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tle
Dec. 2, 2009, 08:56 AM
Still waiting to hear on the house stuff (the offer on mine and be able to get into negotiations on the farm). In the meantime, I've been doign some doodling... trying to design a barn that we can eventually look at putting up. Have a question for ya'll -- How big are your tack and feed rooms? How many horses in the barn for this size? Do you feel they are the right size for that number of horses?... too big? Too small? Any amenities in either that you feel you just couldn't live without?

Thanks for the input!

Bluey
Dec. 2, 2009, 09:09 AM
First question you need to answer is where are you located, what climate and the lay of the land.
That will determine which kind of barn to build.

Then, are you going to be caring for the horses intensively, or do you rather make chores simple and ride more?

Your horses mostly inside, mostly outside the barn?
Stalls with pens make horse keeping extremely more simple, when horses kept in stalls is very labor intensive.

Standard stall size is 12' by 12', but we had bigger TB race horses doing fine in 10' by 10' stalls and I prefer in general 14' by 14' stalls for most horses.

A basic barn shell and adding portable stalls, that can be very fancy too, will let you manage subsequent changes to your barn much better than those built into the framing.

We need more information, like how many horses are you thinking about and if you expect to need to expand later.:yes:

Ltc4h
Dec. 2, 2009, 09:21 AM
I can answer the tack/feed question.
10 horses;
tack room-small attached shed 12 x 36
Needs;
wall mount saddle racks
wall for bridles
rubber made container for pads/wraps
whip holder
organization
Feed room-sectioned off part of shed 12 x 8
Needs;
separate containers for different feeds
wall cabinet for medications
Shelves

Wants-
Neither has heat or running H2O
Currently hang wet turnouts in barn

Bluey
Dec. 2, 2009, 09:30 AM
Most standard barns have one standard stall as the tackroom, the bigger barns two as one room.

I would not hang saddles on walls, but use portable saddle racks, that can easily be for three or four saddles and you can rearrange as your needs change, are not left with holes in the walls when you want to put the saddles in another wall.

tle
Dec. 2, 2009, 10:06 AM
Going a little beyond what I was asking, but hey... if ya'll want to add some input/daydreaming into my doodles... who am I to argue!! :) Have fun! I'll list what my doodle currently contains at the end.


First question you need to answer is where are you located, what climate and the lay of the land.
That will determine which kind of barn to build.

SW Ohio -- typical midwest weather... not TOO heavy on snowfall usually but we do get some. Typically have a few mid 90 days in the summer... down to a few single digit days in winter. Land on the farm we're looking at is relatively flat. Where I am currently thinking of putting it there is already a very old barn standing, which of course would be demo'd. Rest of acreage is between flat and slightly rolling.


Then, are you going to be caring for the horses intensively, or do you rather make chores simple and ride more?

simple is better and I've really gotten to like the idea of a Paddock Paradise setup instead of even regular pastures. Most PP models have simple run in sheds and I've been told by many enthusiasts that I don't NEED a barn with such a setup. However, I do still LOVE a nice, neat, clean barn. AND I like the idea of bringing horses into their stalls in bad weather.


Your horses mostly inside, mostly outside the barn?
Stalls with pens make horse keeping extremely more simple, when horses kept in stalls is very labor intensive.

I'd say out as much as possible. With the PP setup I envision, they'll have 2-3 "loops" I can open/close as needed, all stemming from a large sacrifice paddock near the barn. They can be out 24/7 if everything works out, but there will be times they will need to be brought in.


We need more information, like how many horses are you thinking about and if you expect to need to expand later.

one for each of us to start... that's 5 (although chances are that 2-3 will be smaller horses/ponies). Would like the ability to add a couple more - whether they be pack ponies (we want to get into trail riding) or back ups for friends to ride or training projects or maybe even 1-2 boarders. Not too many. the possibility of expanding in the future is there, but I'm ok with less than 10 total

My current doodle is a 36x72 pole barn that I can add stalls to as I can afford it (and as we need it -- remember, we dont' actually have any horses to move in right away!). The finished doodle has 8 stalls -- 7 are 12x12, 1 is 12x11. All that is subject to change depending on the size of the horses (we'll probably need a draft cross for 6'6" hubby so we may end up with a 12x14 and a 12x10 to compensate). Also included are a 10x12 feed room (would contain all grain and maybe 10 bales of hay, the remainder of the hay will be kept in one of the other barns on the property); a 12x12 grooming/wash rack; 9x6 bathroom with washer/dryer; 9x6 storage area (thinking place to put wheelbarrow, forks, etc.); and a 12x12 tack room. Barn has a 12' center aisle. No complete loft, but I do intend on putting a ceiling on the tack room/bathroom/storage area at least (maybe the wash rack) so I'll have a little bit of storage for stuff like fans in the winter, heated buckets in the summer, etc.

Keep in mind... this is a DOODLE (aka dream). I know I won't have a bathroom right away or a finished wash rack. But I think I'd rather think about the "finished" product and work towards it than get done building and realize I have to do some MAJOR renovations right away to add something I really want (and a bathroom with washer/dryer and a hot/cold washrack are on my really want list).

subk
Dec. 2, 2009, 09:44 PM
I have a private six stall barn. My tackroom, bathroom and feed room irregularly take up the same space as two 13x14 (on centers) stalls with a loft only over that space. My tackroom is set up with an under-counter fridge, small boy water heater, utility sink and at some point side by side washer and dryers. It's fine for my daughter and me and maybe a boarder (or two.)

My feedroom is significantly smaller than the tackroom (maybe 6 or 7 feet plus a little niche area for feed cans.) I have traditional stairs up to the loft, pelleted bedding and feed there, plus a big rolling tool box and some other stuff that will have a new home once I finish out the tackroom and hay storage shed. Without the "other stuff" I could get in 6-8 bales of hay and a wheelbarrow--but probably won't until I need the stall they are in now.

The biggest thing you need to remember is that what you NEED most is wall space not open floor space! So two side by side narrow rooms are more functional than one big room. i.e go for two 4 or 5 foot wide by 12 storage rooms instead of a 8/10 x 12 space!

Those stairs up to the loft take up a LOT of space, but I love them! Remember, we're not getting younger. Really think through what your going to need as you age. Knowing that I want and need to be able to take care of my own horses and that my knees already suck, I didn't want to be regularly climbing up a vertical ladder on the wall to get to the loft as an old lady!

12 feet is too wide for a wash stall.

AnotherRound
Dec. 3, 2009, 01:09 PM
TIP: Whip Holder

My trainer has these scattered around her barn and on the ingate to each ring: 6 inch PVC Pipe or wider with a bottom made for one end and use it mounted on the wall or fence to hold the whips. Not sure what she used for the bottom, but you could be creative - find a coffee can top that fits; jam in a piece of styrofoam; whatever you use for an outdoor version, use waterproof materials or glue, if you use any glue, and put a few holes in the bottom to drain.

Cut a length of (white) PVC pluming pipe (the kind with the drainage holes on the sides) 2 feet or so long and mount it to the wall with the stopped up end/bottom pointed down to the ground, near the ingate to the indoor arena, in the tack room, on the fence by the outdoor ring. Crops and whips can be put right in it, and easily retrieved, including from on top of the horse. You alway know right where they are.

Pocket Pony
Dec. 6, 2009, 05:14 PM
I have a four-stall center aisle barn - well, 3 of the spaces are stalls, and the 4th is the feedroom. Stalls are supposedly 12x12 but are probably more like 11x11. All the stalls open to their own turnout/sacrifice areas that are fenced off, and from there each area opens up to a small pasture area where they can go out in good weather. In bad weather, they all choose to be inside, although they could go out in their paddocks (60' long), if they like.

If you're looking into the feedroom area, along the right wall are two pallets for shavings/pellets. Along the back wall is a cupboard for supplements/towels/extra stuff. Along the left wall are the feed containers (stored in a big Rubbermaid outdoor garden container so the horses can't get at the feed), a tall drawer unit for meds/first aid stuff, and a medium-height unit for grooming box, bell boots, hoof boots.

We built a hay storage room at the back of the barn that spans the entire width (so, one stall, aisle space, one stall - probably 36' x 10' deep). We can fit 90 (big) bales in there at a time. This was definitely a huge deal for us and we love having the extra hay storage space.

Tack room and cross ties are separate from the barn and are between the barn and arena. Not ideal, IMHO, but it works just fine for us. Since I trailer out so much, most of my tack just resides there! Tack room is also our pump house and is maybe 10 x 10...or 8 x 8. I have a 6-headstall bridle rack and four saddle racks and two tack trunks and a huge cabinet for extra saddle pads and other tack items (extra bits, stirrups, martingales, bandages, books, clippers, etc.).

My next barn will be a 6-stall shedrow - the middle two stalls will be a feed room and a tack room. Two stalls will be on each end, with each stall having a double-wide turnout area that opens up to a pasture (the corner stalls will use up extra space on the side of the barn, and middle stalls will each take turnout space that is on the other side of the tack/feed room, if that makes sense). I'll have an add-on hay storage room that would make the barn look "L" shaped, and a heated washrack would be nice, although not a necessity. Crossties would be in front of the stalls under the cover of the shedrow. Not that I've thought this out or anything! :lol:

I like my horses to be out as much as possible - much easier for stall mucking, much healthier for them.

hb
Dec. 6, 2009, 05:44 PM
I have a 4-stall barn and use one stall for a feed room. My tack room is about 10X10, and it seems sufficient for 2 horses and a 20+ year accumulation of various stuff. The tackroom has a water heater and big sink, and has a wash stall right next to it.

I haven't used the stalls for several years - my barn has a large overhang/run in behind it and the horses live out 24/7/365. There are three paddocks behind my barn that feed into the run-in, and a run out to the pasture. The run-in has gates so I can separate everyone into their own paddock or open it up and turn everyone out. Right now my retiree is turned out in a well-graveled sacrifice paddock and my riding horse has access to the pasture. They both spend most of the day hanging out in the run-in though.

For the first couple of years that I lived here I brought the horses in every night, but one day I though "why do I shut my horses in at night and clean stalls every day?". We're all much happier with the current arrangement.

The things I like best about my barn:

- the run-in and paddock arrangement (run-in is 16 feet wide by 72 feet long and well sheltered - it's actually cozy)
- enough hay storage for a full year's worth of hay for both my horses (if I use one of the stalls for hay also)
- hot water heater in the tack room (not only is it great to have hot water but it keeps it just above freezing in the tack room, nice for soaking beet pulp etc.)

MHM
Dec. 6, 2009, 05:51 PM
All the stalls open to their own turnout/sacrifice areas that are fenced off, and from there each area opens up to a small pasture area where they can go out in good weather. In bad weather, they all choose to be inside, although they could go out in their paddocks (60' long), if they like.

<snip>

I like my horses to be out as much as possible - much easier for stall mucking, much healthier for them.

I think this is the ideal set up if you have the room to make it work. If the stalls all have front doors into the barn aisle, and back doors directly into paddocks, you can keep the horses inside in bad weather, make them stay out in good weather, or let the horses decide as you wish. Plus you'll have good cross-ventilation from all the doors. I like Dutch doors on the outside for ventilation, plus the horses love to stick their heads out.

Two things I did in my barn- I put all the doors into the stalls on the right side (as you face the stall from the aisle), so as you lead the horse in, it's easy for him to turn around you to the left. Also, I made the boards in between two stalls removable, so if I have a huge horse, or a broodmare, or one on lay-up, I can give it a double stall.

And you can never have too many electrical outlets!

InstigatorKate
Dec. 7, 2009, 12:55 AM
Sounds like a good plan! Only thing I noticed is that you really don't need a 12x12 wash stall. It's overkill and actually (I think) harder to keep a horse cross-tied in one when they are a little squirmy for bathing. The 8x8 at my old barn was plenty big.

tle
Dec. 7, 2009, 09:37 AM
Sounds like a good plan! Only thing I noticed is that you really don't need a 12x12 wash stall. It's overkill and actually (I think) harder to keep a horse cross-tied in one when they are a little squirmy for bathing. The 8x8 at my old barn was plenty big.

A couple people have told me this so let me explain my thinking. Keep in mind that what I'm explaining is my "final" vision for the space... it will be pieced together as time/finances allow.

Yes, it will be a wash stall with hot/cold water available. Along one side wall (the wall adjacent to the bathroom) will be cabinets with a 2-basin utility sink. So that will take up around 2' of width floor space. So now we're down to about a 12x10. No sense in making it any less deep than 12' as that is what fits in the space. This is also the only non-stall, non-aisle way grooming area... and as such is also planned as the space for the farrier/vet with plenty of light and (with the proper amount of savings) a UV overheat heater. :-) Don't want it too tight because of that.

Bluey
Dec. 7, 2009, 09:44 AM
I wonder about cabinets in a wet area as a wash stall is really a good idea?
Now, in a gooming/farrier/vet stall, that is different.
Here is a picture someone on COTH posted long ago of their barn and you can see the set up is similar to what you are talking about, but I don't know if that was also a wash stall:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/aisle2.jpg?t=1260197021

ReSomething
Dec. 7, 2009, 10:28 AM
Since I dug this book out for another thread I'll name it here, How to build Animal Housing, 60 plans for Coops, Hutches, Barns, Sheds, Pens, Nest Boxes, Feeders, Stanchions and Much More by Carol Ekarius, Storey Publishing. Cost about $25. She's gone out and collected a lot of Extension plans, has a list of sources and suppliers in the back, has a whole section on construction, farm plumbing and wiring, all in all pretty useful if just for ideas.

DH has used it to build a chicken tractor, which came out beautifully, and for ideas for other small animal housing.
It has about five or six plans for barns, stables and run ins, most of them you could build off the plan in the book although they are missing some dimensions, like door heights, but between the lot of them they are there.

tle
Dec. 7, 2009, 10:33 AM
I wonder about cabinets in a wet area as a wash stall is really a good idea?
Now, in a gooming/farrier/vet stall, that is different.
Here is a picture someone on COTH posted long ago of their barn and you can see the set up is similar to what you are talking about, but I don't know if that was also a wash stall:

http://i13.photobucket.com/albums/a298/Robintoo/aisle2.jpg?t=1260197021

That's exactly what I was thinking of. I don't know why cabinets wouldn't work in a wash stall area, as long as they were protected with water protectant. The space will be a grooming/exam area MUCH more often than a wash area (but I want the drains installed and ability to use it as such as the need arises).

shawneeAcres
Dec. 7, 2009, 10:46 AM
My barn is a 20 x 100 foot structure. You can see pics of it (some detailed showing the construction):

http://good-times.webshots.com/album/569459911nWMeoO

We have 8 - 12' x 10' stalls, one 12 x 10' grooming stall (currently not set up to wash in, we have mats overtop of screenings on floor jsut as stalls do, but hope to put concrete and drain soon), a 20 x 10' feed room - PLENTY big enough and the tack room is 12 x 20 with and outside "porch" on it. THe tack room has wall mounted saddle and bridle racks, a full size refrigerator and a small table, plenty of room in there, there are 11 total saddle racks. Our barn is a "shed row" style that we designed and built ourselves (except for the shell that was designed by us and erected by Carolina Carports in two days). We have outlets for each stall high up so we can have fans. Feed roomhas a front rollup door for unloading feed as well as a side door that opens into aisleway for feeding.

deltawave
Dec. 7, 2009, 05:43 PM
Three stall private barn, usually 2 horses and a pony.

Tack room: 12 x 16 feet.
Feed room: none--I keep grain in two large garbage cans inside the tack room, my scant few supplements in a smaller bucket or two on the floor next to that. (vitamin stuff and feed-through fly control, usually) Over the bins is a shelf where I keep dewormer, aspirin, a little molasses if I have to mix up meds, pill grinder, etc. etc. So "feed" takes up about 10 square feet of my tack room. I don't keep many bags at a time around, since I have so few animals, they eat very little grain, and I pass the feed store every day on my way to/from work.

Hay I do NOT like to have anywhere near my tack or "stuff" so I have a hay storage area that used to be a wash stall. :D I keep most of the hay up in the loft, but every week or so I chuck down enough bales to last me until the next day I have time for barn chores. Wash stall is ready for action but has proven unnecessary since I never wash horses in the winter and it's just as easy to tie 'em to the trailer (just outside the barn) and wash 'em there.

IMO there is no such thing as a "too big" tack room. I have a lot of crap for my horses. I could, however, probably get by with a smaller room. The thing is, every inch of wall space is "taken", floor to ceiling, and there's this vast open space in the middle that just doesn't ever get used. I roll a saddle rack out every now and then to strip down and clean a saddle, yeah, but how often is that? Not too bloody often. :lol: I don't "hang out" in the tack room, so that big open space sort of bugs me. If I could do it different I might put a partition halfway down the middle of the long wall, dividing the room almost in half, so I'd have more wall/shelf space and two separate half-rooms, maybe one for stuff I use all the time and one for stuff I use occasionally. But it won't happen any time soon--I've plenty of room for "stuff" and kind of like the open feel, even with the wasted floor space.

Must haves: (for me)
1. A big laundry tub with hot/cold running water
2. A wall heater (electric), just enough to keep the room > 40 degrees in the winter since the water pipe is in there and can't be allowed to freeze
3. A dehumidifier for summer or my tack gets mildew-y
4. Really great insulation so the heat bill isn't ridiculous even to keep it at 40 degrees. Also have not had one single varmint in there in 3 years.
5. Lots and lots of shelves, and one of those great plastic racks to hold large Rubbermaid tubs.
6. A concrete floor
7. A little dorm fridge for meds, drinks, tetanus toxoid, whatever
8. A door mat out in front to prevent me tracking in dirt and bedding!!