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mroades
Dec. 24, 2009, 06:57 PM
For whatever reason, jewish, muslim, atheist...what do those folks do for the next 36 hours??

equinelaw
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:03 PM
Off Topic day! And barn sit for those that do:winkgrin:

mroades
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:05 PM
haha...i am feeding for my BO tomorrow so she can relax a little...been tough for her since I "retired" on the 1st of December. Of course its supposed to POUR all day tomorrow

equinelaw
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:11 PM
Yep, and I will have to clean a stall for the first time since 2003? Horse must stay dry, so I can "play" like I work but only 1 stall and the rest of the time just get soaking wet! Its all good. What says holidays more then happy warm horses tucked into a nice clean stall?

I am watching Buffy again. Its been almost 10 years since I saw season 1 and everybody new to it makes it sound so fun, so why not? That will keep me busy until NYE!

Daydream Believer
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:11 PM
Go hiking on the Appalachian Trail!

Sakura Hill Farm
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:12 PM
Lots go skiing! The slopes are relatively empty.

Simkie
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:33 PM
I sleep in and hang out in my pjs. Not very exciting!

I do enjoy the 16 days off in a row, while only using 48 hours of PTO.

Chall
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:35 PM
Simkie, what do you do. That sounds like off shore oil rig schedules!

Dad Said Not To
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:39 PM
We had our family celebration with my parents earlier this week due to work schedules. As a paramedic with little seniority, SO works most holidays, so we have to be flexible with our celebrations.

I would be working, but my employer told me to stay home due to the 10+ inches of snow that we're supposed to get between tonight and Saturday morning, so I'll probably end up cleaning and doing all the things around the house that I never have time to do during a normal week. SO will be working a 16-hour overnight shift starting at 3pm tomorrow-- the ambulance service provides catered dinners on Thanksgiving and Christmas, but I may also send a pumpkin pie for him to share around the fire station.

Ibex
Dec. 24, 2009, 07:42 PM
Currently watching a Star Wars Marathon. Yes, I am a geek.

Tomorrow morning I'm doing the barn so the BO can have a morning with family.

Pookah
Dec. 24, 2009, 08:17 PM
Have a fabulous, stress-free, peaceful day :). Most years I end up helping out with the barn so that the barn owner can have Christmas off. And it sounds terrible, but a good friend and I started a tradition years ago of going to the movies and then to a bar in a local hotel (so that it's open). We have a great time, friends always end up escaping their families to join us, and it's all in all a very fun day.

Guin
Dec. 24, 2009, 08:28 PM
My Jewish in-laws go to the Caribbean or some similar warm and tropical place! Sounds pretty good to me.

paint hunter
Dec. 24, 2009, 08:45 PM
I am covering emergency call for my colleagues who aren't working.

ToN Farm
Dec. 24, 2009, 08:55 PM
Many of us that don't celebrate the holidays just spend them the same as we would any other day. The web is always open as is cable tv.:)

Bluey
Dec. 24, 2009, 09:04 PM
Not having to celebrate Christmas lets you have a day you know no one will be coming around to bug you, because everyone else is...celebrating Christmas.
This is the Bible Belt, after all.

I change the combination on the lock, in case some forget themselves and want to spread the cheer.:p

redkat
Dec. 24, 2009, 09:05 PM
Currently watching a Star Wars Marathon. Yes, I am a geek.

Omg, THANK YOU for telling us about this! I just turned it on. :)

Renn/aissance
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:05 PM
I stay in bed until noon eating jelly beans and reading fanfiction. I look forward to it all year!

caffeinated
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:07 PM
I'm an atheist. But I love Christmas*, so will be doing the whole family dinner and gift exchange thing, and all :)

It's more a family/cultural thing than a religious thing, anyway. *grin*


* eta: well, parts of christmas, like being home, having a delicious breakfast, and the lights and decorations and pies. Not so much the exhausting and mind numbing shopathon, which just leaves me cranky.

mroades
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:08 PM
I guess my real question was WHY you don't celebrate it? Religion, choice, no choice(work, etc)
I am so disgusted by how commercial it has become, and i have no real family so I dont celebrate by choice.

ToN Farm
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:15 PM
mroades, do you think the majority of people that celebrate Christmas do so for religious reasons? Some do, but I don't think that is the case with most.

I think it is more of a social festive thing for those that celebrate. A time to get together with family or party with friends. Of course, those families with children celebrate it for Santa.

People have been saying that Christmas is commercialized for decades.

mroades
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:25 PM
well, I think it is supposed to be for religious reasons. I am just exploring some stuff in my head and I like to hear other people's viewpoints. I loved Christmas as a child, but I have a hard time reconciling Jesus and Santa in my head. Yikes, I think I need to go to a comedy club or something!

caffeinated
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:28 PM
I was listening to the author of scroogenomics on the way home from MD yesterday, and they talked a lot about the history of christmas commercialization - it's not new at all... they pulled out some quote from Harriet Beecher Stowe that sounded like it could have described my day at the shopping center today.

Bluey
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:31 PM
Growing up, Christmas was only the day we had special meals and church services.
January 5 we left cookies and milk on a table and the morning of the 6th is the day the three magi had eaten the cookies, drank the milk and left presents in the living room for all.:cool:

Santa Claus was a scary fellow that came around December 6th, I think, dragging a sack full of fruits and a hand made broom and came into the school rooms and read from a big, long book, calling names and telling us if we had been good and giving us fruit and if we had been bad, he threated to use his broom on us if we didn't straighten up, which we readily promised, scared to death.:eek:

Different costums in different cultures.

mroades
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:33 PM
Twelfth Night! We were just talking about this today. I know, theres not really anything new....I just happen to believe we are repeating the rise and fall of Rome at the moment...history always repeats.

caffeinated
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:38 PM
well, I think it is supposed to be for religious reasons. I am just exploring some stuff in my head and I like to hear other people's viewpoints. I loved Christmas as a child, but I have a hard time reconciling Jesus and Santa in my head. Yikes, I think I need to go to a comedy club or something!

Keep in mind I'm as nonreligious as it gets. Anyway, here's my thoughts on the holiday itself and how it's related to religion.

Jesus wasn't born on Dec. 25. Or in December at all, probably. Most likely he was born in the spring, if you read about the things going on around the time he was born in the bible (pilgrimages and baby sheep and all that).

At the same time, winter solstice celebrations have existed for thousands of years prior to Jesus - pagan religions celebrated it as it symbolized light returning to the world, and a lot of the things we do now came from those celebrations (the trees and lights and feasting and such, and probably the gift giving too).

So, when churchy types were trying to convert people, they realized that thebirth of Jesus fit right in with a lot of the existing symbolism of winter solstice holidays. So why not celebrate them at the same time? Those who are religious celebrate a person. Those who are not celebrate a cultural tradition that goes back thousands of years before Christ. Both celebrations are essentially about the same thing, the return of light (either literal or symbolic) to the world.

So, on that level, I think Santa and Jesus can coexist just fine, and regardless of which "version" of the holiday you celebrate, you can call it whatever you want. I'd have a solstice celebration on the 21st but my family is catholic, so it just doesn't make sense. :)

Pookah
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:41 PM
I don't celebrate it because I'm Jewish. But every year I find that more and more of my friends want to be Jewish for the month of December because they don't like the stress that comes along with Christmas.

mroades
Dec. 24, 2009, 10:51 PM
things that make you go hmmmmm.

Comparative Religion was the only class in high school that I enjoyed (only class taught by a phd as I recall). I got an A on the essay exam. I remember thinking that Buddhism and Judaism were the only two that held any attraction for me. Mind you I went to Catholic school for 2nd through 8th grade...but never went to church for two reasons. 1. almost always at a horse show:D 2. Even then I thought organized religion was mostly a bunch of hooey

cwill
Dec. 24, 2009, 11:12 PM
I've spent 23 years trying to figure out what to do Christmas day. Parents are Jehovah's Witnesses, so no holidays. Unlike most on this thread, I really wish I was celebrating the holidays. Anyway, I'll probably take the the dogs to the beach and drink hot chocolate and ride the horse.

GrayTbred
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:53 AM
I volunteered to help with the night haying and barn closing this evening.

And I plan to participate in the cherished Jewish tradition of seeing a movie and/or eating Chinese food on Christmas Day.

Alterago
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:56 AM
Santa Claus was a scary fellow that came around December 6th, I think, dragging a sack full of fruits and a hand made broom and came into the school rooms and read from a big, long book, calling names and telling us if we had been good and giving us fruit and if we had been bad, he threated to use his broom on us if we didn't straighten up, which we readily promised, scared to death.:eek:

Different costums in different cultures.

You make Santa Claus sound like Baba Yaga! :lol:

JenEM
Dec. 25, 2009, 02:39 AM
I kind of ditto caffinated. My immediate family is not religious, and I personally am somewhere between agnostic and atheist. From a spiritual point of view, December 25th is just another day. But the idea of celebrating family and togetherness isn't a bad one. We celebrated yesterday and today, with some good food and gifts and alcohol. (I question my mother's choice of pina coladas in December, but hey, its festive!)

Tomorrow (um, later tonight?) I'll be working. I'm fine with that, and am actually happy to work holidays, and have a job where working them isn't optional.

Threebars
Dec. 25, 2009, 04:15 AM
Currently watching a Star Wars Marathon. Yes, I am a geek.


JUSt got off work, and bit a small miracle actually have tomorrow off - unfortunately, too poor to 'do' anything, but if they keep it going I'll be a happy hamster!

Mark Hammil *drooooooooooooooooooool*

I met him and Carrie last January and both actors are REAL sweethearts, and at nearly 60, Mark has the HOTTEST rear this side of a racetrack!

Bluey
Dec. 25, 2009, 08:45 AM
You make Santa Claus sound like Baba Yaga! :lol:

I did believe he was real, because he knew stuff no one else could have known about me.:eek:

Of course, because it was my father for many years that dressed the part and knocked on classroom doors.:p

fordtraktor
Dec. 25, 2009, 08:54 AM
well, I think it is supposed to be for religious reasons. I am just exploring some stuff in my head and I like to hear other people's viewpoints. I loved Christmas as a child, but I have a hard time reconciling Jesus and Santa in my head. Yikes, I think I need to go to a comedy club or something!

Santa is a Catholic invention -- old Saint Nicholas. So really the two go hand in hand -- but that doesn't help you reconciling the religious with nonreligious aspects of the holiday.

alicen
Dec. 25, 2009, 09:08 AM
Fill-in for the barn owner and enjoy quiet, quality time with the horses.

Daydream Believer
Dec. 25, 2009, 09:38 AM
Interesting also is that Solstice or Yule, in the Pagan tradition, celebrates also the birth of a God....again this predates Christianity by thousands of years. The Goddess (the moon) gives birth to the God (represented by the sun) and as he grows the days grow longer also while the Goddess rests. That at least is the Wiccan tradition as I've learned it.

As to why I don't celebrate...I do celebrate a holiday...just not sure it's Christmas in the Christian sense. Those who said that the time and much of the trappings of Christmas are pagan are correct. It is very much so...as is Easter which is also timed at the same time as another major Pagan holiday.

So to me, a vacation that gets me away from the hustle, bustle and extreme commercialism of Christmas is generally the best for my nerves and piece of mind. I really do find it all very obnoxious these days with the commercial push to the season.

beaulilly
Dec. 25, 2009, 10:49 AM
Since the Starbucks that was supposed to be open wasn't, DH has been frantically driving all over the city trying to find a Starbucks that is open. His panic finally gave way to reason and he called me so I could check online for him:winkgrin:. God, it sucks to be addicted to caffeine!! If anyone in Lex is on the same boat, the one on High and Ashland is open.

Oh, and we used to do the presents and dinner with family until we moved 2000 miles away from them. Now, we just pay the bills and splurge on Starbucks instead. We are not religious but look at Christmas as more of a social thing.

tle
Dec. 25, 2009, 10:57 AM
We don't have any set non-Christmas traditions but we don't celebrate it. Today we're doing Sushi Cafe for lunch (since they're open and I love sushi), then going to see Sherlock Holmes, then dinner with friends.

glfprncs
Dec. 25, 2009, 10:57 AM
My husband and I don't do much for Christmas because when he was 16 years old, he woke up on Christmas morning, went to wake his dad, and found him unresponsive. They didn't realize it, but years of alchohol abuse (he had been sober for 6 months at this point) caused him to become diabetic (didn't know yet, so it was untreated) and he had slipped into a coma on Christmas Eve while sleeping. He never recovered.

Over the next 3 weeks the circulation in his father's legs deteriorated so badly that if he survived he would require amputation. He then developed the flu, then pneumonia, then literally started bleeding internally from so many areas that he couldn't be saved. Not a very merry Christmas memory.

So...no decorations, very little gift giving, just business as usual except that I, as a teacher, get an extended break. I woke up at the normal hour, walked all 3 dogs, and am getting ready to workout.

Chris, my husband, enjoyed a Ghost Hunter's marathon for about 6 hours last night, and he's now watching mindless shows on the Sci-Fi Channel.

msj
Dec. 25, 2009, 11:07 AM
Many of us that don't celebrate the holidays just spend them the same as we would any other day. The web is always open as is cable tv.:)

Yep, that and I have a couple of Harry Potter movies to watch! Fed the horses some extra carrots in their breakfast and will do so at dinner as well. I've got a yummy prime rib for dinner along with Brie cheese and shrimp as appetizers. Someone else is bringing dessert! No gifts exchanged.

Even though I was raised Lutheran with Church and Sunday School every Sunday, I stopped believing in 'organized religion' (the church and all it stands for) years ago. I believe the Bible is a lovely story at times but I don't believe much of it. Most stories that are handed down from generation to generation get some new twists with each telling. Also try the parlor game of whispering a short story to one person and having that person tell the next person and so on for about 6 or more people. Have the last person tell the final story and it's very unlikely it will be anything like the story that was started. :D

BigHorseLittleHorse
Dec. 25, 2009, 11:14 AM
(Jewish) When we were kids, my dad used to take us skiing every Christmas. As teenagers, we used to fill in for the BO at the barn where we boarded.

Now I'm at a co-op barn, so I'll be feeding and doing stalls tonight. Last night I went with my parents to see Avatar in Imax 3D. Holy cow, that was awesome...

translation services
Dec. 25, 2009, 11:17 AM
watch all the epsiodes of Absolutely Fabulous in order.

Griffyn
Dec. 25, 2009, 11:22 AM
Making time and 1/2 --working 16 hours.
In Prison.

If Im not in prison for Christmas, I spend it with family, or go to a real movie in a theatre- a big treat!

wendy
Dec. 25, 2009, 11:30 AM
I can't stand christmas. Hate hate hate hate hate the stupid gift-exchanges. Also feel bad for all the people who are so hypocritical about celebrating a religious holiday when they clearly aren't religious in any way.

We celebrate "solstice week" by getting up at the crack of dawn (ha ha it's not that early this time of year) every day and going out and running joyously through the woods. Then I catch up on work and housecleaning, and then we eat good stuff. Some years we have a bonfire, into which we toss the disgusting junk various people insist on gifting us with every year. After all it's the thought that counts, right? phone us and give us the thought not the junk.

birdsong
Dec. 25, 2009, 11:31 AM
I guess my real question was WHY you don't celebrate it? Religion, choice, no choice(work, etc)
I am so disgusted by how commercial it has become, and i have no real family so I dont celebrate by choice.


There you go...same here. I will go to a few dinners because I have too....then relax, clean house or not, and do just what I WANT TO DO.
I am not involved in the madness of shopping and spending money that I don't have. I observe the incredible pressure of people spending money and stressing over presents. That is not what its all about.

Bluey
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:02 PM
There you go...same here. I will go to a few dinners because I have too....then relax, clean house or not, and do just what I WANT TO DO.
I am not involved in the madness of shopping and spending money that I don't have. I observe the incredible pressure of people spending money and stressing over presents. That is not what its all about.



I think Christmas any more is, other than for some very religious christians, about the kids, with cute, sweet kid's stories and presents kids look forward to.
A family type celebration to get all together and visit and catch up.

For those families that don't have such traditions or those without families, well, the shine is not there, so why force a false holiday spirit?

Chall
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:22 PM
I did believe he was real, because he knew stuff no one else could have known about me.:eek:

Of course, because it was my father for many years that dressed the part and knocked on classroom doors.:p
Bluey are you northern European? Santa is not fat, and kind of scary and gruff. And my Dad dressed up as Santa too, until I caught on that his shoes were just like my Dad's and then I caught on to the wedding ring being the same too. But he could do the scary pretty well. "Has everyone in this house been GOOD?!" Of course he was a sweet man IRL.

shawneeAcres
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:26 PM
WEll although we celebrate, I still have all the barn work etc to do. Our "christmas" with the family is before Christmas, so today we went down, fed and turned out horses then came back and had a breakfast, hubby opened the gifts (clothes!) I gave him, he gave me this compueter back in August so that was my gift! Now baking a few things to go to one of my students houses for dinner, then stalls and feeding! Same old thing! LOL

Bluey
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:32 PM
Bluey are you northern European? Santa is not fat, and kind of scary and gruff. And my Dad dressed up as Santa too, until I caught on that his shoes were just like my Dad's and then I caught on to the wedding ring being the same too. But he could do the scary pretty well. "Has everyone in this house been GOOD?!" Of course he was a sweet man IRL.

Our Saint Nicklaus with the burlap sack full of goodies, scary broom, tell-all big long book and serious voice was not fat either.

All kids did get some fruit, but you sure sweated it while he was checking you in that book.:lol:

lalahartma1
Dec. 25, 2009, 12:54 PM
Watching stuff on Hulu and Netflix and eating Stahmann's Zias. Playing with the dogs, hiking. :)

foggybok
Dec. 25, 2009, 02:27 PM
I grew up Unitarian and our minister was Jewish, so Christmas was not really about religion in our family. It was about family and tradition though. I have many fond Christmas Eve memories (although I could forget the lutefisk....:) ). I'm one of those strange people that likes spending time with my family over the holidays..... This year we stayed here and had some friends over... So for me it's about time with family and friends...... I have banned gift giving here, but my hubby keeps cheating anyway.....

Melyni
Dec. 25, 2009, 02:42 PM
Being as non-religious as it gets, I spend the day reading, sleeping, eating etc. I usually go down to the barn to help out so that others with family/religious requirements can go and do their duty.

Back in the days when I worked for a living! I would volunteer to work on Christmas Day so that others could have the day off.


As others have mentioned, Jesus was not born on Dec 25th, the Bible does not say so, it was more probably in the Spring. However the early Christian Church co-opeted the old Mid Winter festival, I believe it was called Beltane, as a Christian holiday and decided to say that Jesus was born on this day.
They couldn't stop the people celebrating it anyway so they just co-opted it.

Notice it occurs a bout 3-5 days AFTER the Winter solstice (In Northern Europe where the holiday started) when one could measure the lengthening of the days and knew that Spring would be coming (eventually).

It wasn't really a holiday until the 19th century anyway, and it didn't get wide spread until the turn of the 20th century.
Prior to that it was just work as usual, except for the Mid Winter festival.

For those of yo for whom it has meaning, have a significant festival, for those of us for whom it has no meaning, we will happily enjoy the goodwill and feasting that goes with it.
Yours
MW

Paragon
Dec. 25, 2009, 03:09 PM
I spend time with family. We eat many foods and exchange gifts and tell many stories. Nothing exceptional. :)

prairiewind2
Dec. 25, 2009, 03:35 PM
Atheist here. But I still like the getting-together-with-family thing, big dinners, general good-will-toward-men thing (even if only for a day) - plus I love giving gifts. So I'm an atheist who celebrates the general intention of Christmas, without celebrating it in a religious way. Unfortunately, had to cancel plans to visit family this year, so will be spending a quiet holiday with my husband and furry family. Still having a big dinner though - making a traditional Cuban Christmas dinner (though I'm not Cuban either).:lol:

pintopiaffe
Dec. 25, 2009, 03:52 PM
Well, I celebrate it in the Religious sense, but not in the commercial sense. So while I do go to church, I then work usually.

I worked 10 yesterday, then was off for four and back for six. Got out at 0600 this AM. It's actually the first Christmas I haven't worked a 12 or 14 on the actual *day* in about twenty years.

So... I work. And do chores. And today I am cooking and drinking Sam Adams just like any day off. T'mow back to work. ;)

Adelita
Dec. 25, 2009, 03:53 PM
Why don't I celebrate Christmas?

No money. Really. It sucks.

teddygirl
Dec. 25, 2009, 04:31 PM
I don't celebrate Christmas since I'm Jewish. Last night we did the required Chinese-food-and-movie thing. Today I rode and am cuddling with the dog under the electric blanket. Wonderful. I always found it funny that friends thought I'd be sad not celebrating on Christmas. It's actually a wonderful, quiet day. And think of all I've saved on ornaments and decorations!

Simkie
Dec. 25, 2009, 04:37 PM
For those families that don't have such traditions or those without families, well, the shine is not there, so why force a false holiday spirit?

Ayup. No family here.

After mom died, I tried to do Christmas with various friends families, and it just felt so very, very fake and sad. So now I skip it. No decorating, no shopping. No Christmas songs. It's a hard time of year for me--my mom died in November--and it's just best for my to try to not notice the festivities.

And today, I stayed in bed until 1 pm. :D

Dad Said Not To
Dec. 25, 2009, 04:39 PM
As others have mentioned, Jesus was not born on Dec 25th, the Bible does not say so, it was more probably in the Spring. However the early Christian Church co-opeted the old Mid Winter festival, I believe it was called Beltane, as a Christian holiday and decided to say that Jesus was born on this day.
They couldn't stop the people celebrating it anyway so they just co-opted it.

Notice it occurs a bout 3-5 days AFTER the Winter solstice (In Northern Europe where the holiday started) when one could measure the lengthening of the days and knew that Spring would be coming (eventually).


Beltane is May Day. The Church took over pagan solstice celebrations such as Yule and Saturnalia for Christmas festivities.

pintopiaffe
Dec. 25, 2009, 05:46 PM
NPR or BBC had a piece on my way home from work this morning saying something about the Annunciation and the Visitation (Mary to Elizabeth) and that's how they came up with December.

Seeing as Easter is the first Sunday after the first full moon after the Equinox... I'm more inclined to believe we made it around Solstice so the faithful would have something to distract them from the heathen... :lol: :winkgrin:

I do find it interesting that I *don't* 'celebrate' it for the same reasons as those who have NO beliefs about it.

I will say I MUST watch "A Christmas Story" at least once while I'm working to make the holiday complete.

Melyni
Dec. 25, 2009, 05:49 PM
Beltane is May Day. The Church took over pagan solstice celebrations such as Yule and Saturnalia for Christmas festivities.

just wasn't sure which one!

Enjoy it what ever it's called.
MW

dixiedolphin
Dec. 25, 2009, 06:31 PM
I spent the day cleaning the apartment top to bottom. It's so nice to have a free day off work where I'm not running from to place constantly, so I basically just caught up on housework and used the time to make some more work-intensive meals that i usually don't have time to do during the week. It's been both relaxing and productive, can't beat that!

mroades
Dec. 25, 2009, 06:55 PM
hhhmm Yuletide, I like that

Bluey
Dec. 25, 2009, 07:08 PM
---"... what do people who don't celebrate christmas do?"---

They read on COTH about what those that celebrate are doing.:winkgrin:

mroades
Dec. 25, 2009, 07:12 PM
Haha Bluey, I was thinking..the eggnog certainly hasnt upped the percentage of "reading for content"

BravAddict
Dec. 26, 2009, 11:41 AM
Well, I don't believe in an after-life, or god(s), but I do believe in family and culture, so Christmas it is! Although with my step-dad recovering from surgery on Christmas eve, it was not terribly festive here.

The television told me that historically, Christians haven't really been into celebrating birthdays anyway, and Christmas was not a big religious thing. Of course many of us are familiar with Saturnalia and other winter celebrations. But even if the notion of early Christians trying to convert the pagan Europeans with "Ohh sweet party, yeah, we have one of those, too!" makes you squirm, well...in an agricultural society, when you're getting scant daylight hours, what the hell else is there to do but party?

A man on a TV program about Christmas trees read a quote from 900 AD. The person who wrote it was talking about the extravagant gift-giving around Christmas.

Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote that talking about the vulgarity of one's modern life and the "good old days" is just a symptom of old age (and an individual's resistance to change) present in every generation.