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View Full Version : Any suggestions on how to advertise for this?



eponacowgirl
Dec. 29, 2009, 02:47 AM
My BO and I have gotten in the habit of buying unloved backyard ponies and flipping them for a profit... (Okay, just kidding. We don't flip them because we LOVE THEM TOO MUCH and we CERTAINLY don't profit when they will...eventually... find their new owners!).

Anyway, we have three right now- what usually happens is we go looking for a horse FOR someone specifically and then find something that we go "even if ... doesn't like it, we should be able to find someone that will love this horse!" and we bring it home and hope that there is a match. Strike three- you'd think we'd learn.

At this point, anyway, we have two of the three half leased to folks who aren't quite committed to buy. This is covering the horses expenses, so that is great, but since they stay in full training as they're being leased (as they are still sale horses) their price goes up and we will end up pricing these folks out of the horse- so it is unlikely that the lease will develop into a purchase. Which sucks.

At any rate, our biggest problem with selling these three is that we really would like them to stay at the farm. We are not requiring it and certainly not advertising as such, but we have a great barn environment that caters to EVERYTHING. Excellent care and facilities, good trainer for the lower levels and people are welcome to bring their own if ours doesn't fit. The cost is very reasonable for anyone looking to buy in the range these horses are priced at. Most people who come to visit fall in love and stay. We have never lost a boarder that hasn't moved out of town or lost their horse for whatever reason.

So- how do we go searching for the folks looking for a horse AND a place to keep it? All three horses were chosen as exceptional adult ammy mounts who will be very competitive at the lower levels, and that is the type of boarder we are looking to bring in.

teddygirl
Dec. 29, 2009, 03:11 AM
I've done something similar with my BO, flipping horses. In theory this makes a profit. I know the BO would love the horses to stay at the barn, and she has sold a few to boarders, but it's really hard to get people to buy a horse and move into your barn. After all, selling is hard enough, and most people looking for a horse have a trainer and barn already. I think your best bet is to approach the people who are leasing the horses and offer them a deal to buy the horse and keep it there. You could even offer them a lease-to-buy situation (the horse will be worth x amount in 6 months, but if you start making payments now we'll sell him to you for a discount). That said, there's no way to assure that once the horse is sold it will stay at the farm indefinitely. People's situations change. But you have a much better chance with the people who are there now, there's no way I know of to sell a horse to someone and insist they board with you. But if the barn is nice enough they may decide to move in anyway! You could advertise a lease-to-buy option at your barn, but that may be restrictive. It depends how much you want to sell

Hilary
Dec. 29, 2009, 09:50 AM
I would just advertise the horses and when people come to look tell them that you would have space for them to board if they are interested. It might come across as a little controlling if you push too hard - here's a horse for sale and by the way this is The Best Barn Ever and after you pay me for the horse you should keep paying me board. Or, says to the prospective buyer "you're not good enough to find a decent place for Poopsie to live". I'd be turned off by that implication, but not by being told that there would be an extra stall if I wanted to join the barn with my new horse.


If you sell the horse but he stays in the barn does this prevent you from getting another project? This might actually be OK, right? Empty stalls have a way of filling themselves up so if a project stays on, you won't be tempted to pick up another?

As the other person said, if your barn is really nice, people will want to be there, you won't have to put strings on the horse they buy.

eponacowgirl
Dec. 29, 2009, 10:57 AM
At any rate, our biggest problem with selling these three is that we really would like them to stay at the farm. We are not requiring it and certainly not advertising as such...

I DEFINITELY understand that we'll run people off if we say anything "but we want her to stay heeereeeeeeeee!" which is why we HAVEN'T been doing that.

On our fliers, we simply put "Priced at $xxxx with terms available to the right home." When people ask, we just tell them that they can lease to buy or lease at our farm, which I think is reasonable.


If you sell the horse but he stays in the barn does this prevent you from getting another project? This might actually be OK, right? Empty stalls have a way of filling themselves up so if a project stays on, you won't be tempted to pick up another?
This isn't much of an issue for us- we'll end up with more horses either way! :lol::lol:


As the other person said, if your barn is really nice, people will want to be there, you won't have to put strings on the horse they buy.

We're advertising in all the normal ways in a normal manner, too- we don't EXPECT them to stick around- but I'm just wondering if anyone has any bright ideas how to hit that "other" group of folks who may be looking for just the right boarding situation as well.


You could even offer them a lease-to-buy situation (the horse will be worth x amount in 6 months, but if you start making payments now we'll sell him to you for a discount).
Thats not a bad idea- won't work for my current leasers, as they're just riding for the fun of riding and will be able to pick up a horse that meets their needs STILL a lot cheaper, but may work for other people who are looking!




That said, there's no way to assure that once the horse is sold it will stay at the farm indefinitely. People's situations change.
Totally understood, trust me.

subk
Dec. 29, 2009, 05:06 PM
It's almost as if you need to bring in new clients/riders who don't have horses, teach them on these horses (if appropriate) then get these new riders to buy the horses and stay. So how do you find new riders...

One thing you might try is to donate a lesson package to a charity auction. All the private schools in the area have fundraising auctions that this type of thing would be great for. If you want to focus on adults instead of school aged kids there are plenty of local charity auctions that would work for that too. Feel free to pick my brain on specifics offline.

judybigredpony
Dec. 30, 2009, 08:52 AM
Offer the horses w/ boarding as a package deal for 1 year....you can do it either w/ price of board included in price of horse or seperately.

And advertise it such catering to someone who wants to get into the eventing world as a ammy maybe 1st timer. Made horse and 1 yr old board in safe enviorment where lessons and shows will be hand walked thru the process....and a out clause that if after 6 months they want to board somewhere else or aren't happy they can leave w/ 6 months refunded...you will have to escrow that monies in a say 6 month CD so you earn something.
But you still sold the horse and no take backs, be real, there are more waiting for you out there...........

hldyrhrses
Dec. 30, 2009, 11:09 AM
I helped sell two horses for a woman this summer. The horses were both leased out but the people were not interested in buying when they had a great deal leasing... anyway, once the horses got advertised and flyers started showing up at shows and people started calling... both leasers bought the horses! sometimes people just need a little push!