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ThisIsIt
Dec. 5, 2009, 06:24 AM
EDIT: I am 13 and taking lessons twice a week. I do not own, and I do not lease at the moment. I think this is a perfectly acceptable question to ask?
I don't understand how it blew up into a whole new realm. So I am sorry for any confusion.

SaturdayNightLive
Dec. 5, 2009, 09:46 AM
Try shoulder in, shoulder fore, haunches in, and haunches fore (not in that order :lol:). Then maybe do a little leg yielding. My favorite exercise at the canter is to canter down the center of the arena, leg yield to the rail, continue cantering the end of the ring on the counter lead, then halt on the other long side.

Clarence
Dec. 5, 2009, 09:56 AM
Okay, this is not to be mean, but isn't part of your trainer's responsibility to teach you how to ride a horse on your own?
I am glad you are taking responsibility for yourself by asking for some exercises on this board, but shouldn't the goal of your lessons be that your trainer says less and less and you become a thinking rider or is that the European in me?

Petstorejunkie
Dec. 5, 2009, 09:59 AM
spiral in and out on a circle using shoulder fore

counter canter the longside and work on your flying changes in the corners

Haalter
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:33 AM
My favorite exercise at the canter is to canter down the center of the arena, leg yield to the rail, continue cantering the end of the ring on the counter lead, then halt on the other long side.You are describing a half-pass, not a leg yield ;)

SaturdayNightLive
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:38 AM
Maybe. You can leg yield at the canter right? Because there is no way what my horse and I have been doing qualifies as a half pass. We aren't nearly that refined. :lol:

Haalter
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:43 AM
If you were leg-yielding, you would end up on correct (inside) lead at the wall, not the counter canter. When your horse is bent in the direction it is moving laterally, that's a half-pass. Either way, both are great exercises for a hunter/jumper/eq horse, even if they aren't done with the precision/refinement expected in a Dressage test :)

lcw579
Dec. 5, 2009, 11:32 AM
Okay, this is not to be mean, but isn't part of your trainer's responsibility to teach you how to ride a horse on your own?
I am glad you are taking responsibility for yourself by asking for some exercises on this board, but shouldn't the goal of your lessons be that your trainer says less and less and you become a thinking rider or is that the European in me?

It's not just the European in you... This question made me want to bang my head against the wall.... Or maybe the trainer that isn't fostering independence in the student.

ThisIsIt
Dec. 5, 2009, 12:31 PM
Simply because I do not lease and I do not own my own horse at the moment so I only ride during lessons? I don't understand why it is such a terrible thing to ask about some exercises to do on my own? Maybe I am being ignorant, but I don't see how that would make anyone "bang their head against the wall"

Foxdale Farm
Dec. 5, 2009, 01:13 PM
Just watched a George Morris clinic yesterday and it was amazing. I felt like I was watching a dressage clinic with lots of jumping mixed in. He had riders doing lots of flat exercises to get their horses softer and more engaged. The big thing he emphasized was inside leg to outside rein, keeping the outside rein steady while giving on the inside rein according to a certain rhythm. He would have them bring their inside hand at the same level as their outside hand for 3 counts and then give the inside rein straight down toward the horses' mouths for 1 count, doing it over and over again in that same rhythm until the horse softened up on the inside and was steady in the outside rein. They would switch directions often, doing the same exercise at both the trot and the canter. His BIG thing that he practically shouted at everyone to remember was the inside leg to the outside rein and "leg to mouth" not the other way around. He also had them doing lots of transitions from walk to trot and trot to canter, until the horses were quick and light off the aids with each upward transition and quick to do the downward transitions with an uphill feel in both the upward and downward transitions. All the horses got visibly more relaxed through their backs, which then really improved the jumping.

He got on two different trainers' horses and got them supple and soft to the point where everyone in the audience was in awe at the difference it made in each horse, and these were very successful trainers in our area riding Grand Prix horses.

It was absolutely impressive to watch him get on these horses he had never ridden before and be able to soften and relax them as well as improve their jumping technique within just a few minutes.

He wrote a book called Hunter Seat Equitation that I have never read, but I would imagine describes many of these types of exercises.

I am not a jumper rider, but as a dressage person, I was really impressed.

www.foxdalefarm.us

Clarence
Dec. 5, 2009, 02:10 PM
Simply because I do not lease and I do not own my own horse at the moment so I only ride during lessons? I don't understand why it is such a terrible thing to ask about some exercises to do on my own? Maybe I am being ignorant, but I don't see how that would make anyone "bang their head against the wall"

Thisisit,

I am sorry. I didn't mean to upset you. I was seriously wondering how you could not have learned to ride on your own. Of course, I wasn't thinking about the option that you don't own your own horse. So, if you don't own your own horse, that does change a lot. Please look at my other thread for some different views on the topic.

SaturdayNightLive
Dec. 5, 2009, 11:20 PM
If you were leg-yielding, you would end up on correct (inside) lead at the wall, not the counter canter. When your horse is bent in the direction it is moving laterally, that's a half-pass. Either way, both are great exercises for a hunter/jumper/eq horse, even if they aren't done with the precision/refinement expected in a Dressage test :)

Lol yep, you're right. My life makes much more sense now. Thanks!

fourmares
Dec. 6, 2009, 12:12 AM
I'm confused... since you don't lease or own do you have a horse to ride when you aren't in a lesson? At what level are you riding? Some of the exercises that people are suggesting are pretty advanced. Without knowing what level you ride at, and what you need to to work on it is hard for stangers to know what kind of execises to suggest. You might ask your trainer for homework.

Cita
Dec. 6, 2009, 12:23 AM
Simply because I do not lease and I do not own my own horse at the moment so I only ride during lessons? I don't understand why it is such a terrible thing to ask about some exercises to do on my own? Maybe I am being ignorant, but I don't see how that would make anyone "bang their head against the wall"

Settle down. ;) People are upset primarily because they feel it is an instructor's job to give you "homework." In other words, you shouldn't have to ask an online forum, you should be able to ask your instructor for exercises that are appropriate for you.

I empathize - I have never owned a horse and have only very rarely had the opportunity to lease.