PDA

View Full Version : Is there a market in the free lease area for..



Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:08 AM
I have posted about my horse a few times. The one I really dont have time for, but love dearly, but also needs work. Well she turns 8 in april. She doesnt cost much to keep around so yes, I can keep her around and waste away, but I really dont want my horse to waste away. I also dont want to give her away. I believe if I had just a few months with her, I could easily get what I have put into her, back out of her, but I really dont have that time. I would like to find a free lease home for her, but she needs an experienced rider. IDK how long the free lease would be. Atleast the next two or so years if they want it, but its not a forever lease. I feel like it isnt right to have someone work with her for that long and then not keep her. Of course she is for sale, so if the match is right they would have an option to buy. Is this common to find someone to lease a horse like this?
Thanks for helping.

Toadie's mom
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:18 AM
You can correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like your horse is green. Some people (myself included) believe that someone who wants to free-lease a green horse, is looking for free training. I've free leased 2 horses to jr. riders. One trained 1st level dressage and baby green hunter (and they only wanted to do dressage). The other was a preliminary event horse with a minor soundness issue that continued to do nov. and trng. with the jr. A lot of people who are looking to lease want a horse to get some experience on prior to buying their very own:)

Scaramouch
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:23 AM
I think that you might have better luck selling her outright. For what she's worth at the moment, which doesn't sound like a lot. Right now there are many nice horses being given away and free lease horses that are ready to show now. I don't think too many people are going to be lining up to "free lease" something that they're going to end up basically training and conditioning for free, only to give back to you.

What do you mean by "waste away?" She isn't going to literally shrivel up and die sitting at pasture for a few more years, and 10-12 is still perfectly young enough to bring back into competitive shape. It honestly sounds like you should just sell her/give her away because you may or may not have time for her in two years or whenever, especially if you've graduated from college and are trying to make a living either as a pro or in the real world. Or you could just be content with her sitting in a field eating, since you say she isn't costing you anything...

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:36 AM
I think that you might have better luck selling her outright. For what she's worth at the moment, which doesn't sound like a lot. Right now there are many nice horses being given away and free lease horses that are ready to show now. I don't think too many people are going to be lining up to "free lease" something that they're going to end up basically training and conditioning for free, only to give back to you.

What do you mean by "waste away?" She isn't going to literally shrivel up and die sitting at pasture for a few more years, and 10-12 is still perfectly young enough to bring back into competitive shape. It honestly sounds like you should just sell her/give her away because you may or may not have time for her in two years or whenever, especially if you've graduated from college and are trying to make a living either as a pro or in the real world. Or you could just be content with her sitting in a field eating, since you say she isn't costing you anything...

You really dont think 10 is too old to bring back?

And she is greenish.. if she is ridden consistently she is awesome. It only takes her about 2 or 3 weeks to get back to where we left off, but when she is out of work she gets really hot and is a pain to deal with.

When I had her in work, she was rounding nicely in all three gaits, flying changes, basic lateral work, lengthens gaits. I never started her on jumping, because i never thought id want to jump her.

I understand no one wanting to train a lease, but I know there are some kids who cant afford to have a horse, so leasing a horse is their only option. IDK.. I really have no clue how this works, thats why I am asking. I love working with different horses of all walks. I have taken on some horse to train and never made a dime off of them, but I enjoyed doing it and I wanted practice at working with many horses. Just was wondering if there were other kids like me.

Auburn
Jan. 9, 2010, 09:22 AM
If you have a local Pony Club in your area, you could contact them. They might know of someone who needs a project.

Otherwise, 10 years old is not too old. There are many OTTB's that start their next career later in life. A horse really isn't considered in their prime, until they are 15 or 16. JMHO.

yellowbritches
Jan. 9, 2010, 09:37 AM
I would sell this horse, and sooner than later.

Here's why. If you're idea is to lease her for a couple of years and then take her back, you ARE basically getting free training (and depending on the agreement, free care, free vet and farrier bills, etc, etc, etc). At the end of 2 years, you'll be able to take back a going horse and suddenly someone who has put 2 years of effort (and money) into a horse and is just beginning to go somewhere with it is out a ride. That sucks....even if they agree to the deal in the beginning (humans don't necessarily have the gift of thinking things through to the end most of the time!).

So, I would either sell her and cut your losses, or give her away to a forever home and move along. Or, PAY someone to train her and ride her so that when you are ready for her, there are no hard feelings.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 9, 2010, 11:34 AM
Thanks everyone. I already plan to put my full attention on her come may and HOPEFULLY since im not working too much this summer I can get her to come along way and have her sold by July.

My only problem with giving her away (besides losing money), is how do I know she is going to a forever home? How do I not know that those people arent just going to take her and try to make a profit off her and then she end up in a kill pen somewhere? Yes, I tend to think the worst of thoughts, but its very possible and around where I live this happens often. Someone takes in a free horse and then turns out they cant handle them, they try to sell them and then they end up on a truck to mexico!

Beam Me Up
Jan. 9, 2010, 11:56 AM
Agree with others that getting someone to pay expenses on and train a horse for someone else is a challenge.

If your goal is to have her ridden (as opposed to having someone else pay her expenses), could you offer her as a free ride? (As in, you continue to board her, someone else rides her) You should be able to find a competent high schooler/young adult who can't afford their own horse.

I did that a lot in college--owners were happy to have their horse trained/exercised, I was happy to ride while broke.

If you want someone else to be paying expenses then it may be easier to sell her than lease her. I share your fears about giving away horses into the unknown, and don't really have good advice--get references, trust your gut, don't advertise her as free (like, ask 1500 but be very flexible if you like the people). The sad truth is that as soon as we let horses out of our control, well, they aren't in our control anymore. Then again, we can't keep them all.

RAyers
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:03 PM
I might suggest this, having done this before successfully. Do a free lease to somebody but have in the contract that they have the right to buy the horse outright at a predetermined price. At the same time the lease is set in stone. That is we make it for a very specific time limit at which we all walk away or I buy the horse.

I free leased horses knowing that I am giving them training and adding value but I let the owner know that if the horse has the potential to go where I want, I intend to buy the horse. If not, they get get back a horse that is worth more than when it started. This way all parties know what can happen before getting into anything. I still keep horse shopping but have a horse and they get a horse off the payroll.

Reed

Ibex
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:09 PM
With the right connections, you could possibly make it work, especially for a pony-clubber type.

I think you'd have to spend that 2-4 weeks to get her in shape first, and then start looking.

Another idea... once she's going again would she work for a trainer as a "lease" horse? Not a schoolie, but one that a rider or two could lease from the trainer. You might have more luck with that type of situation, AND you know she's being kept under supervision.

lcw579
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:22 PM
I agree with the others that suggested finding a ponyclubber or other teen who needs a horse but can't afford one. These days there are plenty around. If you can still pay her bills and just need her ridden then that would be a win/win situation. If you are worried about who the rider trains with, you can always stipulate that when you give the kid the ride.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:25 PM
I dont mind paying for feed and hay and vet and farrier bills, but I cant afford to pay for her board. I have my own place and dont pay board now. If i could afford to pay board I would take her with me to school and the problem would be solved. I guess I should say that technically I do have the time for her, but I dont have the extra money to pay to board her at the barn I use while I am at school.

I guess I will just reasses the issue in the summer.

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:29 PM
I might suggest this, having done this before successfully. Do a free lease to somebody but have in the contract that they have the right to buy the horse outright at a predetermined price. At the same time the lease is set in stone. That is we make it for a very specific time limit at which we all walk away or I buy the horse.

I free leased horses knowing that I am giving them training and adding value but I let the owner know that if the horse has the potential to go where I want, I intend to buy the horse. If not, they get get back a horse that is worth more than when it started. This way all parties know what can happen before getting into anything. I still keep horse shopping but have a horse and they get a horse off the payroll.

Reed


This would be my ideal situation. I would love for her to go to a new home where I know she will be well cared for. How do I find someone willing to do this?

RAyers
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:32 PM
This would be my ideal situation. I would love for her to go to a new home where I know she will be well cared for. How do I find someone willing to do this?


I'm in Colorado. ;)

Reed

yellowbritches
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:34 PM
I might suggest this, having done this before successfully. Do a free lease to somebody but have in the contract that they have the right to buy the horse outright at a predetermined price. At the same time the lease is set in stone. That is we make it for a very specific time limit at which we all walk away or I buy the horse.

I free leased horses knowing that I am giving them training and adding value but I let the owner know that if the horse has the potential to go where I want, I intend to buy the horse. If not, they get get back a horse that is worth more than when it started. This way all parties know what can happen before getting into anything. I still keep horse shopping but have a horse and they get a horse off the payroll.

Reed
This is a very good way of doing things and I'll have to file it away in my head for a later use. Question: So, you set the price at the beginning of the lease...do you take into consideration how much money the leasee puts into the horse and subtract it against the agreed upon price?

OP, I came across harsh earlier, but, really, free leasing this horse with the intent of taking her back in a year or two really is going to be a tough, tricky, and potentially painful ordeal. It is one thing to free lease for a set amount of time a horse that you love that has something to offer someone (A good packer, etc), but it is another to say "here, take my horse, train her, pay for her upkeep, but I want her back in X amount of time."

So, I think your options outside of leasing her are:
Sell her.
Give her away (contracts can be written so that you can stipulate that she comes right back to you if they can't keep her).
Let her sit until you have the time to deal with her.
Pay someone to ride her.
Offer her as a free ride at your place, but you continue to cover her expenses (there are multiple ways of doing this, too).

Good luck. I may PM you my less than fabulous experience in free leasing a horse later today.

RAyers
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:38 PM
This is a very good way of doing things and I'll have to file it away in my head for a later use. Question: So, you set the price at the beginning of the lease...do you take into consideration how much money the leasee puts into the horse and subtract it against the agreed upon price?


Definitely a discount is put into the price as the result of the fact I am taking on some of the costs of the animal. For example, my old boy, Shiver, was priced at $12K but the owner was so desperate to get out from under him she agreed to lease him to me for a year but we also agreed that his price to me would be $8K and that I could have terms to make payments towards his purchase during the lease should I desire.

Reed

Carol Ames
Jan. 9, 2010, 03:28 PM
try offering her with a free lease / purchase:cool: option.:yes:

Rescue_Rider9
Jan. 9, 2010, 04:18 PM
try offering her with a free lease / purchase:cool: option.:yes:

Thats what i am going to try to do.