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View Full Version : WWYD?? Can I turn short term pain to long term gain?



Trevelyan96
Dec. 2, 2009, 10:57 PM
I have been informed that I wlll be taking over major resposibilties on a case from hell. There is no way around it or out of it, I'm seeing lots of overtime until late spring.

My dilemma is my 2 'loves' out in the barn! There will be precious little time for even basic chores, let alone riding or training.

Should I bite the bullet, milk the overtime for all its worth, and use the extra money board the boys out for a few months? Maybe send one or both for training. Rico has never once been hacked out on trail, and I would love to do that but am scared to take him on my own.

It would give me, DH, and the property a break, but the few times I've let my horses out of my care, they've come back broken. Trav came back from trainer with a SI and Rico came back with a back injury, so the thought of boarding them when I'll be too busy to check on them more than once a week or so is scary. There really is only one person I know right now that I'd trust with my horses, but I can't afford to send them both there, even with the OT.

Then again, rationally I know that if a boarding situation doesn't work out, its not like I wouldn't have anyplace to take them, they can just come back home, right?

HealingHeart
Dec. 2, 2009, 11:48 PM
Why don't you hire a in-house trainer to come to you and perhaps they know something that is looking for extra $$ that can help with the barns stuff...., at least you know they will be safe, well cared for and you can take breaks to go check on them.... instead of worry about the care during the weather months..

You will not have the energy to worry about a non-trusting situation..... so either find one that can work or don't make a change.

buschkn
Dec. 3, 2009, 02:18 AM
What is your pasture set up? Do you have run-ins? Do they normally live in? Personally I think you should kick them out for the winter. It is very little work to have horses out 24/7, toss a bale of hay out every day, get down to bare minimum, give them and you a break while you work so hard. With the extra money you can maybe hire someone to come out a couple days a week to do chores so you can sleep in on a rare day off, or you and DH can have a dinner night etc.

Then save all that extra OT $ and when spring rolls around and you are wrapping things up you can send them both to a trainer for a month to get back into the swing of things and use the rest of that cash-ola to take lessons, go to shows, or whatever you like to do. You will be working so hard, you should use some of the money for YOU. Obviously spending it on the horses benefits you, too, but I think this way you would have something to look forward to to slug through all the hard work and come out on the other side.

I think most horses benefit from time off in the winter. Most of mine do and seem to come back fresher and ready to work come spring. JM2Cents :)

Alagirl
Dec. 3, 2009, 02:22 AM
Hire somebody to muck stalls.

Trevelyan96
Dec. 5, 2009, 12:36 AM
Why don't you hire a in-house trainer to come to you and perhaps they know something that is looking for extra $$ that can help with the barns stuff...., at least you know they will be safe, well cared for and you can take breaks to go check on them.... instead of worry about the care during the weather months..

You will not have the energy to worry about a non-trusting situation..... so either find one that can work or don't make a change.

HH, I would love to have a trainer come to me... but around these parts they're hard to find. The good ones all have their own place and want you to come to them. I've considered hiring stall cleaners, but that's actually the least of my problems... horses are out almost 24/7, and DD will be home for winter break. Its Feb & Mar I'm panicked about right now.

I've just been out of the loop for so long.. have horses at home and switched from the hunters to dressage, so my hunter crowd is annoyed with me but the dressage crowd hasn't acccepte me yet. I just really don't know anyone anymore, which is amusing as I was always the 'fixer rider' back in the day'. Now I can't find anyone to ride mine!

ShotenStar
Dec. 5, 2009, 08:57 AM
When I was still a working person I did many, many, many months of required overtime and shift work. The horses always survived the time off, and as said above, it did them good to have the rest.

I managed by stripping my barn care routines to the minimum:
-horses were out as much as possible
-minimum bedding in stalls / run-ins to speed cleaning
-minimum blanket switching
-meals were not fed at the exact same times due to the rotations of the shift work schedules, but they were fed within the same 3 hour blocks AM and PM. The horses adjusted with no problems.
-grooming sometimes got reduced to the weekends and I did not clip. They looked a little 'rough' but were quite happy.


In this economy, extra money should not be sneezed at or turned down. The horses will be fine with a minimalist routine.

*star*

jn4jenny
Dec. 5, 2009, 09:06 AM
Should I bite the bullet, milk the overtime for all its worth, and use the extra money board the boys out for a few months? Maybe send one or both for training. Rico has never once been hacked out on trail, and I would love to do that but am scared to take him on my own.

I'd milk the overtime for all it's worth BUT leave the horses at home. You can decide later whether to use the overtime profits for training in April and May, or for more lessons for you, or whatever you like.

Your horses will probably love having 2 months off, and if they're already out 24/7 it shouldn't be a huge switch.

Alagirl
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:22 AM
I'd milk the overtime for all it's worth BUT leave the horses at home. You can decide later whether to use the overtime profits for training in April and May, or for more lessons for you, or whatever you like.

Your horses will probably love having 2 months off, and if they're already out 24/7 it shouldn't be a huge switch.


sounds like the most sensible solution.

Trevelyan96
Dec. 5, 2009, 05:42 PM
Well, its snowing to beat the band out there today and they're standing outside in their turnout blankets sopping wet instead of going into their nice dry stalls with the racks full of hay, so I guess they can survive going feral for a few more months, and I'll just have to suck up and beg trainer to take me back when the case is over.

It was a PITA for me to try to find a dryish spot in the pasture to put their hay out for them, but I guess its still easier than cleaning stalls 2x daily.

Thanks all. I think I will take all that OT and send them both out for training in the spring.