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View Full Version : For fun: H/J lingo...you know you ride when you say



Beau Cheval
Jan. 11, 2010, 07:19 PM
You know you ride horses when there are strict grammatical structures...they just aren't the same ones as in English

"The barn I ride at"

"I lessoned with..."

"She hacked her out"

I was writing something and I noticed that those are incredibly badly structured phrases, but there is no other way to say it in the horse world.

Add more =):lol:

hntrjmprpro45
Jan. 11, 2010, 07:43 PM
Just last night I was with my husband in the car and I used the word "pace" to talk about the car's speed.

breezy28
Jan. 11, 2010, 07:54 PM
"flatted" the horse today - I really cannot stand that phrase - don't know why - maybe it was the person that always said it was a really cliche type talker and that bothered me more!

Catomine
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:05 PM
"flatted" the horse today - I really cannot stand that phrase - don't know why - maybe it was the person that always said it was a really cliche type talker and that bothered me more!

haha, I say that, and I always feel it is not even a word outside the horse world. Gets the point across though!

spmoonie
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:11 PM
I was giving my science fair presentation the other day and was trying to explain to my class how and why a thrush infection can cause a horse to go lame. They all thought I mean "lame" as in "uncool." :lol::lol:

Catomine
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:22 PM
There are soooo many strange phrases and terms associate with horses and riding, you could list them for days!

Here are a couple that most people don't understand if they aren't riders:

'I put in the 'add' on the line' (extra stride)
or
'I pushed for the move up on the out' (bigger spot over fence)

'Burying' the horse at the fence or 'chasing' him into the fence

'Getting 'left' at a fence or 'dropping' them at the jump.

'Skipped' the change (lead change)

(Heck- most people don't even get what a 'lead' is in the first place! I also think 'fence' is a funny term for a 'jump' to everyone else).

'Hacked' out.
Horse is a 'packer' over fences.
'On the bit', 'Over the bit', 'Under the bit', 'Avoiding the bit'.








'

Void
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:32 PM
'On the bit', 'Over the bit', 'Under the bit', 'Avoiding the bit'.


And reference to the bit. We use the term "On the Muscle" a lot in reference to my horse lol

blackcat95
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:37 PM
"Green" is one no one outside the horse world gets.
Also "ask" as in "ask for a flying change". Most people are like "isn't it just tell?"
"Schoolie" as in school horse
"My barn" as in the barn I ride at. They always ask "Oh, you own it?" No, I wish.
"Tack" as in "tack up" or "saddle"

Void
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:39 PM
My friends always laugh when I say my Horse is "High" they always go "Wouldn't that make him more laid back?"

OverandOnward
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:43 PM
"schooled the water"

Wasn't thinking. Wish I had a picture of the absolute, perfect blankness of the faces of the non-horsey people.

One time at dinner the evening of a xc schooling ride, the non-horsey friends politely asked "so did all the rain make a difference for your ride today?" And I said automatically "Well, there was water in the water." :D

Vandy
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:46 PM
My friends always laugh when I say my Horse is "High" they always go "Wouldn't that make him more laid back?"All depends what he's high on ;)

I still remember being at a show as a kid and asking my mom to go back to the trailer to get my cooler. Ten minutes later, I spot her struggling back under the weight of a huge coleman cooler full of ice and beverages...Um, that's not what I meant.

Void
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:50 PM
All depends what he's high on ;)

I still remember being at a show as a kid and asking my mom to go back to the trailer to get my cooler. Ten minutes later, I spot her struggling back under the weight of a huge coleman cooler full of ice and beverages...Um, that's not what I meant.

I meant just in general my horse is High = Hyper.

I just had the "Cooler" moment like 5 mins ago when my friend asked me what I got at awards and I complained because I really wish I had gotten a cooler. And she said that would be cool because then we could keep beers cold ringside. lol

OverandOnward
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:54 PM
And oh yeah ... the names/descriptive terms of all the jumps, although they learn those fast. "Oxer" is the hardest one for those who see it once a year to remember. Then it's understanding why people referring to the "vertical" and the "wall" are not usually speaking about the same jump, and that a "triple combination" isn't the same as an "in-and-out" - didn't they have to jump in to and out of the triple? :confused:

But it is very cute when non-horsey spectators do pick up on some terminology after seeing a few rounds, get caught up in the excitement, and start going on about "stopped at the oxer" and "pulled 4 rails" when they don't know a girth from a browband. :D :winkgrin:

SkipChange
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:55 PM
"Green" is one no one outside the horse world gets.


Actually "green" holds its meaning outside the horse world. A bit outdated outside the horse world, yes. It always frustrates me when people don't understand the term because it is defined plain and clear in the dictionary as not only a color but deficient in training, knowledge, or experience. I have come across it in several non-horsey books.

OverandOnward
Jan. 11, 2010, 08:59 PM
...
"My barn" as in the barn I ride at. They always ask "Oh, you own it?" No, I wish.
...

I've learned not to say "my barn" so people don't think I have buckets of money that I do not have. But I can never think of how to refer to the barn where I ride without lots of words - what short phrase works for non-horsey people?

And the word "barn" doesn't work, they think of a big red haybarn, and wonder why I don't keep my horse at a horse stable. :yes: :confused:

SkipChange
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:08 PM
People always think I say "bar" when I mention the barn. :lol: :lol: :lol: Can't count the number of times I've asked "Will I see you at the bar later?" and eager bystanders are wanting to accompany us as well. Gotta love college. In high school we just got shocked looks :lol:

KitKat987
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:09 PM
I meant just in general my horse is High = Hyper.

I just had the "Cooler" moment like 5 mins ago when my friend asked me what I got at awards and I complained because I really wish I had gotten a cooler. And she said that would be cool because then we could keep beers cold ringside. lol

Just last week my (green to horses) husband came to watch a lesson. When I got off I asked him to grab me the cooler on the bench beside him. What I got was a very confused looking husband instead. I explained to him that I wanted the blue fleece thing in the plastic bag. He took it out, but then proceeded to argue that it should be called a 'warmer' since it was meant to keep the horse warm while cooling him out.

Sunnyhorse
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:14 PM
* "Pulled a rail" (or "had a rail").
* "He has a big step."
* "I'm going to go feed." ("I'm hauling to the show" is another one like that.)
* "My trainer" (nonhorsey people don't understand that trainers are for people and horses).

ReSomething
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:19 PM
Actually that is pretty interesting that when I say "high as a kite" talking about a horse everybody horsie knows he is bouncing off the walls, and the non-horse people think he is staggering along half asleep.

hollynanne
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:38 PM
I had one recently. I was having dinner with some non-horsey girlfriends. They were all talking about "going to the city" (i.e. Seattle) to go shopping the next day. When asked if I wanted to go, I said that I had lots of fencing to do. They asked if I taught fencing... I looked at them and said that I would be more than happy to teach them, but it is a lot of hard work. This went on for several minutes, until I realized that they meant... fencing = people with swords... I had to explain to them that, in my world, fencing = what keeps the livestock on the correct piece of property!
:lol:

Beau Cheval
Jan. 11, 2010, 09:46 PM
How about a top-of-the-line large?

People always think I'm being self-congratulatory.

"Behind the vertical" I don't think a non-horse person could even begin to parse that one

blackcat95
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:11 PM
Some more:

"On his forehand"- most people think I said "forehead" and get really worried.
"Gave more leg"- just really confusing to others who don't understand how riding actually works...
"On the rail"- fenceposts?
"Rollback"- wait... your horse rolls while you're riding. ;)
"Up"- same as high
"On the right diagonal"- I had enough trouble explaining this to my totally horsey mom...

FineAlready
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:17 PM
"Had a good trip" (good hunter round). People assume acid trip, I think.

Vandy
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:33 PM
"Had a good trip" (good hunter round). People assume acid trip, I think.:lol:

Or alternatively, trip = fall. I had a non-horsey friend who knew I'd just been to a show and asked how I did. I said I had a really good trip in the big class, and she said, "Oh no, is the horse okay?"

JazCreekInc.
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:38 PM
I had one recently. I was having dinner with some non-horsey girlfriends. They were all talking about "going to the city" (i.e. Seattle) to go shopping the next day. When asked if I wanted to go, I said that I had lots of fencing to do. They asked if I taught fencing... I looked at them and said that I would be more than happy to teach them, but it is a lot of hard work. This went on for several minutes, until I realized that they meant... fencing = people with swords... I had to explain to them that, in my world, fencing = what keeps the livestock on the correct piece of property!
:lol:

To further muck things up... when you are fencing on a reining horse you are basically kicking them in to the fence to school their slide stop... that is originally what I thought you meant even though I live on a 15 acre farm and we have to work on our fencing quite often (especially where the cows from the neighbors come to visit!):lol::lol:

Flypony
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:40 PM
Off your Jumper topic, but in racing the call of "coming hard on the outside" can raise an eyebrow from the uniformed

hntrjmprpro45
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:07 AM
Something I run into is when I say "I am going to the barn" or "So I was at the barn..." people sometimes think I am saying "The bar". I had someone say "You were at the bar for 14 hours????".

Janet
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:13 AM
Dressage lingo can be even worse.

You should have seen the blank stare from the non-horsey at "it was quite good except the mediums weren't really through".

I think she thought we were talking abou seances!

rottngirl
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:20 AM
I told a non-horsey friend the other day,

"I was jumping and got chucked off at the last second on a dirty stop and took out the standard with my stupid body, cutting my knee on the jump cup".

She just blinked. :eek:

Inevitably, I got asked what were you trying to jump and and how did a cup cut your knee?????? :cool:

doublesstable
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:31 AM
I just get weird looks from people when I "cluck" to my kids to move forward....

Oh and when I talk to someone about the "FOOTING".... they think I'm talking about my house foundation....

luckeys71
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:54 AM
You ask people, "Wher do you ride?" Non-horse people would think the answer would be outside or the park, when you want to know what barn or trainer you ride with. Same as,"Who do ride with?". My friends? No what trainer do you take lessons from!

SarahandSam
Jan. 12, 2010, 06:38 AM
When I mention my pony, non-horse people believe that I ride some sort of magical miniature adorable Thelwell-esque creature, and look at me strangely. Then I have to explain horse height measurement ("see, when I taped him, he was 14.1 1/2, but the one time I sticked him he was 14.2 1/2, but that was before a trim, so I've got to stick him again once he's more relaxed and trimmed, because I want him to be a pony...") and it just goes downhill from there.

Big_Grey_hunter
Jan. 12, 2010, 06:45 AM
I got some confused looks for saying "I pulled his mane"

Some other ones that get weird looks are...

He always gets a piece of the hack

I have to good school my horse

He was very uphill/downhill today!

The footing was so good today

I had to shank him today (no I am NOT stabbing him, he just needed a stud chain)

make x it x so
Jan. 12, 2010, 07:47 AM
"He was really dead today." (quiet)
or even, "He was really quiet."

One makes people think you are riding an animal that is no longer physically alive, the other they think that you trained him to not talk to much. :cool:

There are, of course, the "dirty" sounding ones too such as:

"I had to use the whip a few times today"
"He was being fresh so I gave him a good smack"
"You have to squeeze really hard for him to come into your hands/the bridle/the bit"
-----------------
Let's just say I try as hard as I can to put everything I say into lay-man's terms, especially when dealing with people in my age group (college).

nlk
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:17 AM
People always think I say "bar" when I mention the barn. :lol: :lol: :lol: Can't count the number of times I've asked "Will I see you at the bar later?" and eager bystanders are wanting to accompany us as well. Gotta love college. In high school we just got shocked looks :lol:

When I was in high school and people would ask me where I worked I would say at a barn, they would hear at a "bar" and ask me how I pulled that one off seems how I was 16.

I thought I was over this until a neighbor came by to love on my dog the other, freezing I might add, day. Apparently this woman watches for my dog(he looks like a giant bear rug) and one day walked by and ask my husband, with a beer in his hand, where the dog was. He replied at the barn she heard at the bar. When she ran into me she insisted that my husband said "Bar" and since he had a beer in his had he was drunk so she of course didn't hear anything wrong!

Now on to my favorites

"Go walk your ponies out" to which in the last six months I have had several beginners look at me and ask "where?" or try to leave the ring and go out side. When I asked them where they were going they replied "walking our horses out" In the 10 years I have taught I have NEVER had this happen until this summer, now it's like they all don't get it!

Trailering always comes up as mis-spelled. as in "I am trailering 6 horses to a show" it drives me nuts.(of course the new computer seems to understand this fine now that I wrote this:lol:)

"Scopey" The only way I could figure how to spell it was to put scope with a y at the end!

Diagonals - many new riders who are older the 10 try to go across the diagonal on the ring, when you explain that in riding we have TWO different types of diagonals they reply the second diagonal across the ring . When you explain to them that they are going to learn to be on the correct diagonal when posting the trot (another bad phrase!) they are totally perplexed and can't fathom that a diagonal has anything to do with actual riding

nlk
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:24 AM
Whatabout context of words in our own world.

You have a diagonal and diagonal. "go across your diagonal for a rein change" or "change your diagonal"

Vertical "he's behind the vertical" or " go jump that vertical"

to horse people who are learning imagine the confusion!

"you're horse is behind the vertical!"

"Of course he's behind the vertical, I haven't jumped it yet!"

Donkaloosa
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:29 AM
"Packer," as in "That horse is a packer over fences/on trails/whatever," has always been one of my favorites. The non-horse person gets the impression that it's a horse ready to be packed into a dog food can!

"banging a tail"

"wrong front and back" is an expression used around here a lot (or at least it was) for a horse who was cross-firing --- but then, a non-horse person wouldn't understand crossfiring, either!

Before my very non-horsie mother ever saw a wash rack and watched me give a horse a bath, she thought we washed horses in racks that were like car washes --- the water, brushes, etc., moved over the tied-in horse!

3 is the limit
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:43 AM
Some I hear quite regularly:

Go school that corner (love that school is now a verb)

When I'm in the backseat of the saddle, hearing Don't ride backwards to the jump!

Cindeye
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:13 PM
"the long approach to the single oxer"
"Where did you meet Oscar?"

clucking at traffic to get them moving...my non-riding son just rolls his eyes

don't get me started on the looks Annie Boots and I got in line at Starbucks one day when I commented that Jackson "looked a little sticky in his stifle" and that maybe his "tendon sheath insertion was the problem." I think the guy behind me thought I was giving my then 14-year daughter some inappropriate pointers.

RugBug
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:32 PM
Go school that corner (love that school is now a verb)


I'm pretty sure school has always been a verb as well as a noun. ;)

Truth be told, any sport or hobby has its own lingo that is foreign to outsiders.

DMK
Jan. 12, 2010, 12:35 PM
after driving on the ice down here in GA the last few days, I've found that I describe the experience as "trying to keep control of the hind end". Horse people understand perfectly, because that IS what he back wheels are, right?

We worked on some impressive lateral movements, I might add...

monalisa
Jan. 12, 2010, 01:18 PM
I mentioned to someone that my cat was not "sound" and they had no idea what I was referring to....

ClassAction
Jan. 12, 2010, 02:09 PM
"I needed more oomph!"

luvs2ridewbs
Jan. 12, 2010, 02:15 PM
My husband is very into sports. He has finally grown acustomed (sp?) to me using horse terms to describe players. Such as- "I don't think he *insert football player here* is going to walk away from that hit sound." or when a trade is in the works "Have they vetted him yet?"

ccoronios
Jan. 12, 2010, 02:40 PM
One of my favorites ...

"take your feet out of the stirrups and cross them in front of you"

Y'all know how to do that, right?

Imagine the OMG moment when you look up and kid is struggling to stay on while attempting to cross her FEET over in front of her!!!!

And another..

How many times do we tell young/beginnerish riders to "look up"?

We had one who was forever running into things - other riders, jumps, trees - in the ring. "Susie - what are you doing? WATCH WHERE YOU'RE GOING!!!"

"B..b...b...you keep telling me to look up and when I look up, I can't see where I'm going!"

sptraining
Jan. 12, 2010, 04:16 PM
The term 'solid citizen' in reference to a 'packer' always cracks me up.

gmv567
Jan. 12, 2010, 04:48 PM
My favorite is when I walk into class (high school) and loudly exclaim to another rider (without thinking), "I did three last night. I am so SORE! How many did you do and how were they?" or "Bill was such a jerk last night when I did him, I am going to have to ride him hard for an hour tonight!" That gets the best looks... even teachers look at me strangely. Even if I use rode instead did I get looks (when did it become the normal thing to say "did" instead of "rode" anyway?). I just laugh, I don't even think about what I am saying. It is like when I see another rider my mind turn to horse talk and I don't think. Also I pole vault, one day in the rain all of the other vaulters were having trouble holding their poles without their hands sliding down... but not me. When they asked why a had such crazy grip, I told them it was from practice and riding in the rain. They got a good laugh out of that one, because the 16 yr old boys were not thinking about horses. If you think about it, you could really twist a lot of phrases that riders use to sound really dirty.

Treasmare2
Jan. 12, 2010, 05:40 PM
Last night my daughter's facebook message said "Only in a family with horses would you come home to find a whip on your parents coffee table and not find that a disturbing experience". This is true. Good thing she didn't have a boyfriend with her.

"Giving air over a fence" is a good one.

There are three kinds of coolers...the blanket, beverage cooler and what's in the cooler.

"Finding a spot" and "missing a distance"

It is formal to have a stock around your neck

Getting loaded for the show is not in reference to drinking but to getting things on a trailer

moving up is not getting richer

young_ammy
Jan. 12, 2010, 05:48 PM
I have a very strange urge to cluck at little kids. My parrot has picked up on the clucking I do around the house..it's hilarious.

I never think of any of those as dirty because I'm so in the zone when I ride. Now it's freakin hilarious!

Not really lingo, but you know you ride horses when you silently count strides between cracks in sidewalks, between rooms in your house, etc...

young_ammy
Jan. 12, 2010, 06:03 PM
Ah, found some lingo!

When you "chip" a fence. Get close, put in a half-stride..."We chipped at that fence."

jaslyn1701
Jan. 12, 2010, 06:37 PM
As a relatively young person (in riding years), I got the strangest looks when, after a great ride, I was boasting about "him being right there, between my legs and it felt wonderful".........

pinkme
Jan. 12, 2010, 07:30 PM
People always think I say "bar" when I mention the barn. :lol: :lol: :lol: Can't count the number of times I've asked "Will I see you at the bar later?" and eager bystanders are wanting to accompany us as well. Gotta love college. In high school we just got shocked looks :lol:


I was behind a truck when a bad accident happened. The cops were questioning me about what I saw. I said well I was on the way home from the Barn.. the cop heard BAR and a whole new set of questions came up!

Lieb Schon
Jan. 12, 2010, 07:33 PM
Harmless question..."What kind of horse do you have?"

Answer: "A breed of which you've probably never heard."

"Is it a weird mini me freaky horse?"

"No, it's a warmblood breed called Trakehner."

"Aren't all horses warmblooded?"

"....................................Um, well once upon a time......"

:DI have spent more time explaining this to men I work with that I've gotten pretty good at a very abbreviated explanation without getting a glazed eye!

howardh
Jan. 12, 2010, 07:34 PM
Well, "gone to ground" means we are not leaving the house, not the fox is gone to ground.......

ctab
Jan. 12, 2010, 08:27 PM
Used the key fob to "unlock" the locker/stall door. On several occasions. Then bringing the purse to the locker (habit when you leave the car to go somewhere) and the halter to the car (leaving in a rush).

My friend bends forward over big bumps while driving. We both "leg yield" to change lanes.

Clucking to everything to get it to move, cars going too slow, people walking too slow, children to move.

Lunging the dogs for fun.

Watching anything with legs to see if they move soundly. Esp if I am bored.

Slip this in conversation with people who have boats "The port is too high/low".

Always concentrating on walking evenly on both legs (I have a bad left ankle and a bad right knee), esp coming to a reflective door.

Dreaming I am riding a horse along the road when I am a passenger in a car. Those long straight stretches just invite a gallop.

"He didn't like the French link, the Boucher, the Dr. Bristol or the full cheek slow twist. I was tempted once to put him in a gag but the loose ring KK Ultra was the best one yet"

"I put him in draw reins"
"You put him in paper reins you drew?"

"Get me the running martingale" "How can I catch it?"

"I had to twitch him to clip his ears" "WTF?!?!"

Wearing you riding outfit to the baby store to get Monkey Butt powder or Desitin cream. And surprised to see Udder Balm in the same isle!

Catomine
Jan. 12, 2010, 08:34 PM
Just last week my (green to horses) husband came to watch a lesson. When I got off I asked him to grab me the cooler on the bench beside him. What I got was a very confused looking husband instead. I explained to him that I wanted the blue fleece thing in the plastic bag. He took it out, but then proceeded to argue that it should be called a 'warmer' since it was meant to keep the horse warm while cooling him out.

Hahah, I can relate to that. Kind of similar situation happened before when I asked my long-time boyfriend to please put the saddle on my horse. (he's seen me do it a MILLION times). Said horse was on crossties for about 10 minutes in a busy barn while I put on my riding clothes... came out to see him standing there with the saddle completely BACKWARDS!! I was mortified.. I can't imagine how many people saw the saddle sitting there like that wondering what kind of idiot I was! Couldn't yell at BF though, he was only trying to help and I should have just done it myself. ;)

Catomine
Jan. 12, 2010, 08:37 PM
Something I run into is when I say "I am going to the barn" or "So I was at the barn..." people sometimes think I am saying "The bar". I had someone say "You were at the bar for 14 hours????".

people ALWAYS say that to me!

blackcat95
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:31 PM
Lolol I love these!!! I was just talking to a friend about this the other day... she's nonhorsey and didn't get ANYTHING I was saying.

I love how everything sounds sooo dirty when you think about it. It makes me crack up because I actually realized this a long time ago and have always been really careful how I phrase things, especially around teenage boys, but sometimes I slip up and say things like "I really had to make him move up into my hand" or "He was so stiff off his back end".

ExJumper
Jan. 12, 2010, 09:55 PM
Wondering why the OctoMom didn't "pinch one off." (Or six or seven, for that matter!)

Piadosa
Jan. 12, 2010, 10:08 PM
The best thing ever when I ran into a girl from my barn while getting lunch in town. She was telling me how she switched to a new trainer and planned on buying a young horse. Our conversation seemed perfectly normal to us, but you should have seen the look on the guys face behind us when he heard what we were saying, since he had no idea that we were actually talking about horses.

It went something like:
Her: "I've been with Andrew (trainer) for a couple weeks now, I love him!"
Me: "Yeah, I really like him, all the girls he has seem to really enjoy him. What are you doing with him?"
Her: "Well I really want a baby. Andrew and I don't really know each other that well yet, but I really trust him so I think I'm going to go for it."
Me: "You totally should, Andrew is great with the young ones"
Her: "Yeah, some of his other girls have babies too, he is doing such a good job with them"

The guys face was priceless.

skip916
Jan. 12, 2010, 11:24 PM
piadosa- lol that sounds like a normal convo to me!

"she looks a little stifley today" - to my husband about our dog

clucking at red lights, the dogs, anything...

"look at her half pass!" - again, about the dog to poor non horsey husband

"i really had to drive her with my seat"

"i threw a sheet on her" to friend, followed by "that didnt scare her?" from nonhorsey friend

"if you ride her with your hands or a loud seat she will dump you"- yes, people probably wonder about my sexuality when i say things like that in public.

Big_Grey_hunter
Jan. 13, 2010, 06:39 AM
One time I was talking a friend in school and completely forgot to watch my 'horse lingo'.

"He's such a big guy, he's super fun to ride. I hate riding him bareback though, I just slide right off! "

I think a few kids eyes nearly popped out of their head, I had to explain, lol

ccoronios
Jan. 13, 2010, 11:36 AM
Oh Piadoso -
ROTFLMAO!!!!!
C

Beau Cheval
Jan. 13, 2010, 02:00 PM
It went something like:
Her: "I've been with Andrew (trainer) for a couple weeks now, I love him!"
Me: "Yeah, I really like him, all the girls he has seem to really enjoy him. What are you doing with him?"
Her: "Well I really want a baby. Andrew and I don't really know each other that well yet, but I really trust him so I think I'm going to go for it."
Me: "You totally should, Andrew is great with the young ones"
Her: "Yeah, some of his other girls have babies too, he is doing such a good job with them"

The guys face was priceless.

That's great!!!

wolfpackfan
Jan. 13, 2010, 04:29 PM
I tried to use oxer in a scrabble game online and it told me it is not a word!

My non horse friends always look at me stupidly when I say "they pinned the class" or when they pinned the class. I had a lady ask me if they get pins to wear and could she see my daughters.

On the Buckle...it took me a while to realize what this was.

My friends also think it is strange when I tell them my daughters favorite part of horse showing is when she gets to "jog". Or that they "jogged" the class. The same lady that asked about the pins said "I thought they rode the horses". Yes, she is a bit late in the game!


Ah horse language....I love it!!!!!!!!!!

worth_the_wait08
Jan. 13, 2010, 06:45 PM
My trainer and I were watching a particularly rough couse at a show one time when she commented that the rider must be hungry- I turned to her, confused. Her response? "well, she's eating those spots for breakfast, lunch, and dinner" :lol:

just another example of how confusing our language can be- even among other horse people!

blackcat95
Jan. 13, 2010, 07:08 PM
My trainer and I were watching a particularly rough couse at a show one time when she commented that the rider must be hungry- I turned to her, confused. Her response? "well, she's eating those spots for breakfast, lunch, and dinner" :lol:

just another example of how confusing our language can be- even among other horse people!

So agree!!! My old trainer tended to use obscure adjectives to discribe different horses such as:

Fruitcake
Monkey
Wiggleworm
Green-bean

It took me a while to catch on...

I cluck at everything too!!! I think it's contagious... I've tried leg-yielding in the halls to get out of the way of the upperclassmen. I trot on the treadmill. I count strides when I'm walking. I lean over little "jumps" in the car. I constantly look to see whether my dog is trotting or cantering.

What now? I keep telling people I'm lame (I've got a back injury), and they're always like "No you're not!!! You're really cool!" No, that's not what I meant... :D

hollynanne
Jan. 13, 2010, 07:35 PM
OT- have you ever noticed that all non-horsey people always had a "black stallion" when they were growing up? We had one black stallion at my show barn in Florida... had that one casterated! ;)

I had a friend that is new to horses get on her soapbox about how cruel horsepeople can be. She said that she was going to the store and saw a pasture with a couple of horses. "That owner had blindfolded them! He also had blankets on them and it was like 90 degrees outside!" After snickering not so quietly, I had to explain that fly masks and fly sheets are totally normal and... no... the horses can see out, you just can't see in...
*sigh*

nlk
Jan. 13, 2010, 07:35 PM
saying a horse or rider "ribbioned"

I also "two- point" when me students are on course at the appropriate spots from the side lines

Mtn trails
Jan. 13, 2010, 09:06 PM
Last night I told my husband to "step" because he was in my way. :D

mybelle
Jan. 14, 2010, 01:18 PM
People always think I say "bar" when I mention the barn. :lol: :lol: :lol: Can't count the number of times I've asked "Will I see you at the bar later?" and eager bystanders are wanting to accompany us as well. Gotta love college. In high school we just got shocked looks :lol:

We have this same thread in the Eventing forum and people are forever thinking I'm saying "the bar"!

sptraining
Jan. 14, 2010, 01:42 PM
Riders have a 'footing' fetish. (Now how many people are ridiculously obsessed with the density of dirt on the ground, and it's composition)

Bolero
Jan. 14, 2010, 05:14 PM
Watching anything with legs to see if they move soundly. Esp if I am bored.


That is one of my all time favorites. I am contantly watching dogs that are on a walk thinking, he's totally off in the left hind. :)

How about:

"Sit on him" - ie: "Susie is going to sit on him" (him being the horse)

kookicat
Jan. 14, 2010, 06:08 PM
A few summers ago, I was looking at buying a yearling. I'd phoned my mum for something else during my break at work, and she had asked me about him. My side of the conversation went something like this: (Mother in brackets)

"Hey, I saw that coloured today. He's really cute. (Is he bay? He looks bay in the advert.) No, he's black. (I see. Does he still have his bits? You'd have to keep him away from Lilly and Asp) Nah, they gelded him, so no worries about any more babies!"

My very consertive boss walked past. :uhoh: Needless to say, he gave me a very strange look and and a request to come to his office! I had a hard time explaining that I wasn't being racist. :O I've been much more careful how I phrase things since then! :winkgrin:

NeverEnd
Jan. 14, 2010, 06:21 PM
"I sticked him today at 12.1" - referring to height measurements.

Mor4ward
Jan. 14, 2010, 06:42 PM
I clucked at my ex-wife for years to get out of my way before she caught on.

I once pulled into a gas station and asked the mechanic to fix a flat in my right hind tire.

When the car salesman phoned me to follow up on my 'satisfaction with the new vehicle', I told him, without thinking - that I felt the car was straight, forward and through!

JUMPERROUND
Jan. 15, 2010, 09:04 AM
oh I cluck at traffic and my dogs too! We had a girl at the barn who had "an electric seat" most of my non horsey friends couldn't get that one. Also cross cantering is not going sideways.

00Jumper
Jan. 15, 2010, 09:29 AM
Not really horsey lingo, but the non-horsey cracking me up. :lol: I live in a house with 4 other girls, only one of which has any horse experience (we used to ride together in high school) - I am the only one that rides currently. Every day I come home from the barn, the horsey friend asks me about my ride. Over break, we were approached by a non-horsey roommate who had the following request:

Roomie: Can you guys try to find different lingo when you talk about horses? [Jumper] always comes home and [horsey roomie] asks "Was Lola good pony?" and you always say "Lola was good pony!" and then you talk about flatting and collection and it's annoying. Can't you at least use a different opener?

:lol: We settled on "Was Lola good today?" "Why, yes, she was an absolutely sublime member of family Equidae today." :lol: We'll see how long it goes before that drives her crazy!

nlk
Jan. 15, 2010, 11:14 AM
I love when you go to a show and non-horse family/friends/co-workers asked if you won your race! Or some form there of. When you say "We did great we got a "XYZ" they are totally perplexed that you're thrilled you didn't exactly win!