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wsmoak
Dec. 12, 2009, 11:12 AM
We are house hunting north of Columbus GA, and it looks like I get to build a barn! Very few of the properties we're looking at already have one.

The two barns I've really enjoyed were U-shaped shedrow barns with the stalls facing inward, large overhangs, and a courtyard in the center.

I'm coming from Phoenix where we get maybe 10" of annual rainfall. Columbus easily gets five times that, and is heading for a record of over 70" this year.

Will I regret not building a "normal" barn in a much wetter climate? I'm thinking that even with the rain, there will be more hot and humid days where I want shade and *air* than there will be cold and rainy days where I'd want to be inside.

This is a backyard barn, I'm only planning on 3-4 horses. And as it's just a hobby, I don't *have* to work with them in nasty weather.

Any advice on barns in the SW Georgia climate, and pictures of your shedrow barns are appreciated!

Bluey
Dec. 12, 2009, 11:30 AM
There is a poster from NC, I think, that has posted pictures of her shedrow barn that she is very happy with.

We used to have one for our race horse training barn, but I really think that a roof over our heads is a more sensible solution to being out of the weather.
You can make a roofed barn just as airy as you want to make it, shedrow barns don't have any advantage on that.

Here is our old 22 stall shed row barn, that had four sides with a courtyard in the middle:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/Scan050March272007.jpg?t=1260635153

To me, it was a fire trap, as they only made one entrance on one corner and the six back stalls had exits to runs.

Sillymoose
Dec. 12, 2009, 12:13 PM
Lucky! Where are you looking? We looked at nice property out near Waverly Hall about a year ago that already had a great barn and on 30 acres, so there are some nice places out there. I'm sure you'll find something great.

The Midland Foxhounds right outside of Columbus has the shedrow type barn. It's been a while since I've been there and I don't have any pics but maybe you can get in touch with someone over there or go and check out how it works for them. That way you can see how it works for someone who deals with the same conditions you'll be dealing with.

I know for me it was wonderful to have a fully roofed barn. The rain we've gotten this year is ridiculous. In fact its raining right now and we were only able to drop feed this morning because our horses are no longer in the roofed barn. Most people in this area have the fully roofed barn but I have always loved the shedrow style and I'm sure you could make it work for you, especially if you have a really large overhang.

I think if you just focus on the summer climate you should be fine. Open and airy is a must. Also take into consideration that we frequently have severe weather, this includes tornadoes, so having solid shelter is necessary. And especially this year, heavy flooding rain is typical. Luckily the water drains very quickly out here so we don't deal with the mud like I have in Idaho but while it's raining it can be quite crazy and you definitely need good drainage. But for the most part it's a pretty mild climate and really easy as far as horsekeeping goes, so you shouldn't have any problem having the type of barn you want.

wsmoak
Dec. 12, 2009, 12:30 PM
Decisions, decisions... I forgot to include a picture of the look I'm imagining:

http://www.horizonstructures.com/l-shaped-barns.asp

(Though I'll start with a pole barn structure, it's easier to re-purpose as something else if we need to sell and the new owners don't have horses.)

We're looking around Hamilton, Waverly Hall, Shiloh, and over as far as Geneva, GA. There are some beautiful pieces of land, but unfortunately we're having trouble finding something with nice pasture _and_ a house we like.

Sillymoose
Dec. 12, 2009, 01:44 PM
I really really like that. I bet that would work great around here. That overhang is great and makes it possible to still muck and groom on those stormy days. Although from that model I would make sure mine had bigger windows or dutch doors on the back for even better ventilation. Hamilton and Waverly Hall are awesome. I would love property up there but it's getting so darn expensive.

BasqueMom
Dec. 12, 2009, 01:53 PM
Nice barn!

We have a shedrow with overhang--three stalls, double stall sized tackroom that is enclosed. However, the stalls have grill fronts so no way to keep the horses out of the wind or yourself if the wind is out of the east. While Texas doesn't get as cold as Colorado where we used to live, it's a damp and cutting cold. The wind tends to howl for days and taking care of the boys can get pretty miserable.

In other words, I'd kill for a barn with a center aisle where we could get out of the wind, work with the horses (brushing, etc) out of the wind or rain, not have to tromp through the mud to get to the stalls to feed, etc. An overhang over the stalls would be a must--ours have 24/7 turnout with access to their stalls.
They use their overhang to get out of the rain and out of the sun.

ayrabz
Dec. 12, 2009, 04:49 PM
Well, not in GA, but in VA...close enough?
:D
I ended up converting an 'outbuilding' for now...but even before making that decision, I knew a 'shedrow' style was what would fit best, and what I wanted---however---my chosen style was to have the equally deep 'overhang' 'enclosed'.....so that: in the summer, the doors into the "aisle" (each end, if best, or only one end) could remain open for airflow, but in the winter, they could be closed to keep out the elements.
So you'd basically have a shedrow that the 'overhang is totally enclosed, doors on both ends to open for summer, close for winter. I like a design that would have full end walls (with the larger doors) but would have a half wall on the long side of the 'aisle' with windows above for ventillation in summer, and for light/viewing out (into the adjoining arena?) in winter.
Just 'MY' dream barn! :o)

scpezold
Dec. 12, 2009, 04:59 PM
Hey wsmoak! So great to know the move is still a go!! As you know, I live in Columbus and am in the process of building a barn.

Although I LOVE the look of the shedrow/courtyard and really, really considered it I just knew long term I would be happier with a CAB.

A few reasons:
*Weather around here (and I am sure everywhere) can come in from all directions making a shedrow hard to "mask" from driving rain/wind.

*I know we are in the South but it can get pretty cold here (for us Southerners). For instance as we speak it is around 38 but it feels like 30. It is windy and raining now and has done some sleeting. I am constantly watching which way rain and wind move and it just varies by storm.

*A few barns around here have invested in heating elements to go in the wash stalls so they can bathe in the colder weather. So much more toasty bathing inside a CAB especially if insulated which leads me to my next reason.

*Although possible, it will be harder to insulate and get full benefits (warmer in winter, cooler in summer) with a courtyard/shedrow type.
It also does get pretty darn hot here in the summer but insulating a CAB easily drops the temp by at least 10 degrees (depending on how insulated and to what extent).

*One great "amenity" of the south is the mosquitoes, gnats, bugs, etc during the summer. Considering we usually dont have a Spring here (it usually goes from very cold to hot, miserable, muggy) the flying bugs are apparent from March to October and sometimes November or December. Therefore, integrated into my barn plans will be very large screen doors at either ends of the barn aisle. This way I can leave the aisle doors open, have the breeze (whether natural or by artificial means) and still have a relatively reduced fly problem. My guys like to be in during this time and flies they dont constantly have to swat will make them so much more content. Alot harder to escape the bugs with a shedrow.

*I am a chicken when it comes to cold weather. Even more so when it is cold AND raining. Cant stand it. Barn chores for me are so much more pleasurable when I am completely absent from the outside elements. I often have to take many layers off when I am working. Harder to do if you are cleaning stalls with rain coming in sideways in a shedrow.

I am not discouraging the shedrow as I think they are so classic but I do want to give you some things to consider so you can make the very best decision. Most importantly it has to work for YOU.

My old trainer has just been hired as the trainer out at Midland Foxhounds. Her place before was a CAB and yes Midland is courtyard. I can put you in touch with her if interested. She cannot stand the cold and is very hot natured like me. Midland does have some washstalls that are pointed inwards (IOW they would be facing the side of one stall) at one of the ends of the courtyard. Not sure how that works out. However, most of the time tacking is done outside in the courtyard area. I will try to see if I can find some pics to post. It is very classic looking and is in the Tudor style.
I know another barn has recently been built on the Hardaway property and I do believe it is a CAB. It is not visible from this barn and I have not seen it yet.

Either way, please feel free to PM me should you have questions. I have thought about this barn building process for years and have lived in Columbus since '83 so I know the climate well.

suz
Dec. 12, 2009, 08:29 PM
that's my favorite style of barn!
i have a three sided one with courtyard planned for our land someday. i'm thinking of four stalls on each of the three sides, which gives me plenty of room for four horses and the chickens and goats. plus tack, shavings, tractor, etc.
dh thinks we should cover the courtyard with trusses and a steel roof. i'm all for it if we can afford it, and think we may even install a water fountain in the center of it. something functional like a nelson waterer, but old fashioned looking like a stone fountain--our neighbor is a stone mason, and our land is full of rock, so we may be able to pull it off relatively inexpensively.
of course the opening will face the south, in this new england climate it will be a great place for the critters to spend their days in lousy weather.

AKB
Dec. 12, 2009, 10:50 PM
I would be concerned that the Horizon barn in your pictures might not be tall enough. In the summer, it is nice to have a high roof to help keep the barn cool.

We built a barn at the house we had in SW VA when a daughter was in school there with her 2 horses. Her barn was 36x24. There are 3, 12x12 stalls with a 12x36 aisle in front of them. The builder convinced us to close in the aisle rather than leaving it open as a shedrow. The large barn doors on the ends of the aisle can be left open, so the horses can use the aisle as a run in shed.

The builder was right to advise us to close in the front of the aisle. Whenever there was unexpected driving rain or wind, we were happy that the horses had good shelter in the aisle. The stalls stayed nice and cool in the summer time because they were always shaded by the aisle. She used 1 stall as a feed room and for hay storage. Because the roof and walls were high, she could store quite a bit of hay there. The barn doors could be closed in bad weather so the farrier could work in the aisle despite bad storms.

dmalbone
Dec. 13, 2009, 02:51 AM
I live in Indiana, so nothing crazy dramatic as far as weather either way, but I would never want a shedrow. If it was that or nothing, sure.... but I couldn't begin to tell you how many times i was out in the barn and got stuck in a pop-up storm, wind blowing from bizarre directions, hail, etc. (of course usually the day the farrier's supposed to be there, or there's a sick horse and you NEED to be out there). A lot of peoples' "shedrow" barns are really simple center aisle barns with aisle wide sliders. If you have two sliders at the end of each aisle and dutch doors on all of the stalls (which I would always do for safety anyway) then you get the best of both worlds.

nadasy
Dec. 13, 2009, 06:41 AM
Here is a photo of my place when I lived in MD. It's now owned by my friends-they always joked they were going to live there, and that was 5 or 6 years BEFORE. We had NO idea they'd eventually own it. Funny how stuff happens.......

http://photos.imageevent.com/nadasy43/bbphotos/website%20photos%20177.jpg

I live near Buffalo now, and this design wouldn't do well here. In all the years I lived in MD, we only had one bruiser of a storm where the snow was about 6" below the top of the bottom door. That involved HOURS of shoveling to get the horses out so they could make snow angels. :lol:

scpezold
Dec. 13, 2009, 09:21 AM
The builder convinced us to close in the aisle rather than leaving it open as a shedrow.

This is something I was thinking about after I posted as I was contemplating shedrow/courtyard type configuration before I settled on CAB. Great idea but I would take it a step further and put barn doors or roll up garage doors all the way around the front of the closed in aisle. This could be used in the summer and you could then close them up when weather was bad, winter and wanting to bathe, winter and farrier was coming, etc.
Very similar to this:
http://www.archerbuchanan.com/portfolio.asp?iSection=3&iPortfolio=24#

yellowbritches
Dec. 13, 2009, 05:39 PM
Darn it! I don't have any good pictures of the shedrow/courtyard barn we had for awhile (unfortunately, the land lady was UBER-crazy, otherwise, I'd still be there. I plot of ways to bring her down so I can buy the property and love it for always :lol:). This is the very best I can do, and unfortunately a very ratty looking 3 yr. old is taking up most of the picture :lol::lol: http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2417660710084009341vFeJqn?vhost=pets (the next picture is the after and it is looking OUT of the courtyard).

The barn was about 80 years old and unfortunately had wiring that was probably almost as old. It was built into the hill a bit, so the the three stalls at the back were very insolated. One of the "arms" was partially dug into the hill, too, so that made them pretty insolated as well.

All the stalls were quite open. They all had half doors but no top doors and the top half of the outside walls were actually slatted, drop down windows (we left them up...80 year old hardware, too). It sounds like it would be frigid, but the stalls were VERY toasty...we rarely had more than a little ice in the buckets (this barn was in Northern VA). They were very cool in the summer, too, and I don't think we ever felt like we needed fans. The barn was sited very well so that the winter wind did not whip into the courtyard and whirl around into all the stalls. It was protected enough that snow almost never made it into the open stalls, and the eaves hung over enough to almost always leave a path around by their doors. But it got cool breezes in the summer and had some big, old shade trees to help, too (only problem with those trees were that they were walnut and in the fall you often thought you'd all of a sudden ended up in Bagdad when the walnuts would pummel the tin roof!!).

The biggest issues to look out for from building one from the ground up (instead of having to deal with 80 year old issues):

Site the barn right. You really want to make sure it is sheltered in the winter but, more importantly in the GA summer, that cooling breezes can move around the barn and into the stalls.
Be smart about water placement. Our one and only hose was at the end of one of the arms, which meant having LOTS of hose to drag around. Keep water in the middle if you can, or have it in more than one spot.
While tacking up wasn't an issue (the stalls worked fine for us), batheing and clipping were a big issue and there was no good spot for the farrier to work out of the elements. Plan for that! Whether you have a stall converted to a wash/grooming stall that the farrier can work in or what, give yourself and the farrier and vet a good spot to work around the horses with good lighting.
Our lighting sucked, but I think that was an 80 year barn issue and not a shedrow issue. That needs to be addressed properly no matter the barn style!
Realize that if someone breaks out at night, there will be no barn doors to keep them in the barn. I suggest having a way to close the horses into the yard when you are not there (our courtyard was only accesible from a gate, which we closed at night).
Don't forget to have adequate feed, hay, and tack storage (again, a no brainer no matter the barn!).I think you'll really like the style and they are great in places in the south. We actually rented an ADORABLE 4 stall shedrow in Aiken, SC one winter that was PERFECT. Well thought out, warm on the cool nights but cool on the warm days. And the horses love them because they get to see all the action, all the time! :yes:

fivehorses
Dec. 13, 2009, 06:15 PM
what is the concensus if building a shedrow barn to have the open side facing?

wsmoak
Dec. 13, 2009, 06:39 PM
One reason I like the shedrow style is that if they have to be kept in, the horses can see what's going on. And I can look out my window and see them.

I plan to have doors on the back leading to runs (which hopefully connect to pasture... I need my husband to be able to turn out without haltering and leading.)

Closing in the front is interesting, but kind of defeats the purpose! At that point, unless you're doing shedrow because of space limitations, you might as well put in the other row of stalls...

I do plan on having a grooming stall (thinking two stalls and tack room down one side, then grooming stall and two more stalls down the other. The third side to make the U would be later, if ever -- that's for the lounge and viewing area, so it depends on where the arena is in relation to the barn.)

A well lit space out of the elements for the farrier and vet is *definitely* in the plans. With only a few horses, I try to take good care of them so they'll keep me on the schedule!

Which way to orient the barn depends on the prevailing winds and where the nastiest weather comes from.

Thanks for all the ideas! Keep them coming, and I'll sure come back once we've actually bought something and lure a few of the Georgia contingent down to tromp around and figure out where things belong. :)

shawneeAcres
Dec. 13, 2009, 07:17 PM
Please take a look at what we built, this is our second barn of this layout, which I designed for HOT HUMID eastern NC weather, which I am sure is the same in Georgia! We had Carolina Carports put up the shell, 20 x 100' with an enclosed 20 x 10 feed room at one end. We then built the stalls ourselves, very cost effective and not hard to do, shell was up in two days!

http://good-times.webshots.com/album/569459911nWMeoO

wsmoak
Dec. 13, 2009, 07:27 PM
Please take a look at what we built, [...]http://good-times.webshots.com/album/569459911nWMeoO

Neat! The drop-down windows on the back side are clever. :yes:

We will do most of the construction ourselves. Otherwise, I will first have to pay the contractors extra to put up with "help" and then I will have to listen to years of complaining about how it was not done right. ;)

UKYeventer
Dec. 13, 2009, 08:34 PM
I am currently leasing a small farm in Lexington Ky that has a shed row barn. I absolutely love it! The barn has 3 10X14 stalls and a 10X14 tack room with a loft above. The thing I like most about it is how open the stalls are, one of my ponies has always hated being in a stall and would practically run you over to get out of her stall. Since moving her to this barn she loves to come inside and doesn't even mind being in the barn alone because she can still see her friends. The only thing I wish the barn had was a wash rack/grooming area under cover. There is a 10 foot over hang in front of the stalls that has come in handy when the farrier has been there while it was raining, but I still wish I had an actually cross tie area. The barn is cool on warm days and warm on cool days. The back of the barn is facing the way that most of the storms come in so that keeps the stalls from getting any rain or snow in them.

Here is a picture of my shed row barn:
http://pets.webshots.com/photo/2597149340105967166PXYtqj?vhost=pets

mellsmom
Dec. 14, 2009, 09:10 AM
with a small overhang and tack and feed room.

The whole thing was about $12K.
http://www.facebook.com/home.php?ref=home#/photo.php?pid=2085129&id=836019043

It's bascially 12 x 48 with three stalls. Two on one end and to teh far left is the last stall/run in. I was going to enclose it, but it is great for situations like.... farrier..... equine dentist, etc.
All my stalls have dutch doors that open off the back. I have a nice 5 1/2 foot overhang out front. I should have gotten a 10 or 12 foot over hang, but live and learn.
We have had 11 -12 inches of rain in the last 40 days. I am up to my ankles in mud at the barn....mainly because the TB does not want to get wet ever and hates mud...so he mills around the barn 24/7. I missed my chance to have stone dust added during the last dry out...before Thanksgiving!

philosoraptor
Dec. 15, 2009, 08:58 PM
I have a shedrow. I love it. Do be sure you have it graded well, if you have any sort of mud problems.

You can have overhangs put on a shedrow, if you wish.

I liked mine because brand new I paid $7,500 (3 stalls + tiny tackroom; this is 3 yrs ago). Compared to the 3 stall polebarn quotes I was getting of $20,000 - $35,000, I am so happy I did the shedrow.

Blume Farm
Dec. 15, 2009, 09:54 PM
Below is a picture of my barn that I had built when I lived in Southern Fl. It worked perfect for warm weather environment. It was a "modified" shedrow barn, had 4 stalls, cement covered "aisle", and tack/ feed closet.

It was essentially "L" shaped with two stalls: on the left 12X12 (can't see them in this picture), you can see the door to the tack closet, one 12x12 stall next to the tack closet, and the last stall to the right was a foaling stall 12X24. I hung cross ties in the covered "open aisle" area that worked perfect for grooming, farrier, vet, etc. There was a "center aisle" area between stall 1 and the tack closet that was great when weather was not so great. Each stall had doors on the back that opened to paddocks as well as doors (just simple panel gates) that opened into the barn area. The aisle area between stall 1 and the tack closet had a gate that opened to the back paddocks so I could simply just walk out the back without going through a stall. I tried to make a "floor plan" below to try to explain it better (sorry, when I hit post it somehow skewed my drawing so not very clear at all!!). It was a perfect little functional barn. The only thing would you may be needing a bigger tack area. In Fl I wanted it small as it was only my stuff and due to heat/ mold I never kept more than 1 weeks worth of hay/ grain and that fit fine in the tack closet with my stuff.

http://www.blumefarm.com/aroundthefarm.html

________ _________________________
| stall 1 | |tack | stall3 | stall4 |
| |aisle | closet | | |
________ ________|________ |
|stall 2 | | |
| | open aisle | |
________ ________|

Bluey
Dec. 16, 2009, 07:15 AM
Those wanting to build a barn should think that it is not always pretty weather and you are out in the elements in shedrow barns.
I think the most sensible barn is an aisle and stalls on both sides.
You can use the North side for stalls, storage, tackrooms, etc. but you have considerably more protection from the elements in such a barn.

You can make a covered barn just as open as a shedrow, the horses can still look all around and out the now back doors and they can come and go into their stalls if you have them open to runs, pens or pastures.
All the way around that is a better model.

For about the same price for the area covered by each type of barn, you are really covering the area, not leaving most of it exposed to the weather as in a shed row barn.

You can make any type barn work fine, many keep horses in converted garages, but if you are building a horse barn today, the most sensible use of materials for the protection you get is not a shedrow, but a covered barn.
Anyone that tells you different is not remembering the many days they are partially out in the rain/snow in their shedrows and wishing they had a covered barn.

When we had our shedrow barn, we hung tarps on the front to keep the rain and snow from blowing into the covered area in front of the stalls and in the back stalls into the stalls themselves.

Are shedrow barns very pretty and work fine for many?
Of course, courtyard barns is what many had in Europe for centuries.

I consider shedrow barns workable, but a second best to a covered barn, when it comes to having a barn that gives you protection from the elements, which is the idea of a barn anyway and I have worked in all kinds of barns and even stables without barns.

katarine
Dec. 16, 2009, 10:33 AM
Pluses of my shedrow:

built tall so it's easy to put hay in the loft, backing the trailer right up to the edge of the loft floor

airy

light

minuses:

airy-ours faces east so normal weather hits the west side/the back of the barn- but swirling nasty rain? makes for a wet hall and nowhere dry to be. Also NO morning shade in the summer- after noon it's shady but at10 AM saddling a horse ten feet from the core of the sun in July? I hate it.

light- well, hard to light it well b/c it only has 'one side'-


I wish I'd gone with a center aisle barn with a huge aisle and as high a ceiling as I could afford- breezy, shady, cooler in summer. Protected in weather. I don't have a 'spot', it seems like, where we can flop in chairs at the end of a good day, dirty, stinky, drinking a cold beer and talking about dogs and football and yes, horses. A hall would have provided that :)

lorilu
Dec. 16, 2009, 02:46 PM
I'm from Florida - hot and rainy inthe summertime, cold windy fronts during the winter.
I do not think a shed row or courtyard is the best choice.
Shedrows do not offer enough protection when the wind blows - whether cold or rain.

Courtyards become giant puddles when the rain runs off the roofs, and since you want to capture any available breeze, which way will you face it? Each side of the courtyard has the same "exposure" problems that a shed row does.

I have a center aisle barn and I love it. Breeze comes across the barn in the summer thru the open stall windows, and in the winter I (will be able to when i intall them) close the "barn doors" to prevent wind whistling down the aisle. Great when it rains - I can do anything inside, never get wet.

L

ponygirl
Dec. 17, 2009, 09:26 AM
mine: http://www.flickr.com/photos/94098385@N00/3558950939/

I live on the east coast of Florida, 1 mile from the river, 5 from the ocean. This barn has withstood 3 major hurricanes. It is very, very cool in the summer and I have no issue with not being able to get out of the elements. A lot of barn design is also placement of the barn.

shawneeAcres
Dec. 17, 2009, 10:03 AM
well I disagree about center aisle barns, having had several center aisle barns in hot humid NC that had NO ventilation and were hot boxes in summer time. However, the two shedrows I have built at current farm and last farm are ALWAYS cool with total ventilation. I do have drop down windows on backs of stalls which afford protection when I need to put them up, due to rain or wind. The overhang in front protects the stalls/horses just fine. In this area heat is much more devastating than cold and I wouldn't trade my barn for a center aisle!!

ponygirl
Dec. 17, 2009, 10:11 AM
well I disagree about center aisle barns, having had several center aisle barns in hot humid NC that had NO ventilation and were hot boxes in summer time. However, the two shedrows I have built at current farm and last farm are ALWAYS cool with total ventilation. I do have drop down windows on backs of stalls which afford protection when I need to put them up, due to rain or wind. The overhang in front protects the stalls/horses just fine. In this area heat is much more devastating than cold and I wouldn't trade my barn for a center aisle!!

I will agree with you about center aisle as my experience in my immediate area is the same as yours. A friend down the street has one. She also has a shedrow. The center aisle is stifling hot and stagnant in terms of air flow. It's also rather dark. Her shedrow- much cooler and airy with no fans. Now during a hurricane it's nicer in the center aisle as it can be closed up but no, I built a shedrow due to having boarded center aisles in our area for years.

lorilu
Dec. 17, 2009, 10:36 AM
Well, I guess the air issue for CA barns comes down to ceiling height and the type of stall front you have. My barn is sited so the wind comes across it in the summer - through the open stall windows, then across the aisle, and out the other side. The stall dividers are about 8' - not quite as high as the sliding doors. The front of the stall is 4/ of wood panel and bars above - not wood alll the way up. I do not have a hay loft, so it's open all the way up. The roof has a roof vent. Some I have seen have big gabel end fans in the gabel wall - or electric ventilators on top, or the regular heat driven ones.... Of course, fans on in the summer, but that's a fact of life here in any barn.

I am also under some shade trees - vital.

My barn is wood, but I board one horse at a cement CA barn. It is always cool in the summer, because the cement seems to stay cool.

dmalbone
Dec. 17, 2009, 10:53 AM
About center aisles... I see people bashing them, but MANY shedrows are solid along the whole backside and open on the front. I would venture to say that is the standard shedrow as opposed to a carport contraption that's open all around. The proper center aisle with dutch doors leading outside the stalls offers more airflow than the shedrow. True, many people don't have dutch doors going outside, but I got the impression that those talking about center aisles were talking about those with dutch doors. You basically would have two shedrows separated by a covered aisle. You put two doors on the end and you end up with exactly that... two shedrows with open fronts and backs with an aisle in between. Those who do not like center aisles- they need to be oriented to take advantage of that center aisle. Chances are it was positioned poorly. Or else they didn't have dutch doors to outside- that's a safety hazard and more people are including them now- if you were building your own barn and debating between a shedrow and a center aisle, obviously you would have them.

ponygirl
Dec. 17, 2009, 11:33 AM
About center aisles... I see people bashing them, but MANY shedrows are solid along the whole backside and open on the front. I would venture to say that is the standard shedrow as opposed to a carport contraption that's open all around. The proper center aisle with dutch doors leading outside the stalls offers more airflow than the shedrow. True, many people don't have dutch doors going outside, but I got the impression that those talking about center aisles were talking about those with dutch doors. You basically would have two shedrows separated by a covered aisle. You put two doors on the end and you end up with exactly that... two shedrows with open fronts and backs with an aisle in between. Those who do not like center aisles- they need to be oriented to take advantage of that center aisle. Chances are it was positioned poorly. Or else they didn't have dutch doors to outside- that's a safety hazard and more people are including them now- if you were building your own barn and debating between a shedrow and a center aisle, obviously you would have them.


I just don't care for 99% of the ones in my area. They do not have dutch doors out the back nor windows! The one center aisle I do like does have windows out the back and it's situated very well. I'd have her barn. My shedrow has windows on the back side so is very breezy. I can close them up as well. So maybe my shedrow is 1/2 a center aisle :D

Fairview Horse Center
Dec. 17, 2009, 12:13 PM
I worked at a barn with shedrows - I hated every minute of it both winter, and summer. Now I have a center aisle barn, and just LOVE it, although I have been in fancy, new center aisle barns that were hot summers, and cold winters.

The difference in my barn is that it is the old type barn with the high roof. That height is a great insulator, and my barns stay almost like air conditioning on a 100 degree day, yet water buckets don't freeze in the teens.

I hated the look of my "ugly old dairy barn" when I first got here, but quickly became a fan!

My barn does have large windows, so I can see what the horses are doing.

dmalbone
Dec. 17, 2009, 02:41 PM
I worked at a barn with shedrows - I hated every minute of it both winter, and summer. Now I have a center aisle barn, and just LOVE it, although I have been in fancy, new center aisle barns that were hot summers, and cold winters.

The difference in my barn is that it is the old type barn with the high roof. That height is a great insulator, and my barns stay almost like air conditioning on a 100 degree day, yet water buckets don't freeze in the teens.

I hated the look of my "ugly old dairy barn" when I first got here, but quickly became a fan!

My barn does have large windows, so I can see what the horses are doing.

Hey... off topic, but could you tell me how tall your stall walls are and how tall the doors are? Ours will be open and just trying to get an idea of other peoples' heights. thanks!

alteringwego
Dec. 17, 2009, 03:08 PM
Trainer in the area has a shed row style barn: http://clearviewfarmlandrum.com/ but in the harsh weather she has heavy 'curtains' that drop down around the barn to offer protection from the winds/rain. Works great and very airy for the hot summers in SC.

IMHO though I'd much prefer a center aisle type barn.

Fairview Horse Center
Dec. 17, 2009, 03:18 PM
Our stall doors are about 4', front walls about 5', between stalls about 6'. My windows to the outside are about 4' off the ground, and are about 3'x3'

Lieslot
Dec. 17, 2009, 03:21 PM
Loving my Horizon Shedrow :). Only 3-stall, tackroom, washstall & grooming area. But I'm pretty happy with it.

-deleted-

Bluey
Dec. 17, 2009, 07:22 PM
http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2860333720103075107MnVnZI

That is a beautiful christmasy postcard picture.:cool:

shawneeAcres
Dec. 17, 2009, 07:43 PM
The way I built my shedrow, the ENTIRE upper half of the backwalls of the stalls have a "gridwork" of metal, with drop down windows (two) on each stall on outside. Front also are grill across entire front upper half of the walls. The side walls are wood with 1 inch space between the boards. This allows for complete air circulation PLUS the horses have almost a 360 view in summer when the drop down windows are open. Horses love it!

KrazyTBMare
Dec. 18, 2009, 01:17 PM
I lived in north Columbus as a child and go up once a year to Pine Mountain Valley where the rest of my family lives. If I had to move, Id love to move back there. So beautiful.

I have a shed row barn that was here when we bought the property (we had to build the house). While the general idea of it is nice and it works, there are things Id love to change about it.

One thing I will say, whatever you make your overhang, add 2 more feet! My current overhang is only 2' and when the rain starts, it blows in and covers my 10' aisle. My girlfriend has overhangs that are 4' and rarely has the same issue.

I *LOVE* ponygirl's barn (http://www.flickr.com/photos/94098385@N00/3558950939/) as it is similar to mine but has the things Id love to change.

Being in Florida, I like the shed row barns because they allow for so much air movement.

Heres an older pic of my barn... Ive closed in the last stall and extended it into the aisle way and enclosed the wash stall into a hay stall. Its still a work in progress as I add it to when I can afford it.

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/Barn/2007-06-09016.jpg

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/Barn/2007-06-09020.jpg

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/Barn/2007-06-09023.jpg

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/Barn/2008-04-24007.jpg

http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/Rex/MVI_7688002_0001.jpg

half way completed stall addition
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/Barn/2008-04-24006.jpg

you can kind of see how the stalls and the add on in the very far back left look behind Layla
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r186/krazytbmare1/IMG_0023.jpg

Fancy That
Dec. 18, 2009, 03:39 PM
mine: http://www.flickr.com/photos/94098385@N00/3558950939/

I live on the east coast of Florida, 1 mile from the river, 5 from the ocean. This barn has withstood 3 major hurricanes. It is very, very cool in the summer and I have no issue with not being able to get out of the elements. A lot of barn design is also placement of the barn.

PonyGirl - you have the exact shedrow that I dreamed of putting in at our place. I love that you have 12' covered aisles, the large overhang at the end for tractors (could be used for hay, too) and a nice tackroom at the other end.

I'm in CA with very mild weather and shedrows are great here. I think with the weather where the OP lives, I'd go with an open/airy style center-aisle or mare motel at least.

We didn't have enough room or money to get a real barn, so we have run-in stall shelters instead.

ponygirl
Dec. 18, 2009, 04:00 PM
PonyGirl - you have the exact shedrow that I dreamed of putting in at our place. I love that you have 12' covered aisles, the large overhang at the end for tractors (could be used for hay, too) and a nice tackroom at the other end.

I'm in CA with very mild weather and shedrows are great here. I think with the weather where the OP lives, I'd go with an open/airy style center-aisle or mare motel at least.

We didn't have enough room or money to get a real barn, so we have run-in stall shelters instead.

Thanks! We built it ourselves to hurricane standards due to living on the coast. I think "shedrow" style can be a lot of things and I wanted mine to have more of an aisle like a center aisle. The side porch was an add-on and yes you can store hay in it. It would be very easy to close in and we just might. Pole barn building is fairly simple as this was our first attempt. The things I've learned how to do I'd never of thought I'd be doing! :) We completely enclosed the tackroom, creating a ceiling so we use the ceiling as additional storage. My blankets and whatnot are up there.
I can tell you that where and how you position your barn is a huge factor as to how cool or hot it is.

ToiRider
Dec. 20, 2009, 11:30 AM
Any advice on barns in the SW Georgia climate, and pictures of your shedrow barns are appreciated!

I just stumbled across a picture of this barn you might like: http://www.precisionbarnbuilders.com/Pole_Barns_.php (scroll down to the last barn on the page). It was built for a woman in Toccoa, GA. I really like the deep overhangs.