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Hey Mickey
Dec. 8, 2009, 10:30 PM
So,
I'm toying with the idea of trying to plan a winter jumping clinic or clinics. But I've never planned anything like this before. I can barely plan a get together with my friends. So we will see.....

I know it obviously depends on who the clinician is, whether they are local-ish, if its a 1 or 2 day clinic. Where its held at. (the indoor at my barn is to small to do serious jumping)

I'd like to get Denny or Jimmy Wofford.
But if I get this together, I'll probably try to organize a clinic with someone more local.
How do you know what to charge people?
What happens if you have to cancel?
Whats the best way to advertise?

I'm in southern Ohio, about a hr. North of Cincy. if that matters.

Coppers mom
Dec. 9, 2009, 12:20 AM
I would first see what the clinician charges per lesson and to come out. That's how you decide how much to charge. If you would like to make money off of the whole thing, you then add whatever amount to each rider's entry, or charge for auditing.

As far as advertising, go everywhere. Print up tons of fliers and entry forms, and put them at every tack shop you can think of, pass them out at your trainers, send them in the mail, etc. It'd be great if you could also become affiliated with one of the local GMO's, and have them put it on their website.

And what happens if you have to cancel? Well, after the being disappointed bit, you just suck it up and tell everyone. Hopefully, there will be no cancellation fee you have to pay the clinician, but that all depends on who it is and how close to the date you're cancelling.

Janet
Dec. 9, 2009, 07:26 AM
Fee to clinician
budget $1000 to $4000 per day

Clinicain travel, food and lodging

Fee for facility
This also varies a lot, and could be a flat fee (e.g. $300 per day) or variable (e.g. $20 per horse)

Insurance
budget $100 (you can get insuraance through USEA)

Advertising

Other (e.g., food)

Figuring the fees is uses trial and error.
Add up your costs. Figure out the minimum number of riders (below that you would cancel) and figure out the cost per competitor.

Then redo the calculations with the number of riders you EXPECT, and with the MAX you could do.

Then play with different fee structures.

LAZ
Dec. 9, 2009, 10:33 AM
So,
I'm toying with the idea of trying to plan a winter jumping clinic or clinics. But I've never planned anything like this before. I can barely plan a get together with my friends. So we will see.....

I know it obviously depends on who the clinician is, whether they are local-ish, if its a 1 or 2 day clinic. Where its held at. (the indoor at my barn is to small to do serious jumping)

I'd like to get Denny or Jimmy Wofford.
But if I get this together, I'll probably try to organize a clinic with someone more local.
How do you know what to charge people?
What happens if you have to cancel?
Whats the best way to advertise?

I'm in southern Ohio, about a hr. North of Cincy. if that matters.

I doubt you can get Denny or Jimmy--I tried to get Denny to come do a clinic and was told he doesn't travel, (other than Susan Harris's anymore) and Jimmy was booked from here to eternity (more or less) when I checked with him.

I find winter clinics are hard to fill, and then early spring gets really busy. You need to keep in mind that you may end up subsidizing the clinic in order to make it a go--OK if you have several horses to ride, but hard if you're counting on it to cover its costs. Be sure to get the word out as far and soon as you can. Weekdays are an option, but again are much harder to fill, especially during the winter.

Robin@DHH
Dec. 9, 2009, 12:28 PM
Also take a look at what other clinics in your area charge
(especially the ones that are fairly popular and fill). If
you have to charge more than they do, you will very
likely have a significant problem.

Viva
Dec. 10, 2009, 02:20 PM
I had to twist Denny's arm for a year to drive an hour and a half to do a clinic at my place, and that was because we'd just opened, he was doing me a favor and I was a pain in the ass for an entire year :D
When I do clinics I decide the fee based on filling 50-60% of available slots, not on a full clinic. Be sure not to undercharge--you want the cost to be manageable, but you don't want to be left holding the financial bag at the end of the day.
One perk to offer is a dinner with the clinician in the evening--we usually just do a potluck at my house, and the clinician gives a Q&A if people want or just hangs out with everyone. It's a great way to build connections between participants and for people to rub elbows with their heroes. I invite auditors as well. It's been a lot of fun and keeps people coming back.