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View Full Version : Saddle SOAKED under roof leak - Help!



Kaelurus
Dec. 5, 2009, 07:23 PM
So Central Florida has been drenched with rain for the past two days, and when it finally dried out enough for me to head out the the farm I board it, I discovered a leak had sprung in the tack room roof. No one noticed it, and it was directly over my tack. My saddle is soaked completely through. I've seriously never seen leather this wet. What do I do??

Petstorejunkie
Dec. 5, 2009, 07:32 PM
the smart assed response is hold your BO liable to replace your saddle.
If you don't want to go that route, your best bet is to contact the manufacturer and have them give you instructions on how to revive it. They know all the tricks that will work best for your saddle.

Good luck, I would have fallen over clutching my chest if I had found such a sight!

2ndyrgal
Dec. 5, 2009, 07:33 PM
with heat. Take it home where it can be in a warm, dry place and wait for it to dry. Depending on what type of saddle it is, you may need to have it re-flocked or at least have someone take out the flocking, fluff it up and put it back in correctly. Once it dries completely at home, condition it, oil it, or whatever you do normally, it should be just fine. It takes an awful lot to actually "ruin" leather that has been well maintained in the first place. Also, be careful what you place it on to dry that it doesn't make dents in the bottom of the saddle where it rests on your horse.

Kaelurus
Dec. 6, 2009, 07:14 PM
Thanks for the input! The saddle is drying out pretty well so far, but I guess I'll just have to wait and see. I'm not sure how wet the flocking got. Once it dries I'll have it checked out.

I've have not interest in getting into an argument with the BO over this, as s*** happens, and he has always been very good to me, so lets just cross our fingers the saddle turns out ok!

sadlmakr
Dec. 6, 2009, 07:29 PM
Thanks for the input! The saddle is drying out pretty well so far, but I guess I'll just have to wait and see. I'm not sure how wet the flocking got. Once it dries I'll have it checked out.

I've have not interest in getting into an argument with the BO over this, as s*** happens, and he has always been very good to me, so lets just cross our fingers the saddle turns out ok!

Just let the saddle dry in the house. Away from heat. After it gets mostly dry you can go over it with Leather New. I have had some that sat in a leaky barn for a whole winter that came out OK with Leather New. It might be OK in the panels as the rest of the saddle may have protected them.
I'd suggest getting a water proof cover for it. They are sold in most of the saddlery supply catalogs.
Or you can make you own. I think Suitability.com has a pattern to make your own.
I would mention it to the Barn Owner though. He might want to patch the roof over the tack room at least.
Sorry about the heavy rains there. Just watch out for animals in pairs marching along in a line somewhere. That happened along time ago and a guy named Noah ended up taking care of them all in his big boat.
Wishing you well. Kind regards, sadlmakr

Snicklefritz
Dec. 7, 2009, 11:09 AM
So Central Florida has been drenched with rain for the past two days, and when it finally dried out enough for me to head out the the farm I board it, I discovered a leak had sprung in the tack room roof. No one noticed it, and it was directly over my tack. My saddle is soaked completely through. I've seriously never seen leather this wet. What do I do??

I had a Pessoa saddle and Vogul boots submerged in salt water surge from Hurricane Opal in 1995 and took them to a shoe repair shop. I told them what happened and told them to do whatever they could to salvage them. I still have both today and use those boots daily!!! I don't know what they did but I left it in their hands and they did whatever good shoe repair guys do. :)

Kaelurus
Dec. 7, 2009, 06:59 PM
Sadlmakr - Thanks for the tip. It is mostly dry at this point, and seems to be doing alright. I think the panels survived, thankfully. I will get some leather new, and give that a try. BTW, the BO does know about the leak, and is working on getting it fixed.

Snicklefritz - good idea! We have a pretty good saddle repair shop around here, but like I said above, I think its going to be ok :D

Hilary
Dec. 7, 2009, 07:22 PM
Haven't had that kind of soaking, but my saddle has been used in drenching rain several times - and as far as I could tell was soaked through. I just let it dry as others have suggested - tip it up, so the panels get air too (yeah, it was so wet the part of the saddle touching the HORSE got soaked through) and then I applied leather conditioner until it was supple again. I tried conditioning it while it was still wet and that didn't really help any.

I've had the saddle for 5 years now and it's in fine shape. I apply Lederbalsam if I know ahead of time we'll be riding in a downpour - that seems to help repel at least some of the water.

gloriginger
Dec. 7, 2009, 07:28 PM
If you think it is ruined, you can make a claim on your homeowners policy.

Foxtrot's
Dec. 7, 2009, 09:51 PM
In the days when I hunted with the Fraser Valle Hunt my saddle went swimming in the Fraser River several times as hounds crossed the sandbanks where it would get pretty deep. That and the eternal rain. It was always quite fine after being allowed to slowly dry out in a warm place (not against a radiator/stove or anything like that), and conditioned. It was a Passier though and they are tough. I don't know if it got totally soaked through to the flocking, though.

bort84
Dec. 8, 2009, 03:26 PM
I've also heard people recommend you keep a slightly damp towel around the saddle while it dries naturally to minimize water marks and help the saddle dry evenly (this is mostly a cosmetic thing so you don't get weird spots). Then once the saddle is almost dry (not totally dry though), you should apply a leather conditioner (not oil - use something like Leather Therapy's conditioner, Effax or Lexol, the conditioner, not the neatsfoot oil) all over the saddle, allow it to absorb, and repeat as needed. The leather conditioner coats should be very light and even to make sure all of the conditioners soak in evenly. If you glob it on, a lot of the good stuff just stays on top of the saddle and never absorbs.

Also, you may need to have your flocking redone... That's annoying, but if it was completely soaked, you may develop mold issues that can transfer to the rest of the interior workings of your saddle - not good.

SevenDogs
Dec. 8, 2009, 05:34 PM
Here's hoping with proper drying, it is okay but if it isn't, it may be covered under your home owner's insurance (if you have it). My tack is covered (even though it is kept at a boarding facility, which always struck me as odd?). Depending on its value, it might be worth checking if things don't dry out well.

Brigit
Dec. 9, 2009, 03:42 PM
Once it's looking like it's pretty dry make sure you really oil it well. Use something that really absorbs into the leather to help put the proper moisture back into it and keep it supple. A lot of times leather that gets that wet can be pretty over-dry and brittle afterwards. Use a product that has lanolin in it and after that has absorbed into it, use a glycerin soap to help "seal" the good moisture/oils in.
I bet you'll be able to restore your saddle with some elbow grease. I've seen saddles that got dunked in rivers (little deeper than someone thought) or soaked from a heavy rain.