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View Full Version : Advice needed please, my 3 year old quarter horse filly is jumping over my 5' fence!



horseowner40
Dec. 2, 2009, 09:28 PM
My 3 year old Quarter Horse filly, has caused so many problems and I am at my wit's end. I got her as a starved 2 year old, managed to put weight on her, and then this past fall she was due her shot's but came down with West Nile, I got her over that. Now for the new problem, my husband spend all summer building me a 5' tall horse fence with poly wire and solid wood post every 10 feet, and I have not taught her to jump at all, but she gets about 20 feet from the fence and leaps over like she a jumper, DID I TELL YOU THAT SHE IS ONLY 14'2 HANDS TALL! I don't know what to do now, any advise would help and the sooner the better.:eek:

dmalbone
Dec. 2, 2009, 10:18 PM
Use extenders to run a hot as hell hotwire on top of the posts. They screw into the tops and make it at least another 6" tall. Then also run another hotwire inside of the fence, offset to the inside (not flush with the posts). Make her terrified of that fence.

horseowner40
Dec. 2, 2009, 10:25 PM
Use extenders to run a hot as hell hotwire on top of the posts. They screw into the tops and make it at least another 6" tall. Then also run another hotwire inside of the fence, offset to the inside (not flush with the posts). Make her terrified of that fence.

Should I use solar or the battery kind? also is this normal for her to be doing this?:confused:

dmalbone
Dec. 2, 2009, 10:59 PM
I would personally use the electric. I'm debating between this one: http://www.kencove.com/fence/detail.php?code=EXD6 and this one right now: http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=2&pf_id=0028431

There are some horses who just like to jump!Is she scared when she's doing it? Is she in a dry lot and grass is on the other side? Horses she's trying to get to? Good luck. That's my biggest fear. Our fences are going to be 5 1/2' tall and I'm terrified about it.

goodhors
Dec. 2, 2009, 11:43 PM
Better burn her on the wire first. You don't want her trying to go over the extra height you add and getting tangled in hot wire.

Some young horses are suicidal, just keep hurting themselves. You have to figure what is setting them off to find trouble.

WHY doesn't she like the enclosure? Why can't she be turned out with others? Socializing is about as important as keeping her healthy, so friends are important.

lolita1
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:53 AM
Off course and not trying to be rude but I'd think about selling her to a jumper that is real talent that is hard to breed.

I agree with the fencing and trying to work out why she is jumping out. My old horse used to do it when she was stressed about a situation.

OverandOnward
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:06 AM
Yeah that above, in all seriousness. Find a skilled, ambitious and tiny jumper rider, junior or amateur, and let rider and horse have the time of their lives together. Hopefully she finds that satisfying and doesn't need to prove more in pasture ... but anyway, it won't be your problem to solve anymore. :)

Oldenburg Mom
Dec. 3, 2009, 08:11 AM
Well, when my stallion came home to live, I HAD to make his turnout jump-proof. It was not an option. And it did look a bit weird, but he never even TRIED to jump out. He could clear 5' easily ... and had as a two-year old (not under saddle.) I don't know if this is feasible, as I don't know how big her turnout is ... but here goes (and NO laughing!)

We took pressure treated 2x4s and cut them into two-foot lengths, screwed them onto the current fence posts, then hot wired the top. It was cheap and solved the problem. We used 2" tape and he never even looked sideways,... never even THOUGHT about jumping. It was well over 6.5 feet tall.

The turnout...probably 1/2 an acre (maybe more) was easily done in a day. BUT, it wasn't visible from the road, so the fact that it looked a bit odd didn't bother us.

Maybe this will inspire someone to post a better solution. But it did work...

Go Fish
Dec. 3, 2009, 02:16 PM
Figure out why she's trying to get out...

When my mare was two, she did this. I had her in a separate field from the broodmares because I didn't want her hurt (she's was a WEE bit "assertive" for a two-year-old). But she insisted on wanting to be in the other field, so I just left her there. Yes, she got a bit banged up, but she survived.

RougeEmpire
Dec. 3, 2009, 02:34 PM
Is she an "only horse" ? Horses rarely leave the safely of the herd, sounds like she is looking for a buddy. A young horse like that SHOULD be kept with one or more OLDER well adjusted horses. Nothing worse than a bratty baby bully that's never had a proper "miss manners" class from an Old Broodmare. Giver a REASON to STAY in the pen, aka her herd.

dmalbone
Dec. 3, 2009, 02:37 PM
Is she an only horse? I don't see that anywhere but I keep seeing people mention it. Didn't know if I missed it.

sdlbredfan
Dec. 3, 2009, 02:37 PM
I agree with sell her as a jumper, unless that is why you got her yourself? I agree with find out why she wants to jump out, and if she is alone, get her a buddy. Do you have any pictures of the environment she is in? Somehow I think having a visual of the whole scene could help us all brainstorm?

LJStarkey
Dec. 3, 2009, 03:55 PM
Do you have a feed in her turnout? Many QH I have known have been less inclined to think about athletic activities that can get them killed if they have a stack of hay in front of them. Just a thought.

I wouldn't actually want to train her to fear the fence, but if you put the flapping flags on your hot wire, you can train her to fear the hot wire -- not fences in general.

mjrtango93
Dec. 3, 2009, 04:44 PM
Do you have a feed in her turnout? Many QH I have known have been less inclined to think about athletic activities that can get them killed if they have a stack of hay in front of them. Just a thought.

Ok sorry just saw this about the QH and had to laugh! So we have a bigger guy about 16 hh that is a fabulous kids horse, some sort of appendix QH looking guy. At this point he is right around 17 years old, has navicular and really isn't the most athletic thing to begin with if you catch my drift. We cannot keep him in our pastures! With a buddy, without a buddy, in the dry lot, on the 40 acre grass. All property is fenced in the 3" wide hot tape, 3 strands each with quite a current running through it, and its close to 6' tall in most places, only exaggerated by the angle of the hill making it much steeper from take off point, but too low to the ground to go under. Doesn't matter what pasture you put him in, guaranteed he will not be in the same one when you come back! Sometimes goes for a stroll on the property, sometimes wanders back to the barn, sometimes joins a different group of horses in the adjoining pasture (the mares are not so thrilled with this trick). We haven't caught him in the act yet, and can't figure out how the hell he does it. Tape is never down, never has cuts or burn marks from the tape, no freaking clue, and all other horses are exactly where we left them!

BuddyRoo
Dec. 3, 2009, 05:12 PM
Sounds like you need to focus this talent! :)

In all seriousness...as others have mentioned, I'd try to get to the root of the problem. If she's already clearing the thing, a little bit of hotwire may create more danger than preventative.

cloudyandcallie
Dec. 3, 2009, 05:18 PM
Advice? OK

1. Keep the filly.:lol:

2. Reward her everytime she jumps 4 or 5' clear. (I do:lol: and my boy has cleared hot wire many times.)

3. Let us all know when you start showing her in the jumpers!

FatPalomino
Dec. 3, 2009, 10:04 PM
Post a video of her jumping so we can see her form :yes: You might have your problem solved and get enough money to fence your fields in golden rails if she's truly under 14.2 and has that much scope :D

FWIW, one of our rescues cleared 3'9" routinely as a 11 hand yearling. He tried and made it over 5' then, also, but taking down the top rail. Kudos for him attempting something a foot or two above his eyes. Long story short, previous adopter taught him to run loose on the farm every afternoon for fun before dinner, since the orphan weanling would come back when called :D Turning him out with the big horses distracted him enough to stop it.

But, he is 3 now and still defiantly headed towards a life over fences. Good mover, balanced, good form, and loves jumping!

Timex
Dec. 4, 2009, 11:28 AM
sorry, but i just don't believe it without video. ;)

Mozart
Dec. 4, 2009, 11:44 AM
I advise you to put her in a trailer and send her to me.......

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:07 PM
Better burn her on the wire first. You don't want her trying to go over the extra height you add and getting tangled in hot wire.

Some young horses are suicidal, just keep hurting themselves. You have to figure what is setting them off to find trouble.

WHY doesn't she like the enclosure? Why can't she be turned out with others? Socializing is about as important as keeping her healthy, so friends are important.

We are going to put up some hot wire next week. I have no idea why she does not like her pasture, but she is alone and she is our only horse, so maybe she is looking for a buddy, I just don't know. We spent so much time building this fence for her and she goes over it with no effort, I told my husband she may have to get a new home..:eek:

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:18 PM
sorry, but i just don't believe it without video. ;)

I understand that, it is hard for me to believe as well, I have her locked up in a stall right now until I can get some hot wire up next week. I have never jumped anything myself other than a log, and got her for trail riding, she is might be lonely, I just don't know why she is doing this, but we sunk 8' poles 3' feet in the ground, and set our poly plus wire at 15",30", 45", and the top strand is 60" and when I stand with her in the pasture she just stands around grazing and eating hay, but the minute I live the pasture she run's straight South turns and heads straight toward the North side of the fence and never slows down and leaps over this thing, my husband got to see it yesterday and he is shocked as well, but she really does not go anywhere, so I may take a video this weekend so you guys can see...:eek:

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:25 PM
I would personally use the electric. I'm debating between this one: http://www.kencove.com/fence/detail.php?code=EXD6 and this one right now: http://www.jefferslivestock.com/ssc/product.asp?CID=2&pf_id=0028431

There are some horses who just like to jump!Is she scared when she's doing it? Is she in a dry lot and grass is on the other side? Horses she's trying to get to? Good luck. That's my biggest fear. Our fences are going to be 5 1/2' tall and I'm terrified about it.


She is happy if I stand in the pasture with her but when I leave that is when she leaves. She is the only horse we have so I guess she is lonely, I never thought that a small quarter horse would even attempt this, but I have her locked up in a stall right now until I get the hot wire up. Oh and she has a 1500 lb round bale of hay, and I feed her twice a day as well as give her 2 apples a day, so I know she is not hungry, maybe the feed is making her hyper. If I had it to do over again I would put up a 6' fence. Good luck with yours!:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:31 PM
Better burn her on the wire first. You don't want her trying to go over the extra height you add and getting tangled in hot wire.

Some young horses are suicidal, just keep hurting themselves. You have to figure what is setting them off to find trouble.

WHY doesn't she like the enclosure? Why can't she be turned out with others? Socializing is about as important as keeping her healthy, so friends are important.


She is an only child, I think you are right she is lonely, because she comes to our front yard after she jumps, my dog is her only buddy. What do you suggest I do for her?:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:42 PM
Off course and not trying to be rude but I'd think about selling her to a jumper that is real talent that is hard to breed.

I agree with the fencing and trying to work out why she is jumping out. My old horse used to do it when she was stressed about a situation.

I hope I can get her to stop this behavior, but if not she will have to find a new home, I can't keep her stalled 24/7. I have never been a jumper but this girl enjoys doing this and shows no fear, but my heart nearly jumped out of my chest each time we saw her take flight, I thought only tall horse's could jump, but I was wrong, any horse can jump! We have a interstate road barrier on the dirt road behind her pasture and it is about 4' tall, she has been jumping that for fun all summer, and after she jumps she shakes her head and puts her tale up and prances around, we left this in her pasture for her because she does like to play jump over it, but I never thought she would jump this fence! the to wire is at 60" high.. what would you do with girl?:)

Hip
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:43 PM
I have used the yellow nylon (or poly?) thin rope looped slightly loosely between the posts so that it swings a little bit in the wind. "Supposedly" the horse can't get an eyelock on it to gauge how high to jump or where to jump it, due to the wind movement, so, won't do it.

If you want her to be a jumper, this might not be a good idea but if you really, really need to keep her in, this might work for you.

Also, a bonus, works to keep deer out of your front yard/garden!

Chall
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:44 PM
How about a donkey, mini, goat or sheep companion?

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:47 PM
Well, when my stallion came home to live, I HAD to make his turnout jump-proof. It was not an option. And it did look a bit weird, but he never even TRIED to jump out. He could clear 5' easily ... and had as a two-year old (not under saddle.) I don't know if this is feasible, as I don't know how big her turnout is ... but here goes (and NO laughing!)

We took pressure treated 2x4s and cut them into two-foot lengths, screwed them onto the current fence posts, then hot wired the top. It was cheap and solved the problem. We used 2" tape and he never even looked sideways,... never even THOUGHT about jumping. It was well over 6.5 feet tall.

The turnout...probably 1/2 an acre (maybe more) was easily done in a day. BUT, it wasn't visible from the road, so the fact that it looked a bit odd didn't bother us.

Maybe this will inspire someone to post a better solution. But it did work...

My husband spent the day today cutting steel post into to act as extension's, so much for a pretty fence..he is going to screw them into the wood post and stretch hot wire, but right now she is up in a stall until I can fix this problem oh and by the way, I did try tying walmart plastic bags to our fence but she was not scared of the bags...Thanks for the advice.:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:49 PM
Figure out why she's trying to get out...

When my mare was two, she did this. I had her in a separate field from the broodmares because I didn't want her hurt (she's was a WEE bit "assertive" for a two-year-old). But she insisted on wanting to be in the other field, so I just left her there. Yes, she got a bit banged up, but she survived.

She is an only child! she is lonely...I think:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:51 PM
Is she an only horse? I don't see that anywhere but I keep seeing people mention it. Didn't know if I missed it.

She is the only horse.:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:54 PM
Do you have a feed in her turnout? Many QH I have known have been less inclined to think about athletic activities that can get them killed if they have a stack of hay in front of them. Just a thought.

I wouldn't actually want to train her to fear the fence, but if you put the flapping flags on your hot wire, you can train her to fear the hot wire -- not fences in general.

She gets mixed feed 2 times a day with 2 apples each day and she has a 1500lb round bale of hay in her pasture, so you would think that would make her happy..:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 09:59 PM
Ok sorry just saw this about the QH and had to laugh! So we have a bigger guy about 16 hh that is a fabulous kids horse, some sort of appendix QH looking guy. At this point he is right around 17 years old, has navicular and really isn't the most athletic thing to begin with if you catch my drift. We cannot keep him in our pastures! With a buddy, without a buddy, in the dry lot, on the 40 acre grass. All property is fenced in the 3" wide hot tape, 3 strands each with quite a current running through it, and its close to 6' tall in most places, only exaggerated by the angle of the hill making it much steeper from take off point, but too low to the ground to go under. Doesn't matter what pasture you put him in, guaranteed he will not be in the same one when you come back! Sometimes goes for a stroll on the property, sometimes wanders back to the barn, sometimes joins a different group of horses in the adjoining pasture (the mares are not so thrilled with this trick). We haven't caught him in the act yet, and can't figure out how the hell he does it. Tape is never down, never has cuts or burn marks from the tape, no freaking clue, and all other horses are exactly where we left them!

I hate to say this but when I read this I laughed out loud, you said it all, if they want to get out they will..maybe your horse and mine would be so happy together, both being such smart butt know all horse's like they are. Kidding aside I feel sorry for you, its is scary to come home and your horse is somewhere other than where he should be.:lol:

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 10:10 PM
Advice? OK

1. Keep the filly.:lol:

2. Reward her everytime she jumps 4 or 5' clear. (I do:lol: and my boy has cleared hot wire many times.)

3. Let us all know when you start showing her in the jumpers!

I don't know how to jump, the only thing I have ever jumped was a log! But I think I am to blame for some of this after replying to some other post here, I realized that in her pasture we have 15' of concrete interstate barriers that are 4' tall, my husband moved these things there before we built her fence and we were going to move them out but Misty the horse started running and playing around these things and then she started jumping them for fun and after each jump she would shake her had and prance around, and I would laugh and even sometimes give her apple, and now I think I was rewarding this behavior, but I never dreamed that she would start jumping my fence, the top wire is 60" high with walmart plastic bags tied on it. I have a spinal problem from a previous horse accident in 1986 and I fractured my neck and my thoracic spine, so I cannot even think about jumping, but she does...:lol:

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 10:13 PM
I advise you to put her in a trailer and send her to me.......

Where are you located? I told my husband today if I could not keep her in a fence, I would gladly give her to someone who likes to jump, because she does.:)

horseowner40
Dec. 4, 2009, 10:54 PM
Misty has a 4 acre pasture, she is an only child, after reading all this great advice I believe two things are going on with her. Each time that she has jumped is after I live her pasture and I am walking back to the house and she beats me to the house, the other thing is she likes to jump. As I have been reading and replying tonight I realized that in her North pasture we have a 15' section of solid concrete interstate barrier that is 4' tall, I don't why my husband has it, but he does...he was going to move this out of her pasture but Misty would run around this barrier and then decided one day to to run at it and jump over, once she cleared it she would play, buck, prance and shake her head, and we were amused by this and I would go and give her an apple, soon this was a daily thing for her. I had know idea that she was training me to give her an apple or that I was training her to jump. I must be an idiot! and now she has started jumping this fence, the wire is at 15",30",45", and 60", but anyways when she did jump this fence the other day I caught her with apples, again I rewarded this behavior, and now she thinks that jumping a fence is the way to get an apple and get to visit with her only buddy, Bo the dog. I have Misty up in a 12 x 20 stall until we get the extensions on the fence and the hot wire up, but you guys are going to laugh at this, last week while in her stall she unearthed an old book, I thought that was strange, but then this morning we went out to give water and food and I have wheel barrel against the door to her stall and sitting on top of the wheel barrel is a very old pocket bible, right beneath where she hangs her head out, and it was layed opened to LUKE. I now think this horse is a clown and a troublemaker, she will not leave anything alone, everytime I open my front door she starts neighing, and neighs at everyone, so I know she is lonely. If she continues this jumping thing and this is what she wants to do, I will be happy to give her to a good home and find me a 20 year old gelding. Misty is a Reg. Quarter Horse, she is a beautiful blue roan, she has always gone barefoot on the prairie of North and South Dakota, her feet are so hard the farrier chooses to uses an electric sander on her feet. Another thing, I was riding her along the Missouri River this past summer and decided to go into the water, big mistake, she loved it and before I knew it she was in over her head, I jumped off and I thought I would never get her back she was just swimming around for fun, ever since then she sticks her whole muzzle in the water like she is diving for apples, so I want be riding her in the water again! We have an old wooden bridge by our house which is about 40' in length and 50' high, the bridge has some railing, Misty loves to trot across this thing, she likes to hear her clip clop I guess, but it scares me to death, this bridge has gaps of about 2" or more and water beneath, I think it is the water she likes. So now know all about her and as I said in more than one way she is more of an adventurer than I, so we may have to part ways. On her Mother's side she is out of Magnolia Bars and there are numerouse 16 hand there are numerous TB'S on her papers but she is reg Quarter Horse, I did research on her and found that most of the old TB'S were from Europe, I don't know a thing about breeding though. Thanks for all the advise.:lol:

sdlbredfan
Dec. 5, 2009, 12:33 AM
Kudos to you on realizing it may be best to find a home where she can continue doing what she enjoys so much. On the other hand, if that is the only problem you have with her, just get her a buddy! It does not have to be a full size horse, a mini or pony would be fine. You mentioned the Dakotas and the Missouri River, are you anywhere near Omaha? If you are, I can give you some names/numbers of HJ folks in the area who might like to take this enthusiastic jumper off your hands. (You can PM me if you like.)

Rescue_Rider9
Dec. 5, 2009, 11:16 AM
My mare does this.. She is also small. Every winter we block our horses in a small 1 acre lot and feed them hay and grain only so our pasture can grow. My mare likes to jump the round pen pannels that spereate the two pastures to eat grass.. yet when she jumps.. she is alone :) Send your pony to me! I would love her forever!

Grataan
Dec. 5, 2009, 12:41 PM
I would get her a buddy (preferably a really SHORT one lol)

Frank B
Dec. 5, 2009, 12:58 PM
Find a good H/J trainer! Remember the little QH Threes And Sevens -- that did GP?

ThatScaryChick
Dec. 5, 2009, 01:28 PM
Is there anyway you could get her a companion? Maybe another horse, mule or a donkey would keep her from being lonely and wanting to get out. She does sound like she is a talented little horse.

Equino
Dec. 5, 2009, 01:53 PM
My mare has a tendency to jump out, usually because she rather be out with certain horses (mares). The 1st time I ever saw it happen, another person was free lunging her, and she stopped by the 5'2" gate. The person cracked the whip, she circled at a trot, and very nicely, calmly jumped out, cantered a few steps, and started to graze. When I bought her she always had a T/O buddy, but preferred the mares. She would jump out of her T/O and into the pasture of whichever mare she felt like visiting that day. So, we always put her out in the pen that had electric fencing and that curbed things for a while, electric fencing or not. She moved to a new farm this fall and they only do solo T/O. There is a pony mare who talks to everyone, and my mare feels she speaking to her. She has jumped out twice, but they don't have any electric fencing paddock. Now they just put them out in different shifts and she has not jumped out again. At least with my mare she either grazes or calmly walks back to the barn, she doesn't seem to thinlK FREEDOM!, it's just something she knows she can do. Ideally, she'd have a buddy, or electric fencing.

I don't think jumping out of their T/O necessarily means they are made to be jumpers or that they LOVE to jump. I think it goes back to learning boundaries as a baby from their moms and if they don't learn that, nothing will keep them in.

horseowner40
Dec. 5, 2009, 08:48 PM
My mare has a tendency to jump out, usually because she rather be out with certain horses (mares). The 1st time I ever saw it happen, another person was free lunging her, and she stopped by the 5'2" gate. The person cracked the whip, she circled at a trot, and very nicely, calmly jumped out, cantered a few steps, and started to graze. When I bought her she always had a T/O buddy, but preferred the mares. She would jump out of her T/O and into the pasture of whichever mare she felt like visiting that day. So, we always put her out in the pen that had electric fencing and that curbed things for a while, electric fencing or not. She moved to a new farm this fall and they only do solo T/O. There is a pony mare who talks to everyone, and my mare feels she speaking to her. She has jumped out twice, but they don't have any electric fencing paddock. Now they just put them out in different shifts and she has not jumped out again. At least with my mare she either grazes or calmly walks back to the barn, she doesn't seem to thinlK FREEDOM!, it's just something she knows she can do. Ideally, she'd have a buddy, or electric fencing.

I don't think jumping out of their T/O necessarily means they are made to be jumpers or that they LOVE to jump. I think it goes back to learning boundaries as a baby from their moms and if they don't learn that, nothing will keep them in.

I agree with you, she is looking for a buddy, but she does like to jump that 4' concrete thing in the pasture. I think I am going to find her another home and look for an old horse that I can spoil!:)

horseowner40
Dec. 5, 2009, 08:50 PM
How about a donkey, mini, goat or sheep companion?

My husband says no, I wish I could get her a companion.:(

horseowner40
Dec. 5, 2009, 08:58 PM
Kudos to you on realizing it may be best to find a home where she can continue doing what she enjoys so much. On the other hand, if that is the only problem you have with her, just get her a buddy! It does not have to be a full size horse, a mini or pony would be fine. You mentioned the Dakotas and the Missouri River, are you anywhere near Omaha? If you are, I can give you some names/numbers of HJ folks in the area who might like to take this enthusiastic jumper off your hands. (You can PM me if you like.)

My husband does not want to get her a companion, we are going to try the hot wire and if that does not work she needs someone better than me, because I can't jump! I live in Pierre, SD, I will PM you this week if she jumps the electric, I just want her to have a great home, and I will look for an old gelding that wants to be spoiled, but I must say this gal is the smartest animal I have ever seen, and is talented at jumping, she puts both front feet together and goes for it, it takes my breath away but she enjoys it. I will know next week, thanks for helping me if I need her to find a new home.:)

sdlbredfan
Dec. 5, 2009, 09:00 PM
Maybe if you get a horse hubby can ride he will change his mind. Do you work too? If you do, put your foot down figuratively speaking, use your money and go buy a companion for the critter. Horses are social animals, just as dogs are, and it can be considered unkind to keep a horse in solitary confinement. Dogs at least can pal around with the humans, as their pack, but a singleton horse is rightfully fearful of predators. They need another equid around so that each can take turns watching for predators while the other one rests.

FatPalomino
Dec. 5, 2009, 09:30 PM
I'll certainly find you a husband proof old trail horse from the Rocky Mountains and trade if you'd like. :D Our fence jumper is barely 3, so we can see which one of them matures to be better over fences :)

suz
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:04 PM
damn, she sounds like a ton of fun!!! i'll take her off of your hands!!
want me to find you a mellow trail pony to trade?
i'm in vermont, probably too far, but i sure do like what i hear about your misty!

birdsong
Dec. 5, 2009, 10:14 PM
How about a donkey, mini, goat or sheep companion?

There's your answer. OOps just read that hubby isn't for it...WHY???

OK just ship her to me freight collect and she can live in Paradise where the weather is divine...aka Florida....

sdlbredfan
Dec. 6, 2009, 09:29 AM
Here are a few stables in my area to contact for help. I hope the mods do not remove this, as its purpose is not sales but educational and helpful.
www.glencarry.com
http://www.glencarry.com/heartland/index.html
and page with additional stables contact info:
http://nhh.glencarry.com/ads.htm (ignore the link for chimeraec, that stable changed hands) - the 4 after that one are your 'best bets'. Some of those stables have websites, http://www.phoenixequestriancenter.com/
http://thefarmatbutterflat.com/home.html
http://quailrunhorsecentre.com/index.htm

dmalbone
Dec. 6, 2009, 10:15 AM
I do strongly urge you to have a heart to heart with your husband. Like previously mentioned, horses are social animals and need companionship. While we go off to work all day, talk on the phone, go to the store, etc. we are constantly interacting with other people whether we want to or not. Imagine if you never had another human to interact with. Ever. It's depressing. My horse got extremely depressed when he was alone and when I bring him home there is absolutely no option to let him stand out there by himself. I'll be getting another horse (and if I wasn't a donkey, goat, etc.). I know many horses who get very depressed and stressed out being alone. Whereas your horse is literally jumping over huge fences to get to you for company another horse may exhibit this different ways... depression, lethargy, weight loss, aggression, colic, etc. As you can tell, I am a firm believer that horses should not be left alone as a single animal... especially if you go get a 20-something year old guy to spoil who's been around horses his entire life.

goeslikestink
Dec. 6, 2009, 12:59 PM
My 3 year old Quarter Horse filly, has caused so many problems and I am at my wit's end. I got her as a starved 2 year old, managed to put weight on her, and then this past fall she was due her shot's but came down with West Nile, I got her over that. Now for the new problem, my husband spend all summer building me a 5' tall horse fence with poly wire and solid wood post every 10 feet, and I have not taught her to jump at all, but she gets about 20 feet from the fence and leaps over like she a jumper, DID I TELL YOU THAT SHE IS ONLY 14'2 HANDS TALL! I don't know what to do now, any advise would help and the sooner the better.:eek:

try an elecy protable fence line 2/3ft away from the fence running two tapes
and plastic poles every 3mtrs buy an engerser and then stick it on a lorry battery once she gets the mesage that its no no then you can move it to somwwhre else or devide the field up

you can add a hot wire to top but you have the potential that the horse might get stuck or jumps clean
my idea is to stop her before she gets to the fence line

horseowner40
Dec. 6, 2009, 06:44 PM
I have had several asking why my husband would not let me get her a companion and here is the reason. I am 41 years old was injured severely in a horse accident (way before I knew him), I had a horse when I met him, my horse was 10 years old and I got him as a 2 year old, and when I met my husband he did not have a place to put a horse, I sold my horse to Dr. Lewis McCurdy a Vet in Huntsville, Alabama, and he still has my coco as of last week, coco is now 20 years old, Dr. McCurdy plays polo on him, I used him for endurance riding and played polo as well, so I knew he would have a good home.

2006 I had back surgery and had a untreated hematoma spinal leak, and loss all bladder function and all feeling below the waist, I was in severe pain and had a morphine pump. We moved to our log cabin in South Dakota because of my health and I felt better here with the low humidity.

Summer of 2008 I wanted a horse so she could be my legs, now I was in a wheelchair then, it agreed to this and we found Misty, I felt the same feeling for her that I had for Coco, so we bought her and she had just turned 2, I watched Clinton Anderson's starting under saddle and lunging for respect and control dvd's for hours and would practice it on Misty, I did exactly what he did. Before I knew it I could lounge her without a lead or halter, she knows all her command verbally because I had weak legs. Within 3 months of working with her I climbed on her bareback and my husband about had a fit. She never bucked, and I started her under saddle myself, working with her I forgot about my pain, I wanted to be with her so badly. Before I knew it I was getting around without a wheelchair, or my walker, and me and Misty were going down these long South Dakota dirt roads all day.

The most amazing thing is most young horse will not go to well without another horse, but she and I only had each other and she was fearless, from water crossings, to swimming, I even put tarps down on the ground and we walk and trotted on tarps. I owe my health to a horse! but I have known that she was special from the beginning.

Misty has never spooked, she and I would never take no for an answer to anything, and she would never refuse anything I asked. FEARLESS is what she is, but me no so much anymore, I hurt all the time. My husband watches me go work with Misty everyday and then come in dying in pain and get up the next day to do all over again, I spend more time with her than I do in the house. Today it only got up to 16 degrees and I spent the day in her stall because I can't put her in the pasture right now because she jumps the fence. I did tie her out with a 30 foot lead so that she could graze.

Now you guys can understand why I can't have a companion for her, I was lucky to have her. I think my husband is jealous of this horse!:no:

sdlbredfan
Dec. 6, 2009, 07:37 PM
I agree with dmalbone, keep trying to get hubby to see reason on this. No offense meant, but I think you need to keep the horse, get a companion for it, and see if you can rehome the hubby, unless you can get him to see reason. This horse has done so much for you already, it does seem a shame to rehome her, just for lack of having a companion for her. With a four acre pasture there is absolutely no good reason not to have a companion for her. IMO, your hubby is being unreasonable, and I am at least halfway serious in saying maybe he needs to go, and the horse stays.

horseowner40
Dec. 6, 2009, 10:30 PM
I agree with dmalbone, keep trying to get hubby to see reason on this. No offense meant, but I think you need to keep the horse, get a companion for it, and see if you can rehome the hubby, unless you can get him to see reason. This horse has done so much for you already, it does seem a shame to rehome her, just for lack of having a companion for her. With a four acre pasture there is absolutely no good reason not to have a companion for her. IMO, your hubby is being unreasonable, and I am at least halfway serious in saying maybe he needs to go, and the horse stays.

You are sooo wise, again I agree with you, he is being a baby, but short of a divorce my back is against the wall. Thanks for your kind thoughts.:)

dmalbone
Dec. 6, 2009, 10:45 PM
I guess I kind of understand. I'm so sorry you had to go through all of that but the logic of a companion for her really doesn't make sense. This doesn't need to be another horse you ride. I'm not a fan of keeping smaller animals with horses, but ANYTHING would be better than nothing. And unless you're going to lunge/ride/train a goat then I can't see how this will be taking time away from your husband. Yes, she bonded to you because that's all she had. She needs to learn how to be an animal and not fly over fences to get to you. If you are in so much pain, it sounds like dealing with a young rambunctious horse might be a bit much. It just seems like she's begging for attention really. I would rather a horse be rehomed instead of kept in a stall all the time. I'm sorry. :( I don't mean that meanly and if someone said that about my horse I would think they were being a b1tch. :) But in her case it just seems like you don't have the facilities or physical abilities to take care of her without injuring yourself.

Tying on on leads that long is asking for injuries and that's the last thing you need right now.

dmalbone
Dec. 6, 2009, 10:51 PM
I agree with dmalbone, keep trying to get hubby to see reason on this. No offense meant, but I think you need to keep the horse, get a companion for it, and see if you can rehome the hubby, unless you can get him to see reason. This horse has done so much for you already, it does seem a shame to rehome her, just for lack of having a companion for her. With a four acre pasture there is absolutely no good reason not to have a companion for her. IMO, your hubby is being unreasonable, and I am at least halfway serious in saying maybe he needs to go, and the horse stays.
I completely understand your seriousness. I "screened" prior boyfriends before getting engaged to make sure they were willing to compromise with the horses and understand that I know best in horse situations and it's better to just smile and nod. :lol: We were in the same type of situation... have one horse I solely own who has a buddy he's been with forever who will be PTS soon. Knowing that my horse couldn't be alone I talked to DH. He was honestly confused, not being a horse person, but after I explained to him he's totally ok. He would never put his feelings and wanting to see more for an extra 10 minutes over the health and sanity of another creature (be it horse, dog, cat, etc.) especially if it meant that much for me. I'm not saying some horses are not successfully kept alone, but if it was most logical that my horse was endangering her life as well as the lives of those in cars driving by we would at least try something else.

horseowner40
Dec. 6, 2009, 10:53 PM
I guess I kind of understand. I'm so sorry you had to go through all of that but the logic of a companion for her really doesn't make sense. This doesn't need to be another horse you ride. I'm not a fan of keeping smaller animals with horses, but ANYTHING would be better than nothing. And unless you're going to lunge/ride/train a goat then I can't see how this will be taking time away from your husband. Yes, she bonded to you because that's all she had. She needs to learn how to be an animal and not fly over fences to get to you. If you are in so much pain, it sounds like dealing with a young rambunctious horse might be a bit much. It just seems like she's begging for attention really. I would rather a horse be rehomed instead of kept in a stall all the time. I'm sorry. :( I don't mean that meanly and if someone said that about my horse I would think they were being a b1tch. :) But in her case it just seems like you don't have the facilities or physical abilities to take care of her without injuring yourself.

Tying on on leads that long is asking for injuries and that's the last thing you need right now.

Yes, I agree, I should have got an older horse to begin with and yes it is hard to deal with a young one. I am pretty well at my final straw, if she attempts to keeping jumping the hot wire, Misty will find a new owner who can give her a job, she is jumping because of me, and that is not good! I wish I could get a mini jack ass, I have even looked at them, but no luck. I will do what is best for the horse no matter what I want.

dmalbone
Dec. 6, 2009, 10:56 PM
I will do what is best for the horse no matter what I want. Good for you for understanding that. It is always hard isn't it?

AnnaCrew
Dec. 7, 2009, 01:04 AM
I know, it is hard, but if you will search you will find that there are horses who can be kept alone and they do not suffer much, especially elderly horses who already had spent a long periods of their life alone; single horse owners are places to look at.

I agree that your filly is desperate for company and she just might be too frightened to be left alone - young horses sometimes are.

I had met horses who are OK being alone - they are easy to rehome as it is always easier to find somebody who is keen to have one horse here - multiple horses homes are harder to find. So really you would be better and filly will be better if you will part and you will find an elderly horse - I'm sure such a horse is waiting for you just now.

I know how brilliant is this COTH community and I'm sure that you will get all the help here rehoming your filly and COTHERs will go wild searching a suitable horse for you! :)

sdlbredfan
Dec. 7, 2009, 08:03 AM
AnnaCrew just pointed out something good, that I had forgotten. There are indeed horses that are more relaxed about being alone. I am still hoping you can get Hubby to be reasonable (with 4 acres, you certainly have space for another horse), but understand that if you can't get him to change his mind, Misty will have to be rehomed. Good luck, and keep us posted!

WorthTheWait95
Dec. 7, 2009, 10:06 AM
Yes, I agree, I should have got an older horse to begin with and yes it is hard to deal with a young one. I am pretty well at my final straw, if she attempts to keeping jumping the hot wire, Misty will find a new owner who can give her a job, she is jumping because of me, and that is not good! I wish I could get a mini jack ass, I have even looked at them, but no luck. I will do what is best for the horse no matter what I want.

Honestly if your hubby is way against a companion for this horse you might not be the right family for any horse. While there are some horses that are okay alone in my experience they are few and far between. Horses are herd animals and need companionship. The only time I've known a single horse farm to work is when the horse could see other horses at neighboring farms.
You need to rehome her or get a companion and quickly since I can't imagine she's loving her life right now being locked in a stall 24/7.

willowmeadow
Dec. 7, 2009, 11:28 AM
My husband spent the day today cutting steel post into to act as extension's, so much for a pretty fence..he is going to screw them into the wood post and stretch hot wire, but right now she is up in a stall until I can fix this problem oh and by the way, I did try tying walmart plastic bags to our fence but she was not scared of the bags...Thanks for the advice.:)

I didn't see where anyone else said anything about this, but please be careful with the steel posts for extensions for the fence. I have pictured the steel posts vertically from your other fence posts. I would hate to see the horse try and jump the fence and land on one of the steel posts.

Fancy That
Dec. 9, 2009, 02:19 PM
Honestly if your hubby is way against a companion for this horse you might not be the right family for any horse. While there are some horses that are okay alone in my experience they are few and far between. Horses are herd animals and need companionship. The only time I've known a single horse farm to work is when the horse could see other horses at neighboring farms.
You need to rehome her or get a companion and quickly since I can't imagine she's loving her life right now being locked in a stall 24/7.

You have good intentions, but I think it's actually almost cruel to keep a horse alone with no other animal companionship. She can't speak english, but she's screaming at the top of her lungs that she isn't happy being alone.

They are SUCH herd animals and social dynamics are a major consideration. Being locked in a stall is also cruel (again - especially without other horses) You've removed her freedom of movement and need for social companionship.

I agree 100% with the above post. I wouldnt' get another horse unless you can have a companion, either.

I know others may not agree with me...it's my personal opinion that horses should not live solitary lives.

horseowner40
Dec. 9, 2009, 08:43 PM
I didn't see where anyone else said anything about this, but please be careful with the steel posts for extensions for the fence. I have pictured the steel posts vertically from your other fence posts. I would hate to see the horse try and jump the fence and land on one of the steel posts.

I have thought about this problem as well, we are not putting them on every post just ever 20 feet, the hot wire does not have to be very tight, hopefully this will work.:)

horseowner40
Dec. 9, 2009, 09:06 PM
You have good intentions, but I think it's actually almost cruel to keep a horse alone with no other animal companionship. She can't speak english, but she's screaming at the top of her lungs that she isn't happy being alone.

They are SUCH herd animals and social dynamics are a major consideration. Being locked in a stall is also cruel (again - especially without other horses) You've removed her freedom of movement and need for social companionship.

I agree 100% with the above post. I wouldnt' get another horse unless you can have a companion, either.

I know others may not agree with me...it's my personal opinion that horses should not live solitary lives.

I Agree.

EqTrainer
Dec. 9, 2009, 09:21 PM
Oh dear...

just a few words of caution. Giving away your horse is unlikely to affect your relationship w/your husband, no more than getting your horse a companion will.

You'll be sorry if you give away your horse whether he is there or not, right? Not sure I see how that is a win for you in any possible way. Get a goat for your horse if you cannot get anything else, goats here sell for about $15.00. Sounds like your fence is probably goat proof!

Hang in there -

horseowner40
Dec. 9, 2009, 09:55 PM
Oh dear...

just a few words of caution. Giving away your horse is unlikely to affect your relationship w/your husband, no more than getting your horse a companion will.

You'll be sorry if you give away your horse whether he is there or not, right? Not sure I see how that is a win for you in any possible way. Get a goat for your horse if you cannot get anything else, goats here sell for about $15.00. Sounds like your fence is probably goat proof!

Hang in there -

Thank You!

horseowner40
Dec. 9, 2009, 10:10 PM
new pics to come.

sdlbredfan
Dec. 9, 2009, 10:26 PM
I am sorry that the marriage seems to be disintegrating, but if it is, that makes it even more important for you to keep this filly, and get a companion for her. As stressful as a marriage ending can be, sometimes just getting away from an emotionally toxic relationship can be liberating. Little did I know, when I said earlier and half-seriously to keep the filly and rehome the husband that such a thing might really be in the works already. I hope any CoTH folks who are near you in SD will rally around to help you, you've already been through so much, and seems like you might need a helping hand from time to time based on your past injuries?

horseowner40
Dec. 10, 2009, 12:07 AM
I am sorry that the marriage seems to be disintegrating, but if it is, that makes it even more important for you to keep this filly, and get a companion for her. As stressful as a marriage ending can be, sometimes just getting away from an emotionally toxic relationship can be liberating. Little did I know, when I said earlier and half-seriously to keep the filly and rehome the husband that such a thing might really be in the works already. I hope any CoTH folks who are near you in SD will rally around to help you, you've already been through so much, and seems like you might need a helping hand from time to time based on your past injuries?

You guys are the best!:)

dmalbone
Dec. 10, 2009, 12:32 AM
She's adorable. :) what fun coloring.

horseowner40
Dec. 11, 2009, 04:52 PM
She's adorable. :) what fun coloring.

Thanks, she is in the middle of a growing spell right now, she is all legs! On her papers both on the Dam and Sire, they are very large horse's, most are well over 16 hands, I wonder if she is going to get much taller or if she is stunted from being starved? I measured her yesterday and she is now 14.3 hands. By the way you are a very nice person, thanks so much for all your advice.;)

horseowner40
Dec. 11, 2009, 04:57 PM
She was introduced to the hot wire today, and went nuts, she has tested it about 10 times. She keeps bucking and shaking her head and charging at the fence, I am waiting to see if she jumps. I hope this will keep her in the fence, this is my last hope, I am sitting outside watching her, and she is having a fit. Wish me luck!:eek:

dmalbone
Dec. 12, 2009, 01:35 AM
By the way you are a very nice person, thanks so much for all your advice.;) Aw, thank you so much. I had a crappy day so that feels nice! :D

Mara
Dec. 14, 2009, 10:06 PM
I love her color; she's cute as can be! I agree with keeping her. It sounds like she's really been a key figure in your rehab from what was clearly a horrific injury.

lesson junkie
Dec. 14, 2009, 11:54 PM
Did I read in post 51-you were in a wheelchair and this mare helped you get better-and hubby won't get her a goat?

BuddyRoo
Dec. 15, 2009, 12:08 AM
Okay.


So let me get this straight.

You are in a wheel chair.

You have this one horse.

Hubby doesn't want more responsibilities (like having a companion)...and you're thinking of rehoming the horse.

What are we missing?

I have the urge to SAY something. LOUDLY. I just want to make sure I have the premise down pat.

dmalbone
Dec. 15, 2009, 12:34 AM
Maybe I misunderstood, but i don't think that she's in a wheelchair anymore. I got the impression that she was previously. Could be wrong...