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peppermintpatty
Dec. 29, 2009, 10:06 AM
nevermind, i'll get a book :) and just try some out. thanks for your help.

Blackberry Farm
Dec. 29, 2009, 10:31 AM
I'm a fan of snaffles unless they don't work for some reason. Maybe you should try that first. :)-BTW A waterford isn't a leverage bit. It's not really harsh either, but not necessary for most horses. If you've got a hunter, a traditional bit is what you should use.;)

peppermintpatty
Dec. 29, 2009, 10:34 AM
He's a jumper, but I know they've tried a snaffle in the past that he ran right through... I think it was just a full cheek though, so maybe a slow twist? I'm not very educated when it comes to bits... :confused:

I talked to people at Beval's and the waterfords are what they suggested, but maybe not..

kookicat
Dec. 29, 2009, 10:34 AM
I'd think about trying him in a pelham or some kind of gag bit.

Blackberry Farm
Dec. 29, 2009, 10:43 AM
First, I would get some good literature on bits. There is a lot to know and understand, and a lot of people don't know much about the mouth because what they have works. :) If you've got a tricky situation, I would do research using expert sources first. I would also use the trainer, former owner, and vet.There's way too much unknown here to really help in any other way. Mylar (sp?) has a good book on the mouth to get started.

Blackberry Farm
Dec. 29, 2009, 12:22 PM
I think you'll be very happy to learn more about the mouth and bits from books. The Mylar is great, and easy. I would ask, if you haven't already, why the horse was put in a hack and also what they've tried. Full cheeks could be single or double jointed, thick or thin, comfort type mouth (curves to shape of mouth). It could've been a slow twist or harsher.There's really a lot to know about bits. The outside doesn't tell so much about the inside most of the time. Most eggbut cheekpieces, however, seem to be simple hollow or heavy single jointed, or Dr. Bristol, or French link- not twisted. Just an observation- I could be wrong. Many horses just go in a plain old snaffle fine, but some are more difficult-prior training and/or lack of, teeth, shape of mouth, rider technique...I own one now like that, and it's frustrating. I've ridden a couple in the past with bitting issues too. Luckily for me the owner did all the bit trying. I didn't mean to sound abrupt-if I did. You can PM me as you go through this trial and error. I'm no expert, but I can tell you about my experience and good sources for reading.

peppermintpatty
Dec. 29, 2009, 04:40 PM
thanks for your help.. you didn't seem abrupt, i just reread the post and realized the problems i'm having probably can't be described correctly for anyone to make a very good suggestion. I will definitely talk to my trainer when I get back (i'm home from college on break now) and ask some more questions. I'm just doing the bit shopping while I'm home and didn't want to get back to TN with all the wrong stuff. hehe

Blackberry Farm
Dec. 29, 2009, 05:09 PM
Enjoy your break! ;)