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rockfordbuckeye
Dec. 8, 2009, 09:27 PM
Here is a dumb question. I see a lot of riders that when they are "up" in the post, their ankles flex a little forward, down and out. Sooo...it kinda looks to me like a frog. I see some very good riders do this. What causes it? Is it the ideal? Is it acceptable in the equitation area?

I've wondered this my whole life because it seems like about 50:50 of riders I see do it or don't do it!

TheOneandOnly
Dec. 8, 2009, 10:24 PM
Ive always been told its ideal. It shows that your absorbing shock in all the right places, have your weight in your heels, and aren't pinching with your knees. right?:confused:

joiedevie99
Dec. 8, 2009, 11:02 PM
Ankles and knees are shock absorbers. You should drop a little more weight into your heels as you come up in your post- which opens your knee angle just a little. Some people do it in a very exaggerated way- which shows that they are transferring too much weight into their heel and not distributing it between heel, inner calf and inner thigh.

Not So Practical Horse(WO)man
Dec. 9, 2009, 06:17 AM
I was always taught to do it. But after a month with no stirrup I stopped and never did it again...I have stirrups on my saddle but dont really use them anymore. The only time I do use them is landing after a jump or if I have a horse that feels really good.

RolyPolyPony
Dec. 9, 2009, 08:57 AM
My instructor has me try to do that (well, the ankle fwd and down - not the out)- I'm not entirely sure if it's because I'm getting back into riding after a long break and need to sort of exaggerate movements to get them down or what ;) She also has me bend my knee on the downs, so I'm opening my knee angle and pushing my heels down and fwd on the ups, and closing the knee angle on the downs. When I concentrate on doing so, my leg definitely stays where it should much better and my posting is a lot smoother, and the schoolies seem happier about me being up there :)

fair judy
Dec. 9, 2009, 04:32 PM
could simply be a "pulsing" or active leg on a dull horse.

rwh
Dec. 9, 2009, 05:13 PM
I was taught that it is a good (read: effective) leg on a beginning/intermediate rider as it shows a strong, stable lower leg with a deep heel but that it disappears in the upper levels where the riders can maintain the same flexed ankle and nice, steady contact without all the fuss/motion (ie can achieve an effective ride while remaining pretty/eliminating distractions).

hntrjmprpro45
Dec. 9, 2009, 06:13 PM
Hmm I usually don't see that with upper level riders. Its common with beginners as they are really focusing on their heels being down but as you get more advanced you should be able to maintain even leg pressure from thigh to knee to heel WHILE keeping your heel down. And this should not change from sitting, posting, two point, etc.

Ideally you should be able to stare at the riders leg and not be able to tell what gait they are in or what they are doing (no swinging at the canter, no "frog legging" at the posting trot, etc). It should be tight and effective at all gaits- heel down, lower leg just behind the girth (unless you are doing leg yielding in which your leg will be further back). If the rider needs to pump their heel to keep the horse moving forward I would suggest either strengthening the leg or spurs (or both).

RolyPolyPony
Dec. 9, 2009, 07:27 PM
Hmm I usually don't see that with upper level riders. Its common with beginners as they are really focusing on their heels being down but as you get more advanced you should be able to maintain even leg pressure from thigh to knee to heel WHILE keeping your heel down. And this should not change from sitting, posting, two point, etc.
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Yes, this sounds right, and why my instructor has me doing it :) I don't remember doing it when I rode as a teenager, before my 10+ year break!