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denver
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:02 AM
What do you recommend for a young horse that is at the baby green hunter level with a very sensitive mouth. I haven't found the perfect fit.

Chic Hunter
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:05 AM
I have yet to find a horse that does not excell in this kind bit.

http://www.beval.com/Products/Herm-Sprenger-KK-Conrad-Ultra-Dee-Bit/1329002.aspx

tBHj
Jan. 12, 2010, 01:37 AM
I have yet to find a horse that does not excell in this kind bit.

http://www.beval.com/Products/Herm-Sprenger-KK-Conrad-Ultra-Dee-Bit/1329002.aspx

This one is a good choice.

tallygirl
Jan. 12, 2010, 03:19 AM
I have yet to find a horse that does not excell in this kind bit.

http://www.beval.com/Products/Herm-Sprenger-KK-Conrad-Ultra-Dee-Bit/1329002.aspx

is this bit good on any horse or just greenies? im thinking about trying this one out too. does anyone have a pic on what their horse looks like while riding in this bit? :) just curious.

Equinoxfox
Jan. 12, 2010, 08:42 AM
So what bit are MOST of you breaking / starting young horses in .. :confused:

nlk
Jan. 12, 2010, 08:57 AM
I honestly don't remember the last time we broke a horse and didn't use a D-ring happy mouth

However all of my greenies go in a regular D-ring snaffle. With the exception of one who is currently going in a loose ring similar to the D-ring posted.

I'm a big believer that you don't have to do everything in the same bit ALL THE TIME. I think it keeps their attention if every now and then you throw in something like a french link or something with a little (and I mean little ) bit more leverage. Eventually you are going to say "hey my horse REALLY seems to go better in this bit then anything else, he seems so happy"

A lot of people think egg butts, D-rings and loose rings are all comparable. Or the softer the bit the better the horse will like it......not true

My greenie use to always use a loose ring before I bought him ( I knew the previous owners well) a loose ring is supposed to be the softest of the three bits listed. It drove my horse NUTS. he hated the movement of it and that he could feel every little movement. I put him in a nice D-ring and he was more then willing to carry himself in a nice frame.

Now I have a OTTB whom I started in the same bit. She went well enough but seemed kind of cranky. I changed her to a loose ring french link (similar to the one posted in the center) and she is a much happier baby girl!

My whole point to this if anyone gets down this far is that you may have to try a few different bits until you find the one that makes your baby happy after they are broke!

Equinoxfox
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:49 AM
Thank You . That is what I needed to know. I have a : Full Cheek Snaffle , a Loose Ring , and a Happy Mouth that I will send with him to get broke.
Then, from there just play around with the different ones to see what works best for him. I want to keep his mouth as SOFT and Supple as possible without alot of gimicks or rough equipment. I believe that the simplier the training the happier the horse.:yes:

naturalequus
Jan. 12, 2010, 04:03 PM
I think you've got the right idea (JMO). I usually start a young horse in a plain rope hackamore, actually, until our communication is more subtle and they've got the basics down. The first bit is then usually a full cheek, a loose-ring (double-jointed) Happy Mouth, or a plain loose-ring (single jointed). Try to get some sweet iron in there, though I have found they seem to love the taste of the HM as well...but it can be chewed up easily with a young horse. The gentler, the better, but after that, it is all experimentation to see what your horse likes :) I really like the full cheeks if I am working with a horse who is still learning to steer, esp if I cannot use a rope hackamore to teach them the basics...it offers a little more guidance to them and seems to make cues easier for the horse to understand.

sptraining
Jan. 12, 2010, 04:11 PM
I started mine in a loose ring french link and then moved to a D-ring Dr. Bristol. My mare has a smaller mouth, so large mouthpieces drove her batty. She is much happier with a thinner snaffle. I've noticed that most horses (if not heavy drafty strong wb types) go quite well in a french link. I do love my Herm Sprenger. :)

Spud&Saf
Jan. 12, 2010, 04:42 PM
This might be a nice choice:

http://www.beval.com/Products/Herm-Sprenger-Duo-Mullen-Dee/1331002.aspx

nlk
Jan. 12, 2010, 07:11 PM
This might be a nice choice:

http://www.beval.com/Products/Herm-Sprenger-Duo-Mullen-Dee/1331002.aspx

I like that one! I might have to add that to my arsenal!

On the other hand does anyone know why D-rings are so popular in the hunter ring? (boarder line taboo to use anything else?) It's probably some really logical answer but I can't say I have ever known the answer....

hollynanne
Jan. 12, 2010, 07:31 PM
This is what my mare (until recently) rode in:
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-01798&ids=585933247

This is what we started in:
http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-010157&ids=585933247
And, this is also what we're back in...

Moral of the story... their needs and wants change...
(we're going back to the Mikmar, it's been her favorite)

hntrjmprpro45
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:22 PM
I start my horses in french link loose rings or sometimes a basic D-ring. I like doing hunter breeding classes and other in-hand training so by the time I start them undersaddle they are very comfortable in a bridle. As they progress they may move to D-rings or Full cheeks.

If your horse seems very sensitive check its mouth. Some horses have unusually shaped palates often requiring a bit with a different thickness or different curvature. A lot of times you don't need to switch the type of bit but may just need to switch to a different size/style to accomodate for the horse's mouth.

Lucassb
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:49 PM
I use this one a lot:

http://www.doversaddlery.com/product.asp?pn=X1-01183&ids=689033481

sweetpea
Jan. 13, 2010, 08:21 AM
I m with Lucassb!
I use this in a O ring or eggbutt-- and D if showing

I use this on young ones and made horse that I get to school around and loosen up.