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View Full Version : Horse sale sites overseas



jmjhp
Jan. 4, 2010, 04:10 PM
What are some good sales barns / web sites to look at overseas?

Tha Ridge
Jan. 4, 2010, 04:37 PM
Benny de Ruiter has some lovely horses - http://www.bennyderuiterstables.com/

*horsiejumper*
Jan. 7, 2010, 02:51 AM
Any others???

Ray
Jan. 7, 2010, 06:35 AM
Julie Ulrich in France. American who moved there, has connections all over Europe. She is at WEF Jan-March, PM me for contact info

kookicat
Jan. 7, 2010, 06:55 AM
Overseas where? :)

Here are a few English ones

www.horsequest.co.uk
www.horsemart.co.uk
www.horsedeals.co.uk/

huntereq7
Jan. 7, 2010, 07:22 AM
http://www.waldmanhorses.com/_html/main.php?taal=en&page=home

http://www.cme-horses.de/

Justice
Jan. 7, 2010, 07:18 PM
If you are ready to buy something, pm me. I have a brilliant contact, but he does not have a website.

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Jan. 7, 2010, 09:25 PM
Julie Ulrich in France. American who moved there, has connections all over Europe. She is at WEF Jan-March, PM me for contact info

In response to this, I would be interested to hear about the type of business she is receiving. I speak fluent German and my husband was born and raised in Berlin. I lived there for about a year, and we are considering a move back to Germany at some point. Pending actual contacts (which are absolutely a necessity, of course), is there a spot in the market for American "liaisons" abroad? I've heard horror stories of people in the US getting "duped" by foreign sellers in things like PPEs, etc. and wonder if a bilingual intermediary would be something people would be interested in. IIRC, there is a service in the US doing just this, but I've not done too much investigation of the actual structure of the business. Of course, reputable sellers that have good contacts in the US will always be reliable sources abroad, but I imagine they can be cost-prohibitive to some buyers. There is still such a wonderful market in Europe for horses that don't fit the bill for popular disciplines like dressage and jumpers, but that would make lovely hunters/eq horses. Sellers lacking a knowledge in these disciplines often become goldmines for Americans shopping abroad.

I suppose this type of service could be beneficial to those looking at sales horses "off the beaten path" as it would ensure the buyer had a representative competent in both places. With the market and requirements of buyers in the US being so different from those in Europe, it seems as if it might be helpful?

LowerSaxony_Jumper
Jan. 8, 2010, 02:30 AM
You can also contact the home offices of the breeding clubs. They always know who has a horse to sell and often they can come with you and help you with all stuff. The Holsteiner Verband in Neum√ľnster has it's own selling stable also does the Hannoverian department in Hessen.

Depending of what you are looking for I could give you some names of breeders here in Germany.

Kareen
Jan. 8, 2010, 07:31 AM
The goldmine days are definitely over. Also horses worth importing to the US nearly invariably are of the quality that is sought for on both sides of the pond. And why spend money on bringing substandard horses into the country?
The benefit of a trustworthy bilingual rep. is probably unargued however there are plenty of businesses who are already in the market and depending on what your expectations are in the business you may find it very difficult to get going unless you can offer more than just one or two things the buyer and seller don't possess (e.g. being bilingual, having foto and video equipment and knowing how to handle it).
The reason why I think my own little company is still growing these days is because I run an all in one operation. Veterinary practice, studfarm with boarding and agenting. I've been doing this for only 7yrs and even in this short timespan I have seen a lot of new agents come and go and most of them quit after one or two years because they are disappointed in the success. It takes a lot of passion and experience to do this in the long run and quite honestly just like with training barns I see an awful lot of agencies who shouldn't be in business.
Nowadays the problem is not in locating the horses. Back in the early 90's it was but nowadays if the individual breeders don't have their own website at least the breeding clubs all have them and you can easily call someone who can link you to a gazillion of breeders or training barns. It's the wading through the horses and steering clear of all the dishonesty on both sides of the world that is the challenge.

EqHntrJmpr
Jan. 8, 2010, 08:29 AM
I bought a horse from Tenerife Stables in the Czech Republic and they were phenomenal! They have a great variety of beautiful horses and are extremely helpful in making all the arrangements. Everything went so smoothly.

http://www.tenerifestables.com/

FrenchFrytheEqHorse
Jan. 8, 2010, 11:44 AM
The goldmine days are definitely over. Also horses worth importing to the US nearly invariably are of the quality that is sought for on both sides of the pond. And why spend money on bringing substandard horses into the country?
The benefit of a trustworthy bilingual rep. is probably unargued however there are plenty of businesses who are already in the market and depending on what your expectations are in the business you may find it very difficult to get going unless you can offer more than just one or two things the buyer and seller don't possess (e.g. being bilingual, having foto and video equipment and knowing how to handle it).
The reason why I think my own little company is still growing these days is because I run an all in one operation. Veterinary practice, studfarm with boarding and agenting. I've been doing this for only 7yrs and even in this short timespan I have seen a lot of new agents come and go and most of them quit after one or two years because they are disappointed in the success. It takes a lot of passion and experience to do this in the long run and quite honestly just like with training barns I see an awful lot of agencies who shouldn't be in business.
Nowadays the problem is not in locating the horses. Back in the early 90's it was but nowadays if the individual breeders don't have their own website at least the breeding clubs all have them and you can easily call someone who can link you to a gazillion of breeders or training barns. It's the wading through the horses and steering clear of all the dishonesty on both sides of the world that is the challenge.

Kareen, thank you so much for this lengthy post. It's exactly what I was looking for. Do you also do things the other way around (ie, bringing European buyers to the US)? As far as I understand it, there are more and more buyers importing American horses, especially as the Euro is so strong at this point.

MissIndependence
Jan. 9, 2010, 12:45 AM
Check out www.sporthorses-online.de. They have some wonderful jumpers....and are very quick to respond and work with you. Annie Dottoli (sp?) is over there and does sales/buying trips for Americans. I have several friends who have bought wonderful horses thru her although I don't think I have her contact info - but have heard nothing but great comments. I do agree that the value of our dollar right now is horrible - so doubt you are going to get any "deals" there. Probably better prices and selection here at this point......unless you just want the fun of looking over there and bringing one home. The problems are obvious though - if you're not dealing with a "known" commodity - then you are taking huge risks.

RyuEquestrian
Jan. 9, 2010, 11:07 AM
Thanks for these guys, they came in hand for me too! I've got a horse overseas that I'm looking in placing and I'll try some of these sites out!