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pintopiaffe
Dec. 11, 2009, 04:48 PM
Not a pretty topic... I know we talked about it some last year, but I can't get it to come up on a search.

When it's Like This out: COLD. Wikkid COLD.

I dress in layers. I am perfectly happy and warm in those layers... In fact, I try to remember if I get chilled inside the house--to just go OUT and do some chores!

But then I sweat.

A Lot.

I have two UnderArmour shirts that make me feel *more* clammy, though I think maybe skin is dryer.

I am poorer than a churchmouse at the moment, so can't buy much...

How do you manage it?

Logic tells me I should maybe under-dress a little, but my hands and feet get brutally painful if they get cold (like Reynauds ) and so I'm hesitant to underdress...

HELP?

mkevent
Dec. 11, 2009, 05:05 PM
Do all the layers wick? I've found that even wicking underwear makes a difference. Every layer I wear has wicking qualities. If I start getting hot, I'll start peeling off layers-especially the barn jacket. If it's chilly without the jacket, I'll don a vest-that seems to do the trick.

I buy most of my clothes at TJ Maxx, Marshalls or clearance at Sierra Trading Post. They tend to have good deals on activewear.

Have you tried ittybittykitties for the cold hands and feet?

kookicat
Dec. 11, 2009, 05:26 PM
Maybe less layers but really good gloves, boots and socks? :)

Leather
Dec. 11, 2009, 09:13 PM
I go from freezing to drenched in sweat in 2.9 seconds.

Because of this, I just bought some of REI's MTS long underwear. MTS stands for for "Moisture Transport System."

The tag says "REI's MTS fabrics put sweat in its place: off your skin. Engineered to boost comfort during high-aerobic activity, our MTS fabrics wick moisture and help you feel drier faster."

I got a long sleeved top and bottoms. They were $30 each, so not cheap but not horrible.

I will be wearing it this weekend, I will report back.

manyspots
Dec. 12, 2009, 08:23 AM
I agree that layers are the way to go....

What I wear when the temp drops below 30 includes:

Pair of ski pants - got these at Dick's for about $30. Perfect for over jeans, sweatpants, pajama pants, whatever you are wearing. I find that wearing these keeps my legs and core warm and I can get away with stripping layers. If I start out in a t-shirt, long sleeve, fleece vest and jacket I usually end up in the vest or the long sleeve because my bottom half is so warm. This actually reduces my sweating issues. Arms stay ventilated so I stay comfortable.

Carhartt/Wahls lined bibs - same as above but for zero degree temps.

My layers always consist of my fleece vest because sometimes its just enough OR I can pull it off to cool down.

Insulated boots - again, goes with my whole keep the bottom warm theory.

Not sure if everyone is like this, I just know if my top half is too warm I am miserable!!!! :lol:

LauraKY
Dec. 12, 2009, 08:29 AM
Wool socks, insulated boots, gloves and glove liners and most important, a hat. I've found with that combination, while I'm working, I can usually take off my outer jacket and stick with the turtleneck and fleece.

Rhyadawn
Dec. 12, 2009, 01:10 PM
Wool socks, insulated boots, gloves and glove liners and most important, a hat. I've found with that combination, while I'm working, I can usually take off my outer jacket and stick with the turtleneck and fleece.

:yes:

Keep your feet and hands warm, but dress down the rest

Chall
Dec. 12, 2009, 03:12 PM
If the sweating is under your arms only, dry a paper towels folded up under your arm. That way you can throw it away after its used. A very good deodorant is "The Rock", its a stick and it lasts for months and months and months.

pooh
Dec. 13, 2009, 02:36 PM
I have that problem!! If I'm not moving around enough I freeze, but then I get riding and start sweating. So --- I dress in layers, usually a cotton or silk type turtleneck, then a sweateshirt - preferably zip so I can remove it if needed. When grooming, slower miving activities I'll wear my jacket but change to a vest before I get on. If I start getting warm - I remove the vest - usually throw it on the mounting block or a jump standard ( but kept close at hand). If I continue to get warm - off comes the sweatshirt - which is why I try to use zip up ones ( easier to remove while mounted). When I start cooling the horse down, I start putting layers back on. The key is you need to remove layers BEFORE you start to sweat.
For the lowers - I have silk long johns ( can find in hunter/ski sections as well as lands end - ps great christmas present!) and wear either regular or fleece riding pants depending on the temperature. If it is really cold I have outer pants that I put on until I get ready for ride.
I purchase the toasties or hand warmers from wal mart by the box!! 3 pairs per package at $1.99 - I put them in my boots as soon as I get to the barn - and I'm like you wear my hands and feet get very cold - then I'm miserable.

Hilary
Dec. 13, 2009, 03:13 PM
I find the best way to regulate my temperature when it's cold out is to have very warm pants/boots, and then be able to open up my top layers. I don't wear a hat - but instead use an ear warmer band. They say you lose a lot of heat through your head, and I have thick hair, so I don't wear a hat and then the rest of me doesn't get too warm. Also I find taking off my gloves makes me feel cooler if I'm busy and get heated up.

As does opening the collar/front of my jacket or shirt. Think trace clip!

Carrera
Dec. 13, 2009, 06:52 PM
Just a PSA about the toasites hand warmers... I got a box of 40 (or maybe 50) at Costco for $18.99

GREAT DEAL!!

bird4416
Dec. 13, 2009, 06:58 PM
Stay away from cotton as an under layer. If it gets sweat soaked it just holds in the moisture and makes you chilled. I'm a big fan of wool and fleece. They keep you warm and are good about wicking away the moisture.

SkipHiLad4me
Dec. 14, 2009, 09:45 AM
Any suggestions for good socks? My feet will sweat when I get hot while I'm riding :dead: but then my toes are FREEZING later. Are there some good moisture wicking socks out there that also keep your feet warm?

mkevent
Dec. 14, 2009, 10:00 AM
Skiphi- I usually use ski socks, sometimes with a wicking sock liner if it's really cold.

The trick is to read the label on the socks and usually it will tell you if it is a wicking material and what temp range it is intended for.

If you do mail order, I really like Sierra Trading Post-great prices and selection.

In_
Dec. 14, 2009, 12:01 PM
Well I hate the cold. And I have *no* tolerance for it. At. All.

So anything colder than 40: Underarmor turtleneck ColdGear, (sometimes a thin cotton tight shirt), wool sweater, winter jacket. Then jeans, carharrts, and Mountain Horse Cold Weather Tall boots. I normally take the winter jacket off once I get going. Gloves make the biggest difference - especially around barn wetness or cold metal. Hats are essential.

ChocoMare
Dec. 14, 2009, 12:17 PM
Any suggestions for good socks? My feet will sweat when I get hot while I'm riding :dead: but then my toes are FREEZING later. Are there some good moisture wicking socks out there that also keep your feet warm?

I was recommend Thor-Lo socks by COTHers a few years ago and they are terrific!

However, regardless of sock choice, Number One Most Important Thing To Do is have dry feet. :yes:

I had frostbite on my toes back in 1987 when I worked a long winter show.... since then I cannot tolerate the cold on my toes. So it's crucial for me to always spray my feet with Arrid XX Spray Anti-Perspirant and then a good coating of a Corn-Starch based powder before pulling on socks.

SkipHiLad4me
Dec. 14, 2009, 01:24 PM
Thanks for the tip Choco! I'll have to give that a try. Nothing is worse than frozen toes :no:

Mara
Dec. 14, 2009, 01:35 PM
Wool socks, insulated boots, gloves and glove liners and most important, a hat. I've found with that combination, while I'm working, I can usually take off my outer jacket and stick with the turtleneck and fleece.

x3. I sweat more than any 6 people I know combined - it's gross, especially in summer. So I love cold weather except for the damned hands-and-feet issues; they are NEVER warm and I do have Raynaud's as well, though not an extreme case (pun not intended). I have no problem with the upper body staying warm, legs are fine in long underwear + jeans, but my hands and feet need extra attention. Sock and glove liners don't eliminate the problem, but they definitely help, as do fleece linings in gloves and boots. (Wool socks make me scratch my feet bloody - no kidding).