PDA

View Full Version : Anyone read Cavaletti?



Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 10, 2010, 09:57 PM
http://www.vtosaddlery.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=VTO&Product_Code=CSOTHAROGPK&Category_Code=BKS

Just wondering if you got anything out of the book. Doing some book shopping since I am taking a month off from riding in Feb. I want this year to be a sponge and soak up all the knowledge I can. I have already seached the forums and found some great book suggestions, but I am wondering about the thoughts on this book!
Thanks!

CookiePony
Jan. 10, 2010, 10:39 PM
A classic! I have the old edition and would love to get the new edition with Ingrid Klimke's revisions.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 10, 2010, 10:51 PM
Thanks! I hope I can learn a lot from it! its on my list to begin reading!!!

SmartAlex
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:16 AM
I have it and found it to be very well written and informative. Plenty of photos to help with explanations and a great read.

rileyt
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:29 AM
It's a terrific book... with one giant caution:

This is written by Ingrid and Reiner Klimke. I'm sure you know who they are, but let's just say their dressage foundation is vastly superior to any of ours!

I often see (and hear about) people who get this book and then start doing all this crazy work over cavaletti... thinking it will strengthen their horse's back/muscles/whatever.

One thing that people seem to miss, is that in EVERY picture, the horses in the book are trotting cavaletti in a ROUND frame, LIFTING their back, and bringing their hind legs UNDERNEATH themselves. Frequently, when the exercises are duplicated with lesser riders and horses, the horse is hollow, and trailing their legs. THAT kind of cavaletti work is really harmful. Cavaletti work just increases the intensity of the training... for good or bad. GOOD cavaletti work can be twice as beneficial (as riding on the flat). But BAD cavaletti work can be twice as destructive.

So-- if you're dressage basics aren't firmly established,... wait until they are before you attempt this stuff. It's harder than it looks.

Ohter than that... its a GREAT book. Tons and tons of information in it.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 11, 2010, 11:32 AM
It's a terrific book... with one giant caution:

This is written by Ingrid and Reiner Klimke. I'm sure you know who they are, but let's just say their dressage foundation is vastly superior to any of ours!

I often see (and hear about) people who get this book and then start doing all this crazy work over cavaletti... thinking it will strengthen their horse's back/muscles/whatever.

One thing that people seem to miss, is that in EVERY picture, the horses in the book are trotting cavaletti in a ROUND frame, LIFTING their back, and bringing their hind legs UNDERNEATH themselves. Frequently, when the exercises are duplicated with lesser riders and horses, the horse is hollow, and trailing their legs. THAT kind of cavaletti work is really harmful. Cavaletti work just increases the intensity of the training... for good or bad. GOOD cavaletti work can be twice as beneficial (as riding on the flat). But BAD cavaletti work can be twice as destructive.

So-- if you're dressage basics aren't firmly established,... wait until they are before you attempt this stuff. It's harder than it looks.

Ohter than that... its a GREAT book. Tons and tons of information in it.


Thank you for this! I am ashamed to say, I really had no idea. I would have assumed the cavaletti work would help to make a round frame! It does make sense if you stop and think about it though! Again, Thank you!

Kareen
Jan. 11, 2010, 11:39 AM
I love it. It is among the first books I have owned (the old version before Ingrid Klimke made her contribution) and I can highly recommend it for both the training of riders and horses. Whether you are a student or a trainer it will have valuable knowledge and I've found it inspiring for all the year's I've had it.

rileyt
Jan. 11, 2010, 11:44 AM
Thank you for this! I am ashamed to say, I really had no idea. I would have assumed the cavaletti work would help to make a round frame! It does make sense if you stop and think about it though! Again, Thank you!

Nope. Think about it this way...

Stage one: Get your horse round, through, and lifting his back on the flat

Stage two: Get your horse round, through, and lifting his back over cavaletti

Stage two is harder than stage one, and shouldn't be attempted until stage one is confirmed. Doing it over cavaletti prematurely won't help him come round, it will just make him sore and frustrated. Doing cavaletti won't make a horse round if he hasn't mastered it on the flat.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 11, 2010, 11:54 AM
Nope. Think about it this way...

Stage one: Get your horse round, through, and lifting his back on the flat

Stage two: Get your horse round, through, and lifting his back over cavaletti

Stage two is harder than stage one, and shouldn't be attempted until stage one is confirmed. Doing it over cavaletti prematurely won't help him come round, it will just make him sore and frustrated. Doing cavaletti won't make a horse round if he hasn't mastered it on the flat.

Makes perfect sense now!

Blugal
Jan. 11, 2010, 12:55 PM
Although, if you have some idea of feel and a good instructor, poles on the ground (i.e. precursors to cavaletti) and small cavaletti can in fact help a horse to learn about forward and down, stretching, and going round.

Pat Burgess has a nice exercise where you start by laying out 8-10 poles in a quarter circle and trot through them, first at regular trot, then trying shorter (more to the inside) then longer (more to the outside) - the precursors to collected trot and medium trot. Rider must stay out of the way and only encourage softness and rhythm in the horse's carriage before and after the poles. After doing this exercise with several young horses (and all the schooled horses too) in her clinic, two of them had lightbulb moments - probably the lack of rider interference and the curve and the lifting of their feet and looking at the poles to organize themselves all contributed to them loosening their backs and then stretching forward and down.