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CDE Driver
Jan. 3, 2010, 05:25 PM
Can someone tell me if there are qualifications one needs to meet prior to becoming an eventing judge?

I know that in order to enter the USDF learner judge program you must have three score of at least 60% at second level.

Just doing some research on the different associations....

Thanks.

secretariat
Jan. 3, 2010, 05:54 PM
For US national events:
http://www.usef.org/documents/licensedOfficials/LicenseForms/EventingTrainingProgramInformation.pdf

CDE Driver
Jan. 3, 2010, 06:20 PM
Oh, thank you! I knew I could count on you all! I looked on the USEA site and couldn't find the pertinent information.

JFS
Jan. 3, 2010, 08:39 PM
So secretariat, since you had that link at your fingertips does that mean that you're thinking of becoming a licensed official? I would hire you :)

Jackie

scubed
Jan. 3, 2010, 11:15 PM
If you don't want to look through everything, the basic quals are to have ridden 2 or more horses at 4 or more prelim or above horse trials and been involved in organizing preferably as organizer or secretary of a horse trials. I did the "slow track" version to a 'r' TD license. I took the 4 day class in June 2007, did my first apprenticeship that summer then rode my second prelim horse in 2008, then did the rest of my apprenticing. Took final exam in October 2008 and got my license in May 2009. there was not good coordination between when the final exam was scheduled an when you had to have stuff to USEF for review. Good luck if you are planning to do it. Everyone is very helpful. Feel free to PM me if you have any specific questions I can answer as someone who has gone through recently.

CDE Driver
Jan. 4, 2010, 01:13 AM
Oh heavens no, I'm not planning on doing it!

I am just doing some research on the various associations. The American Driving Assoc. requires no practical experience to apply to the learner judge program. As you can imagine that can lead to some "interesting" judging. :)

secretariat
Jan. 4, 2010, 07:06 PM
Officials are sanctioned by the USEF, not the USEA.

Wow, Jackie, I'm quite honestly flattered at the thought. I took the MSEDA officials class that Karen Winn and Katie Lindsay gave several years ago, and thought it absolutely top drawer - we need to do more of those as an educational activity, even if (like me) the students never turn it into licenses. Both Karen and Katie are outstanding teachers. Hadn't given it another thought until now, but .... since I'm probably retiring in 2011 ..... HMMMMMM. Darn you, another way to waste my time and money!!

Actually, I had the link because Megan's working on her license; she just took the dressage symposium at Waredaca -- BTW, that was very well done also but it's tough to take 4 days away from your business (that's maybe 10-15 lessons missed, or more). Our strategic plan calls for her to complete her ICP certification (accomplished 2008 through level II), start our breeding program (first 5 babies on the ground in 2009), and get either judge's or TD certification (she's working on it, hopefully be in position for testing in 2010). As you well know, although the other readers may not recognize it, riding doesn't pay the bills for 99.9% of us, so if we're going to stay in the sport, we've either got to be rich (ooops, messed that one up) or find something to reverse the cash flow!!

secretariat
Jan. 4, 2010, 07:09 PM
Scubed -- look a little closer, it's not that stringent any more. You no longer have to RIDE at that level, you just need to get a couple of Prelim riders to say you COACHED them at that level. I'm personally not very happy with that clause, and I would encourage discussion on the topic.

fooler
Jan. 4, 2010, 07:33 PM
Scubed -- look a little closer, it's not that stringent any more. You no longer have to RIDE at that level, you just need to get a couple of Prelim riders to say you COACHED them at that level. I'm personally not very happy with that clause, and I would encourage discussion on the topic.

That has been one of the requirements for as long as I remember. Also when I started my TD process, I had to provide proof, signed by the organizers, of the work I had done at events, take a written test, plus provide a list of some 15-25 horsemen/officials who would vouch for me as a possible TD.
Then and only then was I considered as a candidate. Don't know if it is exactly the same today, but I know the initial training is more than when I got my license.

retreadeventer
Jan. 4, 2010, 07:56 PM
I believe it is RIDE or TRAIN horses/riders at that level, not specifically coach - they want to see that you have definable experience at the level or above. In order to prove that, my understanding from the USEF was that I had to be signatory on entry blank, and my prelim and interm. rides from the 80's would count. (Yeah!)
And the rides must be completions as per the rules which would mean with certain dressage scores, and under the requisite cross country and stadium penalties for a "completion", whether they are you as a rider or you as a trainer. Trainer denotes responsibility for the horse and is more important than just being a coach, which is not responsible for the horse at a recognized competition.

JFS
Jan. 4, 2010, 08:18 PM
Actually I'm very pleased that there is a requirement to have been involved with running events. I remember way back when most officials didn't have a clue what it takes to run an event and the USEF didn't think it was important :)

And Howard I think you would be a good TD :)

Jackie

Badger
Jan. 4, 2010, 09:15 PM
If you read the linked info, it is ride, trained, or coached.

scubed
Jan. 4, 2010, 09:27 PM
Mea Culpa, yes it was ride, train or coach even when I did it, but since I am a total adult amateur, only the ridden part applied to me and is therefore what is at the top of my head.