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View Full Version : If I could design you own barn... What would you put in it?



vita_impavida
Dec. 18, 2009, 12:28 PM
If you were building your own barn, what would you put in for convenience and safety? Lets go down to the nitty gritty. I want to know what people want in barns they board at, and things they would change in their own barn.

I am also having issues with the flooring....

I do plan on breeding in the future, so the softer the floors the better, and I do plan on taking on a few boarders, so I want good quality flooring for them.

I had originally decided on regular stall mats, but when looking into cost for purchase and disposal of the amount of bedding I would need it became quiet expensive, and inconvenient.

Someone recommended this comfort stall flooring. I looked into it, and it sounded great! Cushy for the horses, and less bedding required, since it is just for cleanliness. So I went to look at some at a distributer, and I really like it. I want to go with it, but figured I would ask to see if anyone uses it and how they like it.

Look forward to hearing what you all have to say!! :winkgrin:

SmartAlex
Dec. 18, 2009, 12:32 PM
All stalls would be built of oak and have the angle iron installed.

GFCI outlets at every stall for a heated bucket, or a fancy heated automatic waterer.

Built in barn safe fans.

Windows and outside doors to every stall.

Heated tack/feed rooms. In the floor would be my choice.

Hot water and a large sink.

Well thought out lockers/equipment storage

mroades
Dec. 18, 2009, 12:52 PM
overhang! Our barn has none and it makes days like this really special

ChocoMare
Dec. 18, 2009, 01:47 PM
Basic design attached :)

Each Stall would have

--Whole-Stall Mats
--GFCI outlets outside
--Auto Waterers
--Slow-feed hay feeders

spotnnotfarm
Dec. 18, 2009, 02:01 PM
I agree with an overhang! We have one and it is not only wonderful on nasty days but great in the summer for shade! Today it is raining buckets and I put hay underneath it and leave them out. I love it!

Another thing about my property that I love is that we have a separate barn for hay/feed/trailer storage. I never have to worry about anyone breaking into the feed room. However, I wish we had a space down at the barn for a few days worth of hay/shavings storage like in Chocomares plans.

I will have to disagree about Stall Skins. I wanted them badly but I am thankful I went with regular mats. My friend has Stall Skins in all of her stalls and has had a lot of problems. One of her horses pawed a hole in them while he was on stall rest and some of the stalls have had it come off the wall in areas so shavings get underneath it. I am not sure if she did not install them correctly but they did not work for her.

ChocoMare
Dec. 18, 2009, 02:03 PM
Oooh, didn't know that about the Skins. NEVERMIND...I'll stick with mats! :D

spotnnotfarm
Dec. 18, 2009, 02:11 PM
I was surprised too! When we were adding mats we considered them but thankfully I asked her first. She would not have them again. I would love to know if this is the norm.

dmalbone
Dec. 18, 2009, 02:26 PM
I've heard bad things about stall skins as well. I have heard great things about comfort stall and the like though. I WILL have those in my barn one day though. :) I have heard that it's necessary to have them over concrete though just so you know.

I had to build a "budget barn" but there are certain things that I would not change and would have in any barn-
overhangs over the dutch doors so I can keep them locked out but still protected from rain. I actually have a gfi outlet on each side under the overhang to keep the heated trough/muck bucket so I don't have to use an extension cord.

outside doors on every stall. I will sleep so much easier at night knowing all I have to do is throw a door open in the case of a fire and they'd have more of a chance of surviving. Plus, in the cases that my COPD horse has to stay in there is TONS of cross ventilation and he's still standing with his head out the door.

Separate hay storage in a different barn

outlets for every stall so there are no extension cords for any buckets. (like another poster mentioned though- preferably heated automatic waterers).

We're on such a budget that it's hard to imagine having everything I want, but those would be top on my list. :) Oh yeah... also throw in a security system and fire alarm/sprinkler system for good measure. :)

llsc
Dec. 18, 2009, 05:05 PM
I have a bank barn that has a one story drop behind it on to concrete. I just throw the manure out the back of the barn and hubby comes along with the tractor bucket and scoops it up every so often. It's the most awesome thing ever.

I also have outlets in my ceilings and can plug in extra flourescent shop lights if I need more light somewhere. I just tack them up by the chains.

Ground Fault outlets outside each stall is a must. I need heated buckets where I live, so they are awesome. I drilled a hole in each stall front and run the plug through to the outside.

I have regular stall mats over concrete and they don't move around and seem to have enough cusion for most horses.

I also love that my pasture is attached to my barn. I just open the door and let everyone out and in. Makes life quick and simple.

CDE Driver
Dec. 18, 2009, 08:25 PM
Oh, this is something I have been dreaming about! :)

I would have at least 12 x 14 stalls with the comfort stall mats.

Heated aisle floors.

GFI outlets at each stall for heated buckets. Water that won't freeze to each stall.

Wash stall with hot/cold water.

Well insulated tack room with an industrial size washer/dryer.

Well insulated feed room with big sink and hot/cold water, full size refrigerator/freezer.

Each stall having dutch doors to the outside and runs off of each stall. At least an 8' overhang. Drop down grill in the front of the stalls so horses can have their heads out to the aisle.

I would love an Equisizer in a covered building with all weather footing.

Bravestrom
Dec. 18, 2009, 08:53 PM
I have soft stalls and I love them - we have two heavy pawers - they paw at meal times and they are 1/2 drafts and they have not gone through it.

I love them and would never have stalls without them or have my horses boarded in facilities that didn't have them in the stalls - we have had them since 2005.

vita_impavida
Dec. 18, 2009, 09:07 PM
Wow!! I was totally on the right track! Thank you everyone!! My father is an electrician, so the outlets were beyond a given. I wanted an overhang, but as pretty much everyone can agree... there is a financial limit. Lol!!

I have arranged my tack/feed/storage all on the one side of the aisle, so the opposite side is all stalls. The full stall side I had planned on putting dutch doors to the outside for each stall, and thats the side I want my overhang on, but Im afraid the barn will look all sorts of wonky if I dont have it on both sides. Your thoughts?

Also, IF I do the over hang, what kind of base/floor would you suggest. I wanted concrete... but have you seen the cost of concrete!? :D So then, we were talking about a compact stone, but stone... and horse-shoes dont get along. Any suggestions would be totally appreciated.

What are your opinions on the European stall fronts? Do you feel they are safe? I LOVE the look, but the important thing is if they are safe. They are also super open which increases ventilation.

Thank you everyone for the input!!! The best way to have good ideas is to have ideas!! :)

dmalbone
Dec. 18, 2009, 09:50 PM
I love the european stall fronts. I've not heard anyone complain about safety- the only thing is that if you have horses in the aisle the other ones can reach their heads out. I have half walls though so obviously it doesn't bother me that much.

About the overhang... I'm sure they vary greatly but it was more economical to add an overhang than build a freestanding shelter. We just have two 8 ft. ones (24' long each) and it was about $1800-ish I want to say. I don't think it would look funny on one side at all. I've seen it that way before. I have mine going the opposite direction than they usually do (most you see follow the roofline and mine are different-cant explain, look at pics in blog if you want :) ) its all about functionality!

JumpWithPanache
Dec. 18, 2009, 10:03 PM
One thing that I absolutely loved at one barn I rode/drove for was the feed room. He had old avocado green chest freezers as the feed bins. Not only did they lend a great retro vibe to the room, they also kept ALL critters out. Above the freezers was a rack system of sorts which allowed the feed scoops to be turned upside down without having to tilt them so the scoop side is against the wall and the handle side facing out. If/when I build a barn, I'm definitely holding out for some dead retro freezers. :D

Sparky
Dec. 18, 2009, 10:35 PM
I did design my barn, and there's not a lot about it I would change. Morton built it 14 years ago, and it still looks new. There are 24 12x12 stalls made of 2" tongue and groove white pine, with mesh sliding doors, and bars between the stalls so we can look down the whole row and see who's in, out or laying down. All stalls are matted, and there is a kickboard across the door front to keep shavings in. Each stall also has a blanket holder,an overhead fan and most have a window, and a wooden box that holds turnout boots and lead ropes.

Tack room with plenty of room for trunks, saddle and bridle racks
Laundry room with washer dryer and tons of storage for blankets
Lounge with full kitchen, full bath with shower, and viewing area to indoor
Grooming stalls, with overhead, as well as low lights that the vet and farrier love. And a vacuum
Wash stall with overhead heater, and 4" lip that keeps the water in, and an oversize drain in a back corner
Feed room
Separate hay and shavings barn
6 horse Euro-cizer and 6 two acre grass paddocks, as well as 3 smaller ones. We turn out either singly or 2 at a time for 5 hours
The indoor as well as the stables are heated
Footing in the indoor is laser leveled twice a year and has sand/permaflex rubber footing
A concrete manure pit, and once a month removal by dumpster
Fly predators in the summer months!

Some things I considered but chose not to do for various reasons:
Automatic waterers
In floor heat
Stall door feeders
Drop down stall doors

Things I would do differently:
Have a dedicated area for the farrier and vet that they could drive right into
Put the Exerciser in the main indoor
More windows in the indoor

It was a fun process to see the barn grow from a few drawings to the finished product, and I'd love to do it again, only this time with 6 stalls max!

gdolapp
Dec. 18, 2009, 11:29 PM
If I were to build my own barn I would build a really big pole building.
At one end I would put in a nice two level living quarters with the upper
level having a deck inside overlooking the riding arena the lower
level would have a cement patio facing the same way.
In front of the living quarters just inside the building would be room enough
to park two vehicles.
I would have two big slide open doors on each side of areana so truck
and trailer can be driven through and trailer could be parked inside
in winter time. at the other end of the building I would have a total of six
stalls. Four of them for horses, one would be built into a tack room
and the other woulld be for feed. I would have a hay loft above
with small trap doors that open down to each stall above each hay mainger.
and a big double door that slides open at the end. Outside I would have
hitch rails strategically placed in diffrent spots outside the building and
water hydranats also placed outside. I would have one specific area
outside open to the sun for a wash area.

Meredith Clark
Dec. 19, 2009, 12:08 AM
My Father's firm had done a bunch of custom racing barns and they are just amazing! Money is usually not even an issue and besides being very efficient (since they have so many horses to work and care for in the morning) they are really pro-active in horse health.

The trainers were super concerned about ventilation, stall and isle space, natural lighting and other health and safety issues.

This is a barn at Fair Hill Training Center that I adore (5th drawling on the left) and the one below it is where Barbaro was trained.

http://www.clarkdesigngrouparchitects.com/studio2.html#

And my favorite of my Dad's barns is Tapeta Farm (http://www.tapeta.com/).. even though the website gives credit to the Amish builders and not the Architects and Engineers that designed it!

I can't afford any of this stuff... I have a tiny little Amish run in/combo barn.. which I love :)

vita_impavida
Dec. 20, 2009, 06:21 PM
Thank you everyone for your input!! Ive been really working on my plans for a few months now, and am pretty sure I am where I want to be, but there were a few great ideas I had to add!

*Multiple outside tie posts and outside wash area - I actually have tie posts at the barn I board at now, and though I dont use them too much, pretty much everyone else does! So Its something I am going to add.

*I decided it would be MUCH better to have atleast one side with the over hang, so it directs the barn "hub" to a work/business area instead of the stalling area. So Im going to include that.

I want auto waters outside in the pastures. But prefer to have water buckets in each stall. This way I can monitor water intake. I had a mare who was notoriously awful at staying hydrated, so it was something I watched very closely. With that being said though, I definitely plan on water faucets above the buckets in the stalls, so no hoses!

If there is anything else you think of, please post! I cant wait to show you the plans!!!

Thank you again everyone!!

chai
Dec. 20, 2009, 06:34 PM
Oh, to have the luxury of designing my own barn! I'd like that more than designing a house.

14 x 14 stalls with an overhang that opened to individual paddocks, all with access to large pasture.
Southern exposure in winter to soak up the sun, east/west ventilation in the stalls to pick up those lovely westerlies in the summer.
A hydrant in the barn with water access at each stall.
A separate barn to hold bulk shavings and 10 tons of hay.
A magical genie to make horse manure disappear on its own.

danceronice
Dec. 20, 2009, 06:56 PM
One thing I am LOVING at the barn I'm boarding at now is that my horse's stall has a paddock off his stall--you can just open a door and he can come in or out. I would love to have that on every stall in a barn if possible.

Concrete or brick center aisle for ease of cleaning. Stalls...I might actually leave the floors dirt/clay, with mats over that, and use straw to bed.

Well-drained wash rack that does not require the horse step up or down to get in. With hot and cold running water.

Electrical outlets near each stall so I can run plug-in heated buckets like my new barn has. (I would say auto-waterers, but my old horse vastly preferred playing with the paddle on his to his apple toy and when the paddle snaps off stall floods are no fun at all. Especially in winter in Michigan.) Also convenient to cross-ties if I have plug-in clippers or the vet or farrier needs an outlet for some reason.

A heated, finished tack room with a microwave and mini-fridge (useful for food, drinks, and any meds that have to be kept cold), hot and cold running water, a couple benches to sit on for people (and the inevitable barn cats), a phone with a message board with emergency numbers, wall-mounted metal racks for saddles, pegs for bridles, open shelving for tools, supplies, and some big enough to keep blankets. Floor suitable for easy cleaning, even if you clean your tack in there.

A SEPARATE feed room, with plastic lock-tight bins for grain, a scale, and places to store feed pans and buckets. Shelves for keeping supplements, and a table for measuring them out. This should either be RIGHT by the main door or with a separate outside entrance, either of which should be wide enough to admit at least a small wheelbarrow or cart to make it easier to get loads of feed in and out. A laundry-tub style sink for here for cleaning feed pans, buckets, scoops, measuring stuff for sups, etc.

A heated bathroom.

dmalbone
Dec. 20, 2009, 11:29 PM
But prefer to have water buckets in each stall. This way I can monitor water intake.
I do believe that they make water intake monitors that you hook up to the automatic waterers if that would be an option.

dmalbone
Dec. 20, 2009, 11:30 PM
I'll add about the larger stalls too. Our two are 12x15 and it didn't sound that much bigger than the 10x12 they're in now, but they feel HUGE when I'm standing in them.

vita_impavida
Dec. 20, 2009, 11:46 PM
I do believe that they make water intake monitors that you hook up to the automatic waterers if that would be an option.

OOohhh! Maybe I should look into that more! I do like the sound of that, and honestly it makes sense to have the option available, for this very reason.

Thank you!!

CoolMeadows
Dec. 20, 2009, 11:52 PM
I designed my barn too and it was such a rush to see it appear! I have 14' by 14' stalls, dutch doors to the outside and in, thick stall mats (forget which brand but they're awesome), 12' full length overhangs on both sides, asphalt aisle, h/c washrack with heaters and built in tack cleaning area with deep sinks, heated feed room with h/c water and washer and dryer, open fronted "hay for the day/wheelbarrow/tool storage" area, and a huge tack room.

I had them include an asphalt pad of about 40' by 18' on the south end of the barn and added a spigot that attaches from the water line in the washrack so the temperature could be adjusted. On chilly fall and spring days, that pad catches all the sun and tacking up on it is really nice and the horses seem to like a warm shower in the sun on those days too. I also have a mini loft over the feed room where I toss bagged blankets for the summer and fans for the winter. I decided against auto waterers inside but have fabulous ones out in the fields. Nothing worse than taking a sledgehammer to 100 gallon troughs 12 times a day in the winter. The buckets in the barn rarely freeze though, and I like being able to adjust the water temperature when I refill.

The only things I'd change would be to add a bathroom and maybe change my interior dutch doors to sliders. I spent forever getting quotes on the barn and some were insane. I ended up going with a retired UPS driver who enjoyed building, and I finished it out (hardware, stall footing, insulating and some walls) myself. It ended up about 1/3 the price that some builders had quoted! Always worth it to shop around. ;)

vita_impavida
Dec. 20, 2009, 11:53 PM
Oh, to have the luxury of designing my own barn! I'd like that more than designing a house.

14 x 14 stalls with an overhang that opened to individual paddocks, all with access to large pasture.
Southern exposure in winter to soak up the sun, east/west ventilation in the stalls to pick up those lovely westerlies in the summer.
A hydrant in the barn with water access at each stall.
A separate barn to hold bulk shavings and 10 tons of hay.
A magical genie to make horse manure disappear on its own.

I hear you on the "Id rather design my barn, than my house!" Lol! Its exactly what I am doing. :winkgrin:

I plan on building a large "apartment" on the end of the barn, at the second story level. I dont have any kids, so there is no need to build a house just yet.

But my horses need a nice home, so we start there. :D

PS!! Tell your genie to send me a friend or cousin... :lol:

thanks for the ideas!!!

juanbadcat
Dec. 21, 2009, 09:36 AM
Don't forget the heated bathroom! We designed and built our own barn, hubby is an engineer/builder so he wired and plumbed everything. We have a 100' pole barn - 1/2 has 4 stalls and the other 1/2 is his 'man garage'. One main isle has a feed room, tack room, and heated bathroom, plus a door for the upstairs apt. Our run-in shed is attached to the back of the barn so it's got a huge overhang for nasty weather, and is filled with crushed stone to avoid mud, etc... It's easy to clean. We also have a gate to the run-in shed so the horses come into their stalls w/o any handling so if someone else is taking care of them, they just open the gate and the horses go to their stalls. We also have extra space for wood chips and hay inside the barn, although most of it is kept on the 'man' side. We have rubber mats in the stalls - 12 x 12 box stalls. Nothing freezes b/c the barn has foam insulation with hardiplank siding to keep bugs out. The 'wash stall' area is partly outside so the farrier drives up and handles the horses there, cement surface with natural lighting. The barn doors are cedar, like Mr Ed, and are covered by a glass dome for sunlight. I love it and so do the horses. I hope this helps. Good luck.

Sparky
Dec. 21, 2009, 02:47 PM
OOohhh! Maybe I should look into that more! I do like the sound of that, and honestly it makes sense to have the option available, for this very reason.

Thank you!!

You would like it until the day you walk in the barn, and sometime during the night, one of the horses just had to scratch their butt on the waterer, which broke and you now need a canoe to get down the aisle! But seriously, there are monitors and they work quite well.

equusvilla
Dec. 21, 2009, 02:52 PM
A FULL TIME GROOM!

vita_impavida
Dec. 22, 2009, 12:20 AM
You would like it until the day you walk in the barn, and sometime during the night, one of the horses just had to scratch their butt on the waterer, which broke and you now need a canoe to get down the aisle! But seriously, there are monitors and they work quite well.

Your post made me laugh, I had to share it with my family! :lol: Thank you. I have heard those horror stories, but was thinking IF I did the auto waterers in a corner I would have a "box" (something easy to swing aside) but to protect the fixture from... "Mr Horses" rear end, or whichever end they so chose to throw against it. :cool:

I had to enlarge my tack room by double already. :winkgrin:

SDHorses
Dec. 22, 2009, 02:12 AM
I just completed my beautiful new dream barn after losing my other two barns in the California wildfires in October, 2007. Although it has been a very difficult two years of waiting for permit approval, etc. it has given me the opportunity to fix what I did not like about my old barns.

First priority was selecting the best barn company: MD Barns to help design my new barn. We chose a raised center aisle (RCA) verses the older shedrow style. My new barn is now fully enclosed with a 16 foot aiselway and the stalls on either side. The stalls are mostly 12 x 16 plus one 12 x 20 for "the Princess Barbi" and one "floater wall that can be one 12 x 24 or two 12 x 12. What a neat feature to have a huge foaling stall or one for those larger horses. My tack room is 12 x 24 with tongue and groove throughout and a drop ceiling, also T & G complete with wood beams - very cool! I also have hot and cold water and a washer/dryer in my tack room.

There is a storage area in the attic of the barn which is not huge, but is great for storing trunks, etc. My office consists of a full kitchen with cabinets, sink, hot/cold water, peep window into one of the adjoining stalls, and a nice large lounge area with flat screen TV. We also have a 12 x 12 bathroom with shower, toilet, sink, etc. There is a separate feed room for grain, etc. that is 12 x 12 with sink, countertop that is 12 feet long, hot/cold water, etc. - love this room!

The front porch area is 30 x 40 feet and is fully enclosed with all tongue and groove walls complete with wall sconces and chandelier. This area is probably the best part of my barn!! :)

All of the stall fronts are tongue and groove wood with sliding door and either dutch doors in the back or sliding doors (every stall has a door at the front and the back for safety reasons). Three of the 12 x 16 stalls have grillwork for the entire fronts for mares and babies (will help to keep them cool in the summertime). Each stall has it's own attached paddock so the horses can go out at will, or can be locked in if the weather is bad. The back doors are half grill, with a sliding shutter to keep out the wind and rain or can be left open to allow for ventilation - I especially LOVE this feature.

Each stall has automatic waterers, an extra tall hay rack for my big horses (no more grabing the top of the flake of hay and tossing it on the floor) and extra large feed pan. All stalls have industrial "daylight" lighting with an on/off switch at each stall along with a double outlet plug (for use when clipping a horse in their stall, etc.).

The center aiseway has 6 industrial ceiling fans with remote controls and forward/reverse switch, plus 8 ceiling lights down the aisleway - these give off tremendous light but use basically no power! The wash rack has both hot and cold water and is separated by a half wall. We have added sliding windows with screens at the RCA which can be opened to allow more ventilation, or closed to keep the entire barn toasty and to keep out embers in the event that we have another fire in our area.

All stalls and wash rack have Red Barn interlocking rubber mats. My barn aiseway and attached porch have concrete with rubber bricks over the top, so are very safe for the horses and very easy on their feet and legs.

We also added the air gates at the three openings in the event that one of the horses breaks out, they cannot get out of the barn, yet we can keep the sliding doors open. The long side of the barn has 10 foot high sliding doors to allow for hay deliveries right into the barn/feed room - really nice!

The entire barn has seamless rain gutters that do not leak - this was a biggy for us.

Overall, I would do nothing different as I love this new barn! I can't wait to bring the horses home this weekend to see their new luxury accomodations!! I hope they are as excited as I am....

ponygirl
Dec. 22, 2009, 09:11 AM
Your post made me laugh, I had to share it with my family! :lol: Thank you. I have heard those horror stories, but was thinking IF I did the auto waterers in a corner I would have a "box" (something easy to swing aside) but to protect the fixture from... "Mr Horses" rear end, or whichever end they so chose to throw against it. :cool:

I had to enlarge my tack room by double already. :winkgrin:

Or just put them lower than butt level like I did :)

ponygirl
Dec. 22, 2009, 09:13 AM
I just completed my beautiful new dream barn after losing my other two barns in the California wildfires in October, 2007. Although it has been a very difficult two years of waiting for permit approval, etc. it has given me the opportunity to fix what I did not like about my old barns.

First priority was selecting the best barn company: MD Barns to help design my new barn. We chose a raised center aisle (RCA) verses the older shedrow style. My new barn is now fully enclosed with a 16 foot aiselway and the stalls on either side. The stalls are mostly 12 x 16 plus one 12 x 20 for "the Princess Barbi" and one "floater wall that can be one 12 x 24 or two 12 x 12. What a neat feature to have a huge foaling stall or one for those larger horses. My tack room is 12 x 24 with tongue and groove throughout and a drop ceiling, also T & G complete with wood beams - very cool! I also have hot and cold water and a washer/dryer in my tack room.

There is a storage area in the attic of the barn which is not huge, but is great for storing trunks, etc. My office consists of a full kitchen with cabinets, sink, hot/cold water, peep window into one of the adjoining stalls, and a nice large lounge area with flat screen TV. We also have a 12 x 12 bathroom with shower, toilet, sink, etc. There is a separate feed room for grain, etc. that is 12 x 12 with sink, countertop that is 12 feet long, hot/cold water, etc. - love this room!

The front porch area is 30 x 40 feet and is fully enclosed with all tongue and groove walls complete with wall sconces and chandelier. This area is probably the best part of my barn!! :)

All of the stall fronts are tongue and groove wood with sliding door and either dutch doors in the back or sliding doors (every stall has a door at the front and the back for safety reasons). Three of the 12 x 16 stalls have grillwork for the entire fronts for mares and babies (will help to keep them cool in the summertime). Each stall has it's own attached paddock so the horses can go out at will, or can be locked in if the weather is bad. The back doors are half grill, with a sliding shutter to keep out the wind and rain or can be left open to allow for ventilation - I especially LOVE this feature.

Each stall has automatic waterers, an extra tall hay rack for my big horses (no more grabing the top of the flake of hay and tossing it on the floor) and extra large feed pan. All stalls have industrial "daylight" lighting with an on/off switch at each stall along with a double outlet plug (for use when clipping a horse in their stall, etc.).

The center aiseway has 6 industrial ceiling fans with remote controls and forward/reverse switch, plus 8 ceiling lights down the aisleway - these give off tremendous light but use basically no power! The wash rack has both hot and cold water and is separated by a half wall. We have added sliding windows with screens at the RCA which can be opened to allow more ventilation, or closed to keep the entire barn toasty and to keep out embers in the event that we have another fire in our area.

All stalls and wash rack have Red Barn interlocking rubber mats. My barn aiseway and attached porch have concrete with rubber bricks over the top, so are very safe for the horses and very easy on their feet and legs.

We also added the air gates at the three openings in the event that one of the horses breaks out, they cannot get out of the barn, yet we can keep the sliding doors open. The long side of the barn has 10 foot high sliding doors to allow for hay deliveries right into the barn/feed room - really nice!

The entire barn has seamless rain gutters that do not leak - this was a biggy for us.

Overall, I would do nothing different as I love this new barn! I can't wait to bring the horses home this weekend to see their new luxury accomodations!! I hope they are as excited as I am....


Pictures???? :)

cajunbelle
Dec. 22, 2009, 09:16 AM
A magical genie to make horse manure disappear on its own.

I am all thumbs up... for this one!

equusvilla
Dec. 22, 2009, 09:33 AM
I'll add about the larger stalls too. Our two are 12x15 and it didn't sound that much bigger than the 10x12 they're in now, but they feel HUGE when I'm standing in them.

Don't you mean that they feel HUGE when you have to CLEAN them...snicker snicker!!!

dmalbone
Dec. 22, 2009, 11:44 AM
Don't you mean that they feel HUGE when you have to CLEAN them...snicker snicker!!!

LOL, haven't had to clean them yet since he's not yet home. He is USUALLY a neat stall keeper (pee in one spot and heaven forbid he poop outside of his corner!!!). Who knows... maybe it was because of the smaller space and now since he'll have more room to get away from it he won't be so courteous. :lol:

kypeep
Dec. 22, 2009, 12:00 PM
I've found that even messier horses generally choose a "bathroom spot" in bigger stalls. Therefore, I would opt for the biggest stalls I could afford. Our horses are stabled in an old barn, and the stalls have odd dimensions - 11 wide X 19 long. All the horses do their business in a corner or on one side of the stall. They rarely walk back through their manure, which makes for much quicker cleaning.

tle
Dec. 22, 2009, 12:07 PM
Great thread! The property we're looking at buying doesn't really have a suitable horse barn, so I've been playing at designing one lately. Even already have 1 estimate on the exterior (basic pole barn). Having a LOT of fun doing it and plan to include (I hope) the following at one point or another:

12x12 stalls for the most part, although might have 1 bigger/1 smaller to accommodate individual horses (hubby's will be bigger I'm sure while the kids will be smaller). Slider doors for aisle access, dutch doors with some kind of plexiglass window for exterior access (I want the light but also want the door). Buckets for water (I'm not sold on auto waterers but might change my mind before it's all built). Individual GFCI outlet at each stall. LIght might be shared between 2 stalls.

Feed room big enough to have a small countertop and store several days of hay with main hay storage in a separate building. Feed room will have both an internal sliding door and external double doors for easy unloading.

12' overhangs on each side. All but 1 stall can possibly have an individual paddock access if it ends up in the location that I'm thinking of... but will have to get on the land to see for sure.

Insulated tack room with both an interior door opening to the main aisle and an exterior door. Tack room is situated in the middle of the barn so the exterior door will make trailer loading and unloading easier. Tack room is also on the side facing the house. Include a microwave and mini-fridge, and a window.

heated bathroom with washer/dryer and hot water heater. Bathroom like the tack room will have both an interior and exterior door for easy access.

12x12 washrack/grooming area with 1 side wall being cabinets with a double basin deep sink. Rubber matted floor that is inset (lower than the main aisle by a couple inches) with a drain at the back of the stall (exterior wall). UV heat lamp above the area, which is set fairly close to the main entrance for ease of use for farriers and vets. Includes GFCI/waterproof outlets on each side wall as well as at least 1 220v outlet closeby.

Overhead loft storage over the bathroom/tool storage and tack room on one side only. Open over stalls. Possibly anotehr overhead area over the feed room, but not 100% sold on this.

Haven't yet decided on half wall with bars/mesh or just half wall stalls period. May depend on the horse's personalities.

Center aisle, tack room and tool storage/bathroom areas are brushed concrete floor. Stalls are leveled crushed rock with mats.

Have contemplated a couple ceiling fans to keep air moving as well as 2 cupolas. end doors will be split sliding doors. Aisle way a minimum of 12' wide.

Outside I would love individual paddocks that can open to the track system. The more I read about a Paddock Paradise system the more I like it (with a few of the more "extreme" ideas being tossed out). I'd rather have that than 2-3 bigger pastures, but ideally I'd be able to use the interior of a track AS a pasture so the best of both I guess.

REALLY looking forward to seeing this come into being.

mvp
Dec. 22, 2009, 12:55 PM
Just to add one more thing not yet listed:

An official laundromat/industrial strength double-loader washer and comparable dryer in the barn. These are the only way to wash horse blankets, IMO.

Having dealt with water and hoses in the Northeast, heated Nelson waters in paddocks would be near the top of the list.

Long stalls-- even 10 x 16 do work well for messy horses.

Oh, and a big gravel/rock fund for redoing the area around paddock gates as often as needed.

One more thing: On a farm with run-ins for large pastures, a storage section in these with a door to the outside so that hay can be delivered there en masse, rather than carried from the barn at each meal.

Trevelyan96
Dec. 22, 2009, 01:32 PM
Also, IF I do the over hang, what kind of base/floor would you suggest. I wanted concrete... but have you seen the cost of concrete!? :D So then, we were talking about a compact stone, but stone... and horse-shoes dont get along. Any suggestions would be totally appreciated.

If you want concrete, you can do it the way my DH did. I love his engineering mind. He used pressure treated 2x4 to section of a roughly 4x6 area, bought a small concrete mixer from Harbor Freight for around $300 and then leveled the sections and poured the concrete as he went along, so he could do a section a day, when he had time, without us losing access to the entire barn or overhang area. My entire 34 x 36 barn, and the 36 x 12 area in front of the barn, which is the overhang plus a wash area, is completely done in concrete for about 1/4 of the cost.

vita_impavida
Dec. 22, 2009, 05:19 PM
If you want concrete, you can do it the way my DH did. I love his engineering mind. He used pressure treated 2x4 to section of a roughly 4x6 area, bought a small concrete mixer from Harbor Freight for around $300 and then leveled the sections and poured the concrete as he went along, so he could do a section a day, when he had time, without us losing access to the entire barn or overhang area. My entire 34 x 36 barn, and the 36 x 12 area in front of the barn, which is the overhang plus a wash area, is completely done in concrete for about 1/4 of the cost.

OOOhhh. You know, for some reason, I hadnt thought of this, but very very smart. Thank you!! :)

katarine
Dec. 22, 2009, 09:32 PM
well...I did, but I did it on a Bev nap over too many glasses of wine and my DH built it...overall it's too tall, too airy, and too redneck and low rent to mention... but it's paid for, and mine.

;)

sixpockets
Dec. 23, 2009, 12:11 AM
Right now, my barn is fairly ideal for my two horses. We have two stalls on each side of a tack room. The stalls are 20x20, same as the tack room. Then there is an overhang of about 15' over, it gives the horses something to get under if they want.
I like not having to lock them in stalls to make sure they are dry and warm if they need.
We are in the process of redoing the barn though, its an older barn that was not taken care of by the previous owners. I'm going to have the overhang redone, along with new roofing, and the stalls are going to have new doors. Its going to be a fun summer project, along with opening up another 7 acres for them to play.