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View Full Version : Successful H/J/Eq horses that started as eventers



Beau Cheval
Dec. 31, 2009, 03:40 PM
This post goes hand-in-hand with my post on the eventing board, but I want to get both sides opinions.

As the title says, can you give me some stories/information on horses that have successfully started as eventers and transitioned to successful h/j/eq careers? My potential employer for this summer is an eventing trainer and would like me to have my own horse during my time with her, which is pleasantly surprising to a former H/J working student :lol: But because of where I live and the limited eventing crowd, if I did a long term lease or purchased a horse he/she would have to make the successful transition to the H/J world, and I mean successful enough for me to qualify for NEEC, which is a goal of mine (or if they were just going to be a superstar in the Hunter or Jumper rings (A shows) I would be delighted). I'm going to look for something for just the summer, but somehow that doesn't seem realistic.

Thanks!

bornfreenowexpensive
Dec. 31, 2009, 03:52 PM
ummm...I'm an eventer now but was a jumper. I didn't see your post in eventing but a nice horse is a nice horse. All of mine that I have sold over the years went on to be very successful jumpers...one was sold as a hunter. Actually...only one out of about 10 I have sold was sold to stay an eventer.

And by jumpers...two were doing the FL circuit 4'9"+ jumpers. The others were more 3'6 horses. And the "hunter" did the local stuff with a kid and then adult ammy (could win the hack anywhere but didn't have the form for the A shows over fences...but great mind and a good all rounder).

I know of many others who have been sold as equitation horses. There is at least one current GP jumper that was an Advanced level eventer currently competiting. One of the sons of A Fine Romance.

Eventing now a days has REALLY nice horses. To be competitive, they need to be really good movers, good jumpers and very ridable.

So look for a nice quality horse...and give him a good start ...and just because you do some eventing will not ruin him for another job if he has a good mind, movement and jump.

JER
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:01 PM
Abdullah started out in eventing.

He turned out to be a reasonably successful showjumper. (:D)

Also, Bold Minstrel. Olympics in eventing and an outstanding SJ career later.

This thread (http://chronofhorse.com/forum/showthread.php?t=139220) has more.

bornfreenowexpensive
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:04 PM
Abdullah started out in eventing.
.


I did not know that! Bet he didn't care much for the dressage!

ponies123
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:05 PM
If it were something that were competitive in eventing, it would probably be more on the jumper/equitation side of the spectrum in the future rather than a possible hunter, IME. If I was looking for an eq. horse I would definitely consider buying from an eventing trainer that puts a lot of emphasis on the dressage phase. The stadium jumping phase in eventing at the lower levels is certainly not as technical (in my opinion) as straight jumper classes, but it is a good basis especially if it is a horse that has been brought up right with great dressage training. A good horse is a good horse and a good jumper is a good jumper. You can shine it up for whatever direction you would like to go, but as long as you have a good eye for picking something out that doesn't jump dangerous or ugly you will probably wind up with something nice at least for the lower levels of USEF jumpers and eq.

If I was in the market for a very competitive hunter, an eventing barn would not be my first place to look because the horses generally move and jump differently. But I wouldn't turn it away if a horse I thought suitable was with an eventing trainer.

Beau Cheval
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:11 PM
That's what I thought, just wanted to make sure.

It would seem to me that it would be hugely beneficial to the horse to have a foundation in dressage and practice their strength, handiness, and bravery early on.

Thanks, and I'd love to see pictures and hear more personal stories. That thread was great btw.

Renn/aissance
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:45 PM
Lion King is a great example; he started off eventing but became a wonderful hunter. I believe his owner's COTH username is Mestel.

One that became a good equitation horse, and I believe went to medal finals, was Beall na Blath (whose name I'm sure I butchered.) Yellowbritches could tell you more about him.

My horse Tipperary (http://i562.photobucket.com/albums/ss65/2tipperary/Tipperary/Brushlarge-1.jpg) went up to Prelim. I did the big eqs on him and now we play around in the adult eq and jumpers. I won't say he's fancy, but he is a really good egg and a good all-around horse. He can cross over to the hunters and get good ribbons locally, so long as we don't flat ;) but gets bored doing that and really prefers the jumpers and eq. He's pretty laid-back so you wouldn't think he had the get up and go to be a successful eventer... until you take him cross-country! My Children's hunter, Renaissance (http://i562.photobucket.com/albums/ss65/2tipperary/Renaissance/wihs1.jpg), also started out as an eventer, but he went BN and N only before the rider quit in favor of playing soccer. His trainer at that time sold him as a hunter and 3' eq horse after he won a local medal final, and he was a very good Children's hunter type. Bonus to the event-trained horses: their flatwork is usually to die for!

RegentLion
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:55 PM
On a more low-level scale...

I had a mare that I bought as a youngster that I DESPERATELY wanted to event. She'd school ditches and water but in competition she'd balk and I couldn't get her through. We schooled Novice and some Training questions.

She was sold on to a young rider who did well and successfully on a nice local hunter circuit. They did especially well in classes that were on "outside" courses or went from one ring to another or anything that was weird. She was great in sloppy footing and had an excellent jumping technique, bold and brave.

Her movement on the flat was questionable (due to her weirdo breeding) and that is probably large part in why she stayed at lower levels as her technique was really really pretty. It can be done! Some horses just like the hunter ring better, I know mine did.

Sing Mia Song
Dec. 31, 2009, 05:01 PM
Renn, Tip and Lion were the first ones that leapt to mind for me. I didn't realize Beal na Blath also started out life as an eventer.

I've known quite a few that started out as eventers and became solid eq horses, although they've become less commonplace as the trend toward warmbloods in equitation has grown over the last 20-odd years.

Vandy
Dec. 31, 2009, 07:38 PM
Renn, Tip and Lion were the first ones that leapt to mind for me.
You mean Cecil wasn't the first one that leapt to mind for you?! I know, it was a long time ago :)

Cecil was my big eq horse, and it was a long time ago, but he was wonderful. Very brave. We also dabbled in the junior jumpers. He was the heavier type of TB that everyone asked what kind of warmblood he was.

I am about to go look at an event horse for one of my clients who is shopping for a hunter. Personally I think the eventing world is a great place to look for h/j prospects as if they've done some eventing IME they are generally brave, well broke on the flat, and not ridiculously overpriced.

tarheelmd07
Dec. 31, 2009, 08:54 PM
I'll give you my personal examples - on a low/mid level scale - with photos...

My 2 current Training level eventers (one is an ex-* horse and one is an ex-** horse) both cross-over into both the Hunters and the Jumpers.

This is huey (21yo OTTB ex-** horse) eventing
Dressage
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=MHT3.jpg
Stadium
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=RJC09-0026706.jpg
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=hueyjump.jpg
XC
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=MHT8.jpg
and here he is in the jumper ring
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=OTTB11.jpg
and in a hunter class
http://brantgamma.exposuremanager.com/p/philadelphia_park_pleasure_hunter_tc/hc_92697_13_47

This is Surf (15yo OTTB ex-* horse) eventing
XC
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=fairhillbank.jpg
SJ
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=MDCTAsj1.jpg
and here he is in a 3' hunter division
http://brantgamma.exposuremanager.com/p/surf_guitar_tc/hc_51090_13_68
http://brantgamma.exposuremanager.com/p/surf_guitar_tc/hc_51094_13_68
My new event horse - an ex-*** horse - has been doing 3'6"/3'9" jumpers with my trainer this winter and has been quite successful. He's built for jumpers though - short coupled, turns on a dime, and jumps the moon :)
http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v692/tarheelmd07/?action=view&current=flying.jpg

Ray
Dec. 31, 2009, 11:52 PM
. Personally I think the eventing world is a great place to look for h/j prospects as if they've done some eventing IME they are generally brave, well broke on the flat, and not ridiculously overpriced.

I agree :yes:

My SO bought an event horse that was trained by/with a BNT and was successful thru Int but developed a "thing" about jumping into water. very nice TB, broke superbly on the flat, super athletic jumper. Is showing in C/A jumpers, has won in Eq and hunters as well. He seems to love his new job :D

just realize that transitioning to a new career can be interesting, to say the least. there are event horses that love the galloping in XC so much, if they even think it could happen, they get excited. like doing jumpers on a grass field can really wake our guy up in a hurry :D

wilbur77
Jan. 1, 2010, 10:42 AM
Kassandra, Treaty, Ballyhack(I think) were all successful!

LeeB10
Jan. 1, 2010, 12:22 PM
My daughters former horse Graf Argentan came from an eventing barn. She showed him as a low level jumper for a year (modified childrens) and then moved him to hunters and equitation the following year. He transitioned beautifully and really liked doing hunters and continues to do them with his new owner. I have videos of him on my Youtube doing all three - eq, hunters, and jumpers. The only problem we had at first was that he didn't know a lot of basic things like auto lead changes, halts, counter canters, had not done gymnastics before either. The good thing was that he did have a dressage background, had a great big stride, was handsome, and could jump (easily about 4'3" to 4'6"). Sweet ground manners were a big plus as well.

RyuEquestrian
Jan. 1, 2010, 01:42 PM
My old equitation horse was an eventer before I purchased him. He went onto take me to all of the East Coast big equitation finals including the USET. He was completely unflappable and taught me a thing or two on the flat as he came with superb 4th level flatwork. I also loved him because when we were inbetween competitions, he was a great trail horse!

I've been tempted to take some of my jumpers onto the cross country course to have a play, but I've been warned against doing too much with them as it tends to flatten out their jump. Or so I've been warned.

Beau Cheval
Jan. 1, 2010, 04:04 PM
I've been tempted to take some of my jumpers onto the cross country course to have a play, but I've been warned against doing too much with them as it tends to flatten out their jump. Or so I've been warned.

I noticed that when watching videos of eventers. Does anyone know why this is? That was one of the reasons I posted this thread.

Timex
Jan. 1, 2010, 06:33 PM
That flatness can come from factors such as the speed the horse is traveling at, the type of jumps they're headed to, the topography (hilly vs flat), or just plain ol'way the horse jumps. Remember, eventers look for a good, clean safe jump. Jumping xc or stadium, they're timed events, you don't necessarily want a lot of air time with a lovely bascule when you have a time limit to deal with. IME, you have a better shot turning an eventer into a jumper or eq horse, but, especially at the lower levels there is no reason why an eventer couldn't be reasonably successful as a hunter as well. I wouldn't bother looking at just event horses to take with you, if you find a nice prospect (h/j/eq or eventer) that you like, take that horse. They can all benefit from the varied work.

yellowbritches
Jan. 1, 2010, 07:03 PM
Lion King is a great example; he started off eventing but became a wonderful hunter. I believe his owner's COTH username is Mestel.

One that became a good equitation horse, and I believe went to medal finals, was Beall na Blath (whose name I'm sure I butchered.) Yellowbritches could tell you more about him.

My horse Tipperary (http://i562.photobucket.com/albums/ss65/2tipperary/Tipperary/Brushlarge-1.jpg) went up to Prelim. I did the big eqs on him and now we play around in the adult eq and jumpers. I won't say he's fancy, but he is a really good egg and a good all-around horse. He can cross over to the hunters and get good ribbons locally, so long as we don't flat ;) but gets bored doing that and really prefers the jumpers and eq. He's pretty laid-back so you wouldn't think he had the get up and go to be a successful eventer... until you take him cross-country! My Children's hunter, Renaissance (http://i562.photobucket.com/albums/ss65/2tipperary/Renaissance/wihs1.jpg), also started out as an eventer, but he went BN and N only before the rider quit in favor of playing soccer. His trainer at that time sold him as a hunter and 3' eq horse after he won a local medal final, and he was a very good Children's hunter type. Bonus to the event-trained horses: their flatwork is usually to die for!
Ha! I was on my way to mention both Tipperary and Beal Na Blath. Tip actually did the kids jumpers in Ireland before we imported him. He competed through preliminary but an incident with a rouge JRT in his last training level before his prelim move up made him a bit of a nervous wreck on xc. He did some child/AA jumpers for awhile (some of which was with another COTHER, xctrygirl and included a trip to local finals at WIHS) and actually came back to eventing briefly before Renn bought him. He is a VERY cool horse and it was no surprise to me that he did so well for her in the Big Eq. :D

Rumple (Beal Na Blath) was 10th in the 4 year old Young Event Horse finals in the UK before he was imported for my boss to hopefully make a bid with for the team. He competed very, very successfully through the one star level (long format) but his size proved to be too much for the galloping.

After a try at the big jumpers (which he could have done, too), he moved on to the Eq ring with the help of Deloise Noble-Strong and within his first season (which he didn't even start until June I think) helped a couple of kids qualify for finals, I believe (if I remember correctly), was leased at one of the indoors for an adult to do finals on (which I think they won), and went to at least two, if not three of the big finals with that year. He LOVED the job (he is the kind of horse that loved, loved, loved the attention from the teenage girls ;)). He is a very cool horse who was destined to be great no matter where he went. Only thing that ever bugged me about his career switch was when a particular popular and sucessful Eq coach said he was a great horse but had an "ugly" head!!! Rumple is one of the most handsome horses I've ever met, I just don't think this particular person appreciates the rugged good looks of an Irish horse when all they ever see are those Zoolander handsome WBs! ;)

The thing that makes event horses good Eq horses (especially the ones that have done prelim or more) is that they have excellent flatwork! They are also basically fearless when it comes to things in the ring (some of the bogie fences I've seen at the various finals the last couple of years Rumple and Tip both would not have batted an eye at).

We also have a VERY BN jumper rider connection that is ALWAYS telling us to send him our event horse rejects because even our cowards are more than brave enough in the show jumping ring :lol:

I do think that you can't necessarily write them off as lost causes for the hunters, either. It can be hard to see because they are ridden differently as eventers (both over fences and on the flat), but I know quite a few eventers that if ridden like a hunter will look like a hunter. Even my little TB looks like a little hunter when allowed to go like it! :lol:

Renn/aissance
Jan. 1, 2010, 07:21 PM
They are also basically fearless when it comes to things in the ring (some of the bogie fences I've seen at the various finals the last couple of years Rumple and Tip both would not have batted an eye at).

Absolutely seconded. The only time it occurs to Tip to put on the brakes at a fence is when I get him into somewhere Jesus couldn't jump from, and uh, that doesn't happen often. :lol: His eventing confidence has given him the understanding that things which are in his way are to be jumped regardless of what they look like, and he is very happy to oblige. That hideous fence at medal finals covered in what is it, orange plastic ferns? He thinks it would look just fine from his rear-view mirror as he cantered down to the next jump. I've jumped him over a single flowerpot with a fern in, about 3' high with no wings, and he didn't think about blinking. Part of that is his natural attitude--he LOVES to jump--but part of it is his eventing training.

(Sing Mia Song, I'm honored that you thought of Tip when you thought of eventers-turned-H/J/Eq horses!)

gottagrey
Jan. 1, 2010, 11:39 PM
One of the earlier posters mentioned a good horse is a good horse - so true. Good solid foundation training is a must which I think helps a horse in ANY discipline. I have a friend who had a problem w/ her horse - she had a friend who was a top notch reining rider/coach/trainer. She sent her horse to "cowboy camp" for a couple of months. She never had any problems w/ her since that time - they laid a good foundation. I watched a couple of lessons there -and while they were western &reining lessons you could see the basics of dressage there - while they didn't teach "dressage" there were similarities. Bottom line is a good horse is a good horse. I also think switching disciplines from time to time helps keep the horses fresh and interested. We would take our show hunters to local unrated events for a change and sometimes even team penning (okay let's talk about chasing cows in an English saddle - oh the looks)

And I've seen event riders certainly enter the jumper ring and kick butt; do equitation. One of the gals at my barn has a lovely lovely horse which she got to be her move up Intermediate/Advanced horse - the horse just does not have the get and go for that level - she is now a lovely hunter. I think at her first rated hunter show she came home champion.

Elouise
Jan. 2, 2010, 11:56 AM
My two best horses came from eventing backgounds.

My jumper evented to Prelim. and that horse would jump anything from anywhere. Gutsy, fast, surefooted and would turn so quick he would spin you off. Loved the jumper game. Was mentally fried when I got him about doing lead changes so I never asked.

My other was bred to be an event horse and while she would jump anything, she wanted to look at it so she would slow down and look at it over the top of the jump. So slow and round in the air. Nearly got jumped off multiple times in hunterland. But galloped around the natural obstacles at Middleburg and Upperville while other horses were slamming on the brakes. The more solid the jump, the higher she went.

I will always consider looking an an event horse for sale when shopping for a new horse.

hideyourheart03
Jan. 2, 2010, 01:58 PM
I rode a horse for a little while that was an event horse, but was worth more as a Low Junior Jumper type. The owner's only fear was that if he ever had to jump the open water, he would go through it instead of over it! :lol: (Not a problem with the horse shows around here...) He as a blast though!

17hTBmare
Jan. 2, 2010, 03:05 PM
I am blessed with a DWB who started out as an eventer. I bought him and leased him to a junior as a jumper. She aged out, and now the horse is the best hunt horse I have ever had.

Sing Mia Song
Jan. 2, 2010, 05:58 PM
You mean Cecil wasn't the first one that leapt to mind for you?! I know, it was a long time ago :)

:lol::lol::lol:

Vandy, longer ago than I care to admit! But I think the big reason I didn't immediately think about him is (no, not Alzheimer's) because I didn't know until you told me a couple years ago!

Do you remember Rachel Miller's eq horse Raison D'Etre? He was another one who evented to prelim. She bought him from Stephi Baer. Unfortunately he didn't meet his full potential as an eq horse, as he colicked the year after she sold him and had to be put down.

Vandy
Jan. 3, 2010, 11:21 AM
Of course I remember Raisin, always thought he was such a lovely horse. I didn't know about his colic, all these years later it's still sad. He was so elegant and special.