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JumpinBean17
Dec. 28, 2009, 08:46 PM
My question is, is it ever to late to become a very competitive rider? I have been riding for a while now, but never had a serious trainer. Ridden tons of different horses, done local shows, do alright for myself, but again feel like I've missed a lot of stuff along the way. Experienced without the proper education I guess you might say, although I feel like I know most theory well enough to apply it to someone else I just cant always execute! I feel like I have been stuck at 2'6 forever, im in my early 20's and now would like to seriously get my butt into gear. Is it too late? I know that I have more baggage (as in bad habits) then someone who is just starting, but have I totally missed the boat by not having an illustrious childhood in the SS circuit. Has anyone else started later on and and now find themselves competitive at the bigger shows? (I know it'll take, $$, work and a good trainer) just would like to hear how realistic it is!
Thanks!

M. O'Connor
Dec. 28, 2009, 09:12 PM
No, it is not too late.

SOTB
Dec. 28, 2009, 09:13 PM
I've seen a couple of very good riders who started later in life - in fact I have a very good friend who did just that. She, however, had the money and time to really dedicate herself to it. She got a top trainer, a very nice horse, rides at least 4 days a week and lessons 2-3 times a week. She is a beautiful and effective rider. It can be done with the right person, right trainer, right horse and $$. Good luck!

kellidahorsegirl
Dec. 28, 2009, 09:48 PM
It is absolutely never too late to dedicate yourself to being good and competitive at ANYTHING.

If you want this, you will make it happen :D

AllyandPete
Dec. 28, 2009, 10:36 PM
Its never too late! but I feel your pain...I have felt stuck for years!

It is so frustrating but how can you expect to get better if you do not have the time and money to devote to it? I am FINALLY done with school and have the time again, but I sure don't have the money, so I am back to looking at OTTBs with potential like I used to have 5+ years ago (that I had to sell after I got him started over 3 jump crossrail "courses"). OHHHH maybe I will see 3' again by the time I am 35....

PineHillFarm
Dec. 28, 2009, 10:48 PM
I feel your pain! I am 35 & currently semi-retired raising a family. I was a pro for 15 yrs., but never had the $$ to get anywhere. I still want to ride & train. At the moment, I am 30+lbs. over weight, totally out of shape & haven't ridden in months. I got a bug up my butt that I want to work for Leslie Howard. That has been my dream for many years. It sounds crazy, but I am looking into it. I would have to move my family, ect. But it is something I really want. I may even need to wait a few years to do it. Maybe my hubby won't let me. But I won't let age stop me!

Remember, age is just a number.

Thirties are the new Twenties ;)

jackandlily
Dec. 28, 2009, 10:52 PM
I know exactly how you feel... early 20's, and for the majority of college I took a break from riding (and any riding I did get to do was rarely in the form of a lesson, mostly just light hacks). I feel rushed almost, now, wanting to learn everything I missed out on once college and limited access to trainers happened.

There is time, though. Like someone else said, if you want it bad enough and have the passion, you WILL make it happen.

JumpinBean17
Dec. 28, 2009, 10:56 PM
thanks, this is more encouraging, I am starting to feel like I am destined to ride 2'6 my entire life. I would love to ride/train/work for a pro, but I feel like I would need to train to train with one haha. As much as I love my own horses Im thinking its time to schedule myself some lessons on some packers. Never had a chance to ride a totally made horse, I was always on the crazies/not super talented, which def have some good lessons of their own to teach but it never really got me anywhere!
Keep the tips/stories/encouragement coming folks!

kellidahorsegirl
Dec. 28, 2009, 11:12 PM
Maybe it would be helpful to list where you're located (or a general area).

I know for me, if you happen to live in Nebraska, I'd be happy to let you ride my packer mare (she does 3'6 jumpers)...or ride something else and just mess around to get back into riding shape. Someone else MAY be willing to do the same :)

Hampton Bay
Dec. 28, 2009, 11:49 PM
Not hunter/jumper, but Nichole Uphoff was 40 when she started riding dressage. She made it to the top of the sport just fine.

meupatdoes
Dec. 29, 2009, 06:58 AM
It is not too late.

Firstly, there is nothing wrong with riding 2'6". I think that people who can build a 2'6" course into a horse and have done it on horse after horse are often more educated riders than people who are doing 3'6"+ on trainer-managed and trainer-developed horses.
If you really ride 2'6"/3' right, and you know exactly where that ride comes from through every inch of the horse and what systematic training system creates it, when the time comes you will be able to just step up a foot with no problems.

Paradoxically if you really want to get good I would spend at least a year with a dressage trainer. Really get some depth in your knowledge on flatwork; learn how to set up a systematic ride with exercises custom tailored to the horse you are on at the moment. If you are at a stage where you are frustrated and want to move up you will get more "bang for your buck" both money, time, and education wise with a dressage trainer at this point in your riding education, I think.

Then when you can really put a flat ride on a horse and you know where stuff comes from in a ride all the way back to Intro level, or when you know where you are going six months down the line and why are you doing this exercise now, you will not recognize yourself how you ride.

Also, learn how barns are run from morning feed to night check. Get a depth to your knowledge here as if one day there might be an apocalypse and you might walk in the barn down the road with nothing but the feed chart and the names on the stall doors to help you. Could you step up and run the place? Can you handle stallions? Broodmares? Can you do turnouts and blankets even on difficult horses that are young or have behavior issues? It is one thing to lead old Dobbin down the lane, another when it is a 3yo stallion. Do you know how to load a problem loader matter of factly and efficiently without resorting to violence? Can you install brakes at the mounting block on one that likes to take off? Can you teach manners in the grooming stall? Can you look at feet and know in how many weeks the farrier should show up? Can you give shots? IV? IM? Basic medical attention if someone gets scratches on a back leg or a cut near his eye- and even on a horse that might not stand so nice and well-behaved for you?
Can you manage the barn help, remember when to get feed, and keep track of the worming cycle? Drive a trailer? Pack a trailer for a show and set up when you get there?

If you keep scouting always for a trainer who will put you on stuff, and then you show up with some "depth" to your basics, you will be surprised how willing they are to put you on some stuff.

Don't do this scouting over the phone, show up in person ready to demonstrate your mettle in a lesson, not just declare it.

Right now I am riding with someone where the first phone conversation was very standard, you know, "Board is $x per horse, etc etc," Well, I showed up and he liked how I rode and how I was around the horses and within two days I could ride literally anything in the barn I wanted. He asked me, "So do you like to ride the big jumps?" I said, "I wouldn't know I have never really had the opportunity." He said, "That surprises me from the way you flat," (see? I wasn't kidding about how much a dressage background can be the ticket) and that afternoon the rails went near the top of the standards.
Two weeks after I showed up he had to go to Europe and he turned the barn over to me in his absence (there's were the horse management part comes in). I was responsible for 20 horses; when the barn help had off I did the mucking, made the call on blankets, did all of the turnouts, and rode. It was me at the farm and no one else. When the barn help was there I had help with the stalls but still needed to manage.
The ability to step in and do that at a barn I was just getting to know really helped out in the "getting-thrown-some-rides" department.

I turn 30 in two weeks and finally I am at a place where I can jump the big jumps and ride the upper level dressage horses.

It is not too late.

Do everything in your power to have a lot of "depth" to your riding and horse management. Volunteer at rescues to help retrain those guys. Take a million dressage lessons. See if you can learn something about long lining. Maybe skulk around the event world a little too. Volunteer to ride the greenest horse in the barn in a lesson below your level but at the horse's level, so that you can gain experience installing a ride. Strive to know always where everything comes from in the ride you are putting on a horse, and what the next step will be and the one after that.
Learn how to manage a barn from sunup to sundown. Follow a vet around for a month if you can. Ask the farrier to teach you how to pull a shoe next time he's around. Maybe follow him around for a month if he'll let you. Follow a saddle fitter around to some barn calls; go in the shop and learn how a saddle is made from the ground up and learn how they are repaired. Audit some natural horsemanship clinics so if something won't get on a truck, you have some tools in your back pocket. If there is a natural horsemanship guy in your area, knock on his door and ask if you can take some lessons from him. Etc, etc, etc.

You will ride better and manage horses better than a lot of the bigger-jumping, trainer-coddled riders if you do this.

Then when opportunity knocks, you can just open the door and walk on through.

JumpinBean17
Dec. 29, 2009, 08:52 AM
Thanks kellidahorsegirl, I wish MA was close to Nebraska haha I would be over to your place in a heartbeat!

Thanks so much meupatdoes See on the ground I am the most confident horseperson you could find. I've been manager at two different facilities, I have foaled out a handful of precious little ones, I have been responsible for breeding, both handling the stallions and the mares, I have backed a baby for the first time, worked with an off the track race horse, I teach beginner lessons, I also have worked with yearlings on up, both on the ground and on their backs, I’ve worked with numerous different breeds of horses. I was also an equine vet tech for a couple years. You could face me with anything on the ground! But I just feel like I have only kind of skimmed the surface with my riding, I have skipped a lot of steps along the way and moved up when I don’t think I really should have because I definitely missed some things. I could definitely benefit from some more dressage (jumping is just flatwork with obstacles as they say!)
There are definitely holes in my training that I absolutely need to go back and fill in before I could even consider moving up, going backwards at this point just worries me because I feel like at this rate with how much I have done in the horse world I should be a fantastic rider! I could jump around a course and somehow get my striding but where I grew up riding I was never shown how to bend at the hip… or count my strides, or how to execute a flying lead change (not that we had any horses that could do that either! Haha) so sure I can bop around a course and do alright for myself but its certainly not as accurate as it should be, and when I get into a tight spot I get all fumbled and left behind or jump ahead.
It definitely helps to hear all these tips! And others who feel the same way, or of people who have beem successful later on!

Ozone
Dec. 29, 2009, 08:56 AM
Metopdoes, WELL SAID :)

Nikki^
Dec. 29, 2009, 09:13 AM
Not hunter/jumper, but Nichole Uphoff was 40 when she started riding dressage. She made it to the top of the sport just fine.

She was way younger when she started.
http://www.eurodressage.com/news/focus/foc_uphoff.html

caradino
Dec. 29, 2009, 11:17 AM
My question is, is it ever to late to become a very competitive rider? I have been riding for a while now, but never had a serious trainer. Ridden tons of different horses, done local shows, do alright for myself, but again feel like I've missed a lot of stuff along the way. Experienced without the proper education I guess you might say, although I feel like I know most theory well enough to apply it to someone else I just cant always execute! I feel like I have been stuck at 2'6 forever, im in my early 20's and now would like to seriously get my butt into gear. Is it too late? I know that I have more baggage (as in bad habits) then someone who is just starting, but have I totally missed the boat by not having an illustrious childhood in the SS circuit. Has anyone else started later on and and now find themselves competitive at the bigger shows? (I know it'll take, $$, work and a good trainer) just would like to hear how realistic it is!
Thanks!

are you my twin?!

i feel like i'm going to be at 2'6" for the rest of my life, also in my early 20's, ridden since i was 10, and just never had the money, opportunity, or horses nice enough to go farther. my senior year at college was the high point in my riding, was showing 1st level dressage, playing with 2nd, and schooling 3' on a semi-regular basis. then i graduated, had to go work, and now all i can afford time/money wise is a 1x week group lesson, which i am grateful for, but i admit i often get jealous of friends who get to ride more often and nicer horses. hopefully next year i will move UP (haha, up..) to the level 0 jumpers, but who knows. when i can finally buy something it will probably be an OTTB, because that's where my budget is right now, so i'll have to spend more years working that horse up past the 2'6" mark. sigh. i feel your pain! my ultimate goal in life is now to show.. SOMEDAY.. in the 3' hunters. and not embarass myself.

Riley0522
Dec. 29, 2009, 02:04 PM
JumpinBean...totally feel your pain, I am practically at the same stage as you, and feel so stuck...hoping to really start working towards my riding goals come spring. I'm in my early 20s, fresh out of college, starting a new career, was out of horses for 3 1/2 years of college, and am now just getting my older (16) TB back into working form after a sesamoid fracture and ulcers. He's basically going to have the winter off and then we'll start fresh with lots of flatting in the spring...or so that's my plan.

I, too, would love to take some jumping lessons on a packer as I want to do jumpers and my horse needs lots more flatwork before we get there...even then he'll be limited to 3' due to age and the old leg injury, so I'll be looking at leasing/buying something new if/when I'm ready to show again.

It's comforting to hear other people in the same dilemma riding wise....hope to hear you're back on track in a few months!

imapepper
Dec. 29, 2009, 03:46 PM
It's not too late :) But you need to have family support, be willing to work hard and a little $$$ with a touch of luck never hurts ;)

I am you.....but a tad older ;) I just turned 40 :eek: I started working in the horse business when I was 17 to earn my rides. I have ridden on the track, started babies on the farm, foal watched, assisted with breeding (not my fav), run a lesson program, ridden a ton of retreads and started lots horses over fences. I have had tons of experience but very little formal education and I have not had much opportunity to show. I decided in my late 20s to try to pursue my dreams as an ammy and have been stuck in the same place due to lack of $$$ and lack of family support. And I still don't think it's too late for me ;) You need one or the other....both are nice ;)

You CAN do it though. Get to clinics as often as possible. Find a great trainer that is comfortable working with more advanced riders. Spend a little taking some lessons and if they have something for you to ride....jump on it :) Good luck!!!

CosMonster
Dec. 29, 2009, 04:34 PM
I've known several very good, competitive riders and even a couple of pros who did not start riding at all until their 20s, so you're ahead of the game there. ;)

No really, everyone else has given very good advice so I just thought I'd chime in and say don't give up, it's definitely not too late.

ridingschmedly
Dec. 29, 2009, 04:42 PM
It's never too late! I often see an older woman at locals shows winning divisions on her OTTB! She is at least 55-65, and a very good rider. I look up to her a great bit. :)

Dun Ciarain
Dec. 29, 2009, 04:59 PM
I had started back riding after a 20 year break and was jumping about 2'3". I went to Ireland and rode in several lessons a day for 10 days straight on good horses and was jumping 3'6" the last few days. If you have the proper base training, then it is easy to move up with the right training and the right horses. Of course, it made a big difference that one of the horses I rode was a competition horse that was a seasoned pro at 3'6", rather than a typical lesson horse that jumps 2' - 2'6".

The proper fundamentals are very important to be able to move up.

AllyandPete
Dec. 30, 2009, 12:40 AM
are you my twin?!

i feel like i'm going to be at 2'6" for the rest of my life, also in my early 20's, ridden since i was 10, and just never had the money, opportunity, or horses nice enough to go farther. my senior year at college was the high point in my riding, was showing 1st level dressage, playing with 2nd, and schooling 3' on a semi-regular basis. then i graduated, had to go work, and now all i can afford time/money wise is a 1x week group lesson, which i am grateful for, but i admit i often get jealous of friends who get to ride more often and nicer horses. hopefully next year i will move UP (haha, up..) to the level 0 jumpers, but who knows. when i can finally buy something it will probably be an OTTB, because that's where my budget is right now, so i'll have to spend more years working that horse up past the 2'6" mark. sigh. i feel your pain! my ultimate goal in life is now to show.. SOMEDAY.. in the 3' hunters. and not embarass myself.


Actually we must be triplets...except I'm in my late 20s haha

WorthTheWait95
Dec. 30, 2009, 09:13 AM
It's never too late. My BO has a string of really nice horses and competes in the medium or high AO Jumpers. She rode as a kid and did pony finals, etc then her parents took horses away as a 'punishment' in high school (big mistake!), she went kind of wild. She pulled it together and went to college and then bought a farm when she graduated and started riding again. She's a little different since she's well off from family money but still.

caseyann
Dec. 30, 2009, 09:50 AM
It's pretty coincidental that I came across this post... I just asked my trainer the other day whether I should even try showing or 'leave it for the kids'. I'm 37 yrs old and started back riding last Feb when my 2nd child turned 6 months and I needed to get out of the house. As a kid I spent a lot of time at the barn, did one schooling show, and was just at the point of getting over the crosspoles when I was told that my parents couldn't afford the lessons anymore (both an issue of money and time, since I was one of 5 and the closest barn was 20 miles away). With that in mind, my goal was to find a job where I was able to make enough money to afford a horse and the time to actually go ride it. I focused on my education, graduated from medical school, did a 5 year residency, had the kids, and FINALLY decided it was time to get back into riding.

At my age, I am certain that I will never make it to the A circuit, but have my sights set on some beginner or C-circuit classes this summer. I bought an older hunter that has been educating me quite well but is limited to 2'6" anyway.

"Good" is very much a perspective, and it all depends on where you set your goals. I'll consider myself 'good' if I can go to a show and not completely embarrass myself. :winkgrin:

caradino
Dec. 30, 2009, 10:06 AM
Actually we must be triplets...except I'm in my late 20s haha

can we start a club?

or a syndicate and buy ourselves a nice horse?

JumpinBean17
Dec. 30, 2009, 10:09 AM
haha caradino im all for that

caradino
Dec. 30, 2009, 10:33 AM
haha caradino im all for that

excellent!

where do you live and what kind of horses do you like? :p

RAyers
Dec. 30, 2009, 11:22 AM
I didn't start competing at the FEI/international levels until I was in my 40s.

Reed

Hampton Bay
Dec. 30, 2009, 12:52 PM
She was way younger when she started.
http://www.eurodressage.com/news/focus/foc_uphoff.html

I wonder where in the world I read that she was 40? Maybe I am thinking of someone else.

JBCool
Dec. 30, 2009, 02:33 PM
Caradino--I think you're MY twin. I showed 3' my last two years of college and could do 2'6" really well on almost anything. Then, of course, life got in the way: I have to fit riding around my job and can only afford one lesson a week (weather permitting).

I'm currently showing 2'6" again and sometimes get really frustrated because I still tend to hold myself to those old standards that I and my (borrowed lesson) horse can't do right now. I hate seeing my college coach at the shows when I know I didn't ride nearly as well as she taught me to. Not to mention having to ride against her new team...

AllyandPete
Dec. 31, 2009, 12:13 AM
can we start a club?

or a syndicate and buy ourselves a nice horse?


the "people in their 20's that want to be good" club!

and you can sign me up for a nice mare with a floaty trot! ;)

JumpinBean17
Dec. 31, 2009, 10:18 AM
Well since we're putting in requests... I'd love a warmblood gelding (a little calmer than my TB mares please haha) that can pack my bum around a course!

dorytuo
Dec. 31, 2009, 11:53 AM
can we start a club?

or a syndicate and buy ourselves a nice horse?

I'm in! I'm 29 and started riding 2 years ago. Never had intentions of showing, but now it's different. I've seen the crazy high jumps and it amazes me. I'm not looking to do 4' or anything, but I'd love to show and do 3'. I'm going to HITS ocala in February so that's a start. It's just so expensive and I dont know how long I can keep it up. I love the challenge and I dont think I'd be happy with just hacking and trail riding only in the future.

I grew up where hunter/jumper riding is pretty much unheard of. We just did the back yard, try to catch granny's horse, hop and and GO! This is a whole new world to me. I'm just sad that I missed out on doing it as a kid and through college.

caradino
Dec. 31, 2009, 12:56 PM
this actually makes me feel a lot better that there are so many of us!!

i would loff a TB or TBX mare or gelding with some personality that knows their job over 3' and up! but none of this WB push-ride nonsense :P

AllyandPete
Dec. 31, 2009, 04:42 PM
this actually makes me feel a lot better that there are so many of us!!

i would loff a TB or TBX mare or gelding with some personality that knows their job over 3' and up! but none of this WB push-ride nonsense :P

I KNEW we were twins! haha:D

JumpinBean17
Dec. 31, 2009, 05:46 PM
your more than welcome to ride my hot tb mare, she is certainly FULL of personality haha! Tons of fun and wouldnt have it any other way...def never boring, but I would still like the opportunity to just get on a push button ho-hum horse just to see what its like!
This makes me feel a LOT better to!

SarahandSam
Dec. 31, 2009, 05:53 PM
I am another one of the in-my-twenties-but-want-to-be-good folks. (: I have a good green pony now, I just want to be able to do as well as he'll be able to! I'm trying to set practical goals... if I can someday do up to 3' then I'll be happy. Don't see anything higher than that in my future, but I would like to at least do some rated shows someday, if only in short stirrup. d;

It makes me sad seeing all the youngsters who are already so much better than me and half my age, but I remind myself--they're still young enough to bounce when they hit the ground.

sweetpea
Jan. 1, 2010, 07:58 AM
Actually as we age which ---- you are young and your riding will have a different meaning than when you were younger.

I am 35+ and I am determined to be a certain point before 40. It is not about winning , it is about quality .

Flash44
Jan. 1, 2010, 09:05 AM
I did not get a good h/j education with a decent trainer until I was in my 30s! I spent a lot of time galloping racehorses prior to that, so my strength was that I was pretty fearless.

The most important thing I learned was patience and perseverance. Steady work in a logical program over time equals good progress.

caradino
Jan. 6, 2010, 09:57 AM
I KNEW we were twins! haha:D

MY LONG LOST SISTER!! hahaha

jumps got bumped up to a whopping 2'6 in my lesson last night because the one girl in our group that should be in a lower level group didn't show up.. WOOHOO! PROGRESS!

meanwhile, my loffly schoolie decided he was a wild GP stallion and blasted around over-jumping everything. teehee. what fun. maybe one day i'll be on his level!

Spud&Saf
Jan. 6, 2010, 10:40 AM
Can I join this clique too?

Can we make it a signature line clique??? :yes:

caradino
Jan. 6, 2010, 10:55 AM
Can I join this clique too?

Can we make it a signature line clique??? :yes:

um, yes. yes i think that's an excellent idea.

what should we call ourselves?!

the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique?

Spud&Saf
Jan. 6, 2010, 11:53 AM
Yes! That's perfect...off to amend signature line now....:cool:

isltime
Jan. 6, 2010, 04:21 PM
are you too old to be a competitive rider. are you kidding me. i started riding when i was 20. didn't own a horse, use to take a lesson a week and rode intercollegiately in the novice rider division. i am now 52, have owned my own horse since i graduated college 31 years ago. i have had several very competitve horses throughout the years, including winning hoty in the a/o hunters in 1999 and two very nice a/o hunters now which i started. i love it and work at it. so i say go for it. you're never too old. certaintly not went your in early 20's.

AppendixQHLover
Jan. 6, 2010, 05:30 PM
It is never to late to be good...

Heck I just started riding hunters a few years ago, and do some dressage. We do LOTS of flat work and some jumps. My guy is a old been there done that horse that knows his job. He is maxed out at 2"6 and when I start jumping over that I will have to get a new horse. Right now he is a angel.

He is a packer but he is not a dud. But at shows he is completely predictable and is the same at home as he is at shows. Shows to him is a big party with lots of hay and pretty ribbons.

jerseypony
Jan. 6, 2010, 10:17 PM
Another member to add to the clique here. I'm in my mid twenties, been riding since I was 8. Always did local and C shows. Never had the money for top trainers or horses but got a lot of riding time. Got a really good education while I was in college. Now I finally have my first horse, a young ottb mare. Love her to death, and am hoping that she turns into something that I can really move up with. But she is only at 2'3" to 2'6" herself right now, so I must be patient. I am also working full time to pay for her, so it's difficult to schedule enough time for lessons, etc. I'm trying! :) Where is everyone from?

AllyandPete
Jan. 6, 2010, 10:32 PM
um, yes. yes i think that's an excellent idea.

what should we call ourselves?!

the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique?

IM IN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

sparky6
Jan. 7, 2010, 09:15 AM
Me! Pick me! I'm 100% in this club-SO glad I'm not alone!

I didn't ride during undergrad (and, while I rode in HS, there were not consistent lessons), took a year off with big plans to bring my horse over and enjoy only working and no school. Sadly the reality of "oh wait, just because you're not in college doesn't mean you're not broke" set in so my boy found a new home and I'm back in grad school.

I feel like I'm never going to get my riding into gear. I'm not even that interested in showing on a bigger than local level (well, once I get into training again I'm betting I will be but financially that's just not going to be in the picture). I went to my old barn and hacked some over Christmas and realized that I'm officially no longer an effective rider. Can I still do it? Yes! But do I have more bad habbits than I can count or even know about? You betcha. So now I'm extra motivated to find a good lesson program and whip myself into shape with lots of no stirrup and flat work and also a bit intimidated that I'll get to a barn and realize that I'm even worse than I think. But hey-that's what instructors are there to fix! It has always been a dream of mine to retrain an OTTB and, given my budget, it's certainly a good thing!

I'm in Louisiana (and can probably guarantee that none of you are :lol:) While we're dreaming of this horse-I am all for big with lots of personality. Some days he/she is allowed to be push button because it's nice to have a break, but I also like a challenge so quirky/off days are definitely permitted!

caradino
Jan. 7, 2010, 01:34 PM
i'm so excited about our club =] yay for encouraging each other!

i'm in north/central jersey...

JumpinBean17
Jan. 7, 2010, 07:00 PM
yay! Love our little group! I feel so much better... far less discouraged and way more motivated... to bad its going to snow and is like 15 degrees out right now lol... Im out in Massachusetts

rideforthelaurels16
Jan. 7, 2010, 07:28 PM
How about international-level good? Ignoring the fact that getting to the top is such a combination of money, luck, chance, talent, determination, etc. I mean, can you really get serious about training in your late teens/twenties and still "make it"?
I've always had the dream and the drive, but not the money or the horse. Now I have the horse to at least get me started down the road (and what a horse he is <3), but is it too late? Is a successful junior career a necessary ingredient to eventually produce top-level riding? I want to say yes, but I'd love to hear others' stories!

meupatdoes
Jan. 7, 2010, 08:43 PM
How about international-level good? Ignoring the fact that getting to the top is such a combination of money, luck, chance, talent, determination, etc. I mean, can you really get serious about training in your late teens/twenties and still "make it"?
I've always had the dream and the drive, but not the money or the horse. Now I have the horse to at least get me started down the road (and what a horse he is <3), but is it too late? Is a successful junior career a necessary ingredient to eventually produce top-level riding? I want to say yes, but I'd love to hear others' stories!

Michael Matz did.
And then he turned around and did it in racing too.


And no you do not need a junior career.

rideforthelaurels16
Jan. 7, 2010, 11:46 PM
I never knew that about MM! So good to know. :)

goeslikestink
Jan. 7, 2010, 11:48 PM
its never to late to learn as long as you dont make the same mistakes and you learn by your mistakes

caradino
Jan. 8, 2010, 09:11 AM
How about international-level good? Ignoring the fact that getting to the top is such a combination of money, luck, chance, talent, determination, etc. I mean, can you really get serious about training in your late teens/twenties and still "make it"?
I've always had the dream and the drive, but not the money or the horse. Now I have the horse to at least get me started down the road (and what a horse he is <3), but is it too late? Is a successful junior career a necessary ingredient to eventually produce top-level riding? I want to say yes, but I'd love to hear others' stories!

debbie mcdonald didn't make it to her first olympics until she was 50!

she started out in hunterland too i believe, and only switched to dressage later in life.

jingles to you now that you have "the" horse! GOOD LUCK!

jumpingmaya
Jan. 8, 2010, 11:28 AM
Can I be in... can I be in....??? :winkgrin: I'm 23 years old.
Well I got to show/ride when I was in my teens... actually got to ride some really nice horses while boarding my mare at a nice show barn... I'd ride from 8 AM to 6 PM on saturdays and sundays... work 40 hours a week to pay for said mare to be there and was a full time college student (graduated from HS at 16- International student :) ). So... said mare got hurt in pasture when I was 18... met boyfriend... moved mare to different barn as I couldn't afford/justify paying big bucks while she had 1 year of stall rest. Mare semi-came back into work. Had serious problems after that year of stall rest... decided she could just be my trail horse (she was 7 at the time)... did that for about 2 years... then she passed away 7 months ago. Her splean ruptured in her stall (I don't know if you can say that the poor mare was cursed.. or if I was... spent more money in vet bills than I'd like to imagine :no:)
Quit riding for 6 months (was devastated... she was my baby)... got out of a 4 year relationship.. and found my new girl... then a month later, graduated from college (FINALLY)!!! So here I am :)
I WANT to be successfully doing the high A/O's... and this mare has everything going to take me there... well eventually anyways... so this thread gave me HOPE!!!! :winkgrin:
It's not too late... I finally have the time... working on the "money" part.. and have the horse!!! YEAH!!! Let's make 2010 a good year ok... because 2009 was absolute CRAP!
And good luck to everyone who has big dreams :yes:

Spud&Saf
Jan. 8, 2010, 11:55 AM
I am 26 and only the past year do I feel as though I am starting to make progress in my riding.

I have finally moved up to rated shows, and did my first season where I did quite well, despite my limited budget. I have lucked into a great horse on a free lease who I love dearly and who can help me move up (even though she is getting the winter off).

I have had also the opportunity to ride some nice horses through being willing to work hard and ride anything. I have had some luck in finding people who need riders, and who weren't afraid to give me a chance.

All I can say is that attitude is everything at this age. Be willing to work hard, be humble, care for each horse like it's your own and you will be surprised at what kind of opportunities come your way.

I also found a great trainer through another trainer I worked with that left the area. Despite my limited finances, this trainer has taken me on as client and I think a lot of that has to do with my attitude and my dedication. I feel like I am learning in leaps and bounds, even though we only school once or twice a week...and not on my horse, but whatever he has for me to ride. (Can't afford board at his place, my barn has no indoor, but I'm making do!)

I don't think it's too late to be good for me...I am on the upswing and I don't want to use my lack of finances as a cop-out for not progressing. I just have to think outside the box and be willing to work harder to get where I want to be.