare up and it is just not fun (having one now, actually).

jen-s
Jan. 14, 2010, 09:59 PM
Get thee to a doctor! Talk to your doc about your nutrition, your sleep hygiene, your family history, etc and get lots of bloodwork checked. Think yearly physical minus the pap smear. ;) It could be as simple as a vitamin deficiency or a thyroid problem or, god forbid, something more complicated.

Or it could be that your lazy horse needs to learn to respond to aids more crisply so you don't have to work so hard (ask me how I know about that one!! :winkgrin::winkgrin:).

Seriously, your schedule sounds remarkably like mine and your energy level is definitely similar. I work in healthcare and spent 3 years in nutrition, so I know a bit about what I'm saying. Get an overall look at what could be going on by someone qualified and that you can trust. And then hopefully you'll be well on your way to a better spring.

rockfordbuckeye
Jan. 15, 2010, 06:39 PM
I second going to a doctor. Vitamins and supplements all have risks and benefits and should be monitored. Serious fatigue can be associated with a lot of benign things and a lot of serious things (obstructive sleep apnea, cancers, thyroid problems, anemia). Self treating can lead to delays in proper diagnosis that can be life threatening. If I had a $1 for every time a parent told me they regretted not taking their children's symptoms of fatigue, etc. seriously and sooner - I'd be rich.

Also, referral to a dietitian is a great idea. There's a lot of information on the internet and also a lot of MISinformation.

SweetTooth
Jan. 15, 2010, 06:47 PM
I also had debilitating fatigue (along with some pretty severe GI symptoms). Not saying this is what is going on with you, but I had too much yeast in my digestive tract (most people do and don't even know it). Some supplements and a change in diet helped me greatly.

I agree with those that advise looking at your diet. Cut out sugar and processed foods, and up your protein intake .

Also, after having two kids, I just didn't feel right. Call it intuition, but I asked my Primary Care Dr. to run a blood panel including hormones. Surprising to her (but not to me), all of my hormones were low. Basically menopause-level at age 40. I am in the process of trying to get that squared away now.

Definitely listen to what your body is telling you, and let your doctor rule out anything major.

Good luck!

equest
Jan. 15, 2010, 06:48 PM
You sound like me - just out of shape. I need to start doing some kind of cardio but I really hate most things (home workout tapes, running, etc). I know working out isn't supposed to be fun but I don't think I should dread it either. :)

I agree - I am just not in cardio shape. I'm not overweight but I lack cardio stamina. It has really been clear to me during the summers here when it is just so hot, I can barely get around a full course. I ride 3 times per week but have not really been doing other cardio :(
I need to get my butt in gear before it warms up here.

ktm2007
Jan. 15, 2010, 08:02 PM
Are you tired most of the day? Any other things going on? (dry, brittle skin/nails. hair falling out, odd break outs, ect.) I'll throw out getting your thyroid checked if you havent, since it already seems that many people are telling ya to get to the doctor! :) I have a thyroid that doesn't work at all, and I can tell when my meds are not regulating it like they are supposed to. Tiredness is a huge side effect of a malfunctioning thyroid.