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ellem
Jan. 7, 2010, 11:41 AM
Reasonable timeframe from start to show?

Go Fish
Jan. 7, 2010, 01:41 PM
I think a year is reasonable. I base that on the fact that you already know how to RIDE. I rode western for many years and there are pitfalls to overcome...old habits die hard and I still find myself doing "western" things while riding hunters. It makes my trainer pull his hair out.

The horse you have makes all the difference when you're starting out. Showing a "been there, done that" horse who is very forgiving of your mistakes will serve you well.

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jan. 7, 2010, 01:51 PM
Well I took the last year-two years off for dressage (and then last fall for feet issues) and am starting the horse after 2 mos pasture pet on Sunday (if over 20 degrees) and plan to show mid March...schooling show. April may do a rated (like rusty stirrup)...we'll play it by ear. Could be ugly. ;)

Good news is he lives outside and the group moves, so he's not in bad shape.

My point, if I ever get there, is it is going to depend on the following:
What the horse already knows
What you already know
Your level of physical fitness (how hard you can work in lessons)--this is my biggest problem right now...I'm over 30 w/a desk job, couch lover and bad knee
How many lessons you can take with a good trainer a week

I don't think a year to show 2'6" is unreasonable at all. I would think you could do some schooling shows by mid to end of summer.

Do you have a good trainer? What does he/she think?

GGsuperpony
Jan. 7, 2010, 03:21 PM
I think almost anyone with decent amount of dedication and a horse without major issues can learn to jump a 2' course with at least simple changes within a year, so if you have dedication and a willing horse, the short answer is yes.

Things you should do:

Read Hunter Seat Equitation by George Morris if you haven't already. If you've already read the book, audit one of his clinics to learn even more.
Read 101 Jumping Exercises and see if your trainer will show you how to work through some of the exercises.
Use the ground pole exercises in the 101 Jumping Exercises book to learn new things and challenge yourself in between lessons until you're ready to jump on your own.
Learn about distances between fences and setting up jumps/courses/gymnastic exercises - the Pony Club Manual (available on Amazon) is a great reference for this as is the 101 Jumping Exercises book. Although you've been riding for years, you'll need to fill this gap in your riding education since you're just starting to do over-fences work.

Pitfalls to avoid:

Don't show without experienced help or a trainer. The show day is run very differently from an AQHA show and you don't want to learn the ropes at the same time you're trying to learn to show over fences. Structure your show day so that all you have to think about is dressing yourself, tacking up, and riding. Tell your helper to make his or her mantra, "I'll take care of that. Just focus on your riding."
Don't jump without a trainer at first. It's too easy to learn bad habits and to teach your horse bad habits. Even if you bought The Ultimate Packer, the horse can only be as good as the rider. Remember, you're always training the horse even when you're just riding the horse, and repeated mistakes can and will stick with you both. When in doubt, ask your trainer for "homework" so you have a plan for every ride.
Don't wait until you're "better" to show or to take a lesson with a bigger trainer. You only get better through practice and if showing is your goal, you have to practice showing too, anti-crossrail-snobs be damned. :yes:

Others may disagree, but I think the only way to improve in the show ring is to show early and often, as long as you can afford to do so while continuing your training. Once you can consistently, safely negotiate a crossrail course at home, ask your trainer if you're ready to attend a one-day local show.

Show regularly and by the time you get to 2', you'll be comfortable in the ring and able to focus on your riding, not on learning the ropes. In the course of all that showing, too, your horse will see all sorts of things like bicycles, loose dogs, screaming kids, and a big variety of spooky jumps, which will desensitize him and teach you how to respond to anything that tends to set him off. Showing as often as your budget allows is a win-win.

Most of all, good luck and have fun! You're going to learn a ton so enjoy it!

TrotTrotPumpkn
Jan. 8, 2010, 10:02 AM
I think almost anyone with decent amount of dedication and a horse without major issues can learn to jump a 2' course with at least simple changes within a year, so if you have dedication and a willing horse, the short answer is yes.

Things you should do:

Read Hunter Seat Equitation by George Morris if you haven't already. If you've already read the book, audit one of his clinics to learn even more.
Read 101 Jumping Exercises and see if your trainer will show you how to work through some of the exercises.
Use the ground pole exercises in the 101 Jumping Exercises book to learn new things and challenge yourself in between lessons until you're ready to jump on your own.
Learn about distances between fences and setting up jumps/courses/gymnastic exercises - the Pony Club Manual (available on Amazon) is a great reference for this as is the 101 Jumping Exercises book. Although you've been riding for years, you'll need to fill this gap in your riding education since you're just starting to do over-fences work.

Pitfalls to avoid:

Don't show without experienced help or a trainer. The show day is run very differently from an AQHA show and you don't want to learn the ropes at the same time you're trying to learn to show over fences. Structure your show day so that all you have to think about is dressing yourself, tacking up, and riding. Tell your helper to make his or her mantra, "I'll take care of that. Just focus on your riding."
Don't jump without a trainer at first. It's too easy to learn bad habits and to teach your horse bad habits. Even if you bought The Ultimate Packer, the horse can only be as good as the rider. Remember, you're always training the horse even when you're just riding the horse, and repeated mistakes can and will stick with you both. When in doubt, ask your trainer for "homework" so you have a plan for every ride.
Don't wait until you're "better" to show or to take a lesson with a bigger trainer. You only get better through practice and if showing is your goal, you have to practice showing too, anti-crossrail-snobs be damned. :yes:

Others may disagree, but I think the only way to improve in the show ring is to show early and often, as long as you can afford to do so while continuing your training. Once you can consistently, safely negotiate a crossrail course at home, ask your trainer if you're ready to attend a one-day local show.

Show regularly and by the time you get to 2', you'll be comfortable in the ring and able to focus on your riding, not on learning the ropes. In the course of all that showing, too, your horse will see all sorts of things like bicycles, loose dogs, screaming kids, and a big variety of spooky jumps, which will desensitize him and teach you how to respond to anything that tends to set him off. Showing as often as your budget allows is a win-win.

Most of all, good luck and have fun! You're going to learn a ton so enjoy it!

I totally agree. That was my point about going to a schooling show already in March (we may just do baby stuff, but we will be getting out). Not saying you want to do that in March though. [Should clarify my horse is schooling second level dressage--so we aren't talking about the same thing]. A good trainer will be your key. One who can train you and if they need to do a few more rides on your horse--one who can do that as well.

I wanted to add that another good book is: The Complete Guide to Hunter Seat Training, Showing, and Judging: On the Flat and Over Fences (Paperback)
~ Anna Jane White-Mullin

Keep us updated--love to see pics!

findeight
Jan. 8, 2010, 10:22 AM
...
Trainer seems to think that I should have be doing 2' courses within 6 months of the horse purchase, but didn't anticipate my desire to have the horse broke on the flat...I was having so many issues with the horse dropping in on turns, not wanting to stop, and running around like a half-broke 3-year-old that I took a jumping hiatus until he gets his stop, go, turn, and rate buttons fixed.

Oh dear. Are you saying trainer wanted you to advance to actual courses without this horse being broke on the flat?

Maybe 2 issues here. Not just the simple "how long does it take?".

But the answer is, if you start with a well broke horse? 2' courses pretty darn quick, 2'6" within a year. At most. It's the basic getting them really broke that is time consuming, not adding jumps to already competent flatwork.

GGsuperpony
Jan. 8, 2010, 01:29 PM
Ellem, in what area do you live? Maybe others can suggest small shows. That's a good place to trainer-shop too, since you can see what's available without feeling pressured to commit like sometimes happens during farm visits.